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2017 Forester Touring
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hoping any Canadian (BC) Fozzy owners may give some input on this.

I hear BC has new rules on having Winter Tires when travelling mountain roads during Winter.
It is my understanding that tire chains are not an acceptable alternative to be used on standard tires. You must have M+S or 'Mountain Snowflake' tires or you will be fined / turned back by the Police.

I was planning on travelling to Whistler using SEA-SKY highway from Seattle. I only have Stock tires on my new touring. I dont understand the logic of tire chains not acceptable when they work just fine this side of the border. Ok diff country diff rules but I really dont want to buy a new set of tires just to drive up to BC.

Does anyone know if they allow AWD vehicles to go through even though you may not have a designated winter tires ?

I know they keep the highways pretty well clear and most cars wont have an issue.
If 2WD cars can get by fine then of all AWD vehicles, a Forester AWD should be fine too I reckon. Do the Police recognize the stellar AWD of Subies and let them thru as an exception to the rule maybe ?

I do understand winter tires are more important then AWD, I just dont want to drive up there all the way only to be turned back/fined.

Cheers
 

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2018 Honda Pilot EX-L 6 speed auto
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If the requirement is to have M+S tire as minimum, the tires on your car should have M+S stamped on them. However, the OEM tires are quite poor in the snow, so be prepared for that if you are in the mountains up there.
 

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2014 FXT Limited HT-CVT
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79 Posts
Hoping any Canadian (BC) Fozzy owners may give some input on this.

I hear BC has new rules on having Winter Tires when travelling mountain roads during Winter.
It is my understanding that tire chains are not an acceptable alternative to be used on standard tires. You must have M+S or 'Mountain Snowflake' tires or you will be fined / turned back by the Police.

I was planning on travelling to Whistler using SEA-SKY highway from Seattle. I only have Stock tires on my new touring. I dont understand the logic of tire chains not acceptable when they work just fine this side of the border. Ok diff country diff rules but I really dont want to buy a new set of tires just to drive up to BC.

Does anyone know if they allow AWD vehicles to go through even though you may not have a designated winter tires ?

I know they keep the highways pretty well clear and most cars wont have an issue.
If 2WD cars can get by fine then of all AWD vehicles, a Forester AWD should be fine too I reckon. Do the Police recognize the stellar AWD of Subies and let them thru as an exception to the rule maybe ?

I do understand winter tires are more important then AWD, I just dont want to drive up there all the way only to be turned back/fined.

Cheers


Much like Quebec, it is mandatory to have M/S stamped tires for the severe service. MB is pushing their way towards it because we have brutal colds with high winds and a bunch of snow, relatively.

It's not so much the tire tread, or the type of drive system your vehicle has, but the compound of the tires. They turn to hockey pucks.

Hard cold rubber + Snowy/Iced over Roads + Hills, bad camber, steep grades and hairpin turns = A Bad Time on Bad tires.

Depending on your fozzies build, you may be able to get a nice "All-Weather" tire. It's not as good as a dedicated winter. But it'll work. Such as the Nokian WRG3 or Michigan Defender. If it's more of a off-road styled build, Yokohama Geolander G015, BF Goodrich AT KO2, or many others.

If winter driving is a thing where you are. Get a set of Blizzak WS80's and never look back

Cheers


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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2016 2.0 XT CVT
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9 Posts
Here's a link from the Ministry of Transportation from the Province of BC that deals with the winter tire requirements.
Winter Tires and Chains - Province of British Columbia

Look at the PDF link to get details as to what constitute a "winter tire" including having adequate tread depth. :nerd:

Enjoy the snow in Whistler.

Matt
 

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2017 Forester Touring
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110 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info guys. I deferred my trip for now but will look into the tires you mentioned.
Not sure if US has those same marking - M+S but will look into that next time I am nearby tire shop
 

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2018 Forester XT
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The duellers are garbage for winter conditions. I'm from BC, and if the conditions are bad, you will be putting you and your ride at increased risk.
 

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2011 CDN Convenience Pkg 4AT
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Note: Quebec requires the Snowflake Mountain winter tires M+S not accepted, but only for Quebec residents. Individuals from out of province plates are exempt.


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2015 Forester XT
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Just joined the forum and saw this.

In BC, you must have M+S tires on mountain roads, Oct 1 - Mar 31, otherwise you can be turned away by RCMP, and, also, a possible $109 fine.

The duellers are garbage in the winter. I slid quite a ways in icy rain, very lucky I went into an oncoming merge lane on the left side of oncoming traffic. I have since upgraded to 17" Nokian Hakkapelitta R2's from Kal Tire, as well as a pair of chains . I got 17" used aluminum rims from a used tire shop for $100. This saved me about $200, if I recall.

I also got rid of the duellers and got Yokohama for my other set of tires, mounted on the factory rims.
 

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2018 Forester XT Limited CVT
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There are signs about tire requirements on the way up to Whistler but we don't pay attention to them because we have Blizzaks on our cars. Previously we have driven up there in cars with all-seasons without problem, but there is always the risk of poor road conditions or being stopped and having tires inspected. There's another local ski hill, Seymour Mountain, that we used to take our kid to for ski lessons, and they often had tire inspections before they let you start driving up the mountain.

We change to our winter tires when the temperature drops below 7 C. Winter tires are made of rubber that remains pliable at cold temperatures. Non-winter tires get hard in the cold and don't comply with the road surface and traction suffers.

Just like in the financial world, as we get older we tolerate less risk. I'd rather avoid problems to make sure we get there and back without incident. I'd rather keep my family safe and would like all other vehicles around us to be equipped and driven safely. I also have fun driving around in the snow but don't do anything dangerous on public roads.
 
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