Subaru Forester Owners Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anybody know why? I was under the impression that all XT's had VLSD's. I removed the diff, took the cover off and there it was, a useless piece of poo open diff.


really!?



 

·
Registered
1998 Cayenne GTS 6speed
Joined
·
1,751 Posts
It is a VLSD. The viscous coupling (yes, a really tiny one) is behind (under) the crown gear, iirc. Esy to check if it's working by turning one of the axle outputs by hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Well blow me! I thought it looked like a open diff (obvioulsy).

Could some of you diff guru's possibly help me with another diff problem I have? I'm in the middle of fitting an STi clutch pack type rear diff and I noticed that I was unable to turn the any of the rear wheels while the car was jacked up and out of gear.
I'm presently having problems with a cv joint on the rear end as well, not sure if it's the bell joint(outer) or the double offset joint(inner).
 

·
Premium Member
2009 Outback XT-B 5MT
Joined
·
10,254 Posts
It does, but it isn't. All of the LSD components are sandwiched between the bolt heads and the ring gear.
 

·
Premium Member
2009 Outback XT-B 5MT
Joined
·
10,254 Posts
Some type of Torsen or helical diff, no doubt.

Clutch diffs have cutouts for the locking-cams.
 

·
Premium Member
2009 Outback XT-B 5MT
Joined
·
10,254 Posts
Depends on what you are doing. Clutch types tend to be noisy, kind of aggressive, but required for extended usage where wheelspin is an issue (rally, or lifting a tire in auto-x).

Helical LSD's are better suited for situations where both wheels remain in contact with the ground.

Typically, for daily drivers that aren't tracked or raced on a super competitive level, a helical LSD is going to be a better option... typically more expensive as well.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top