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2006 Forester X
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14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am about to build a new motor for my 06 NA fozzy since my current one blew up (got metal everywhere and a rebuild of that engine would be too much effort currently. inb4 yes, I should've kept tabs on my oil.). I have 06 heads from a friend and will be getting a junkyard short block. I have a full head gasket kit on the way. Other than that believe I should get a new pilot bearing and new flywheel bolts. A friend highly recommended getting new head bolts. Is this necessary or a while-i'm-in-there kind of thing? I have a timing belt, tensioner, and water pump from my current motor with less than 15k which I will be moving over. If I am missing anything please let me know.
Thanks
 

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2003 Forester X 5 MT
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522 Posts
Head bolts don't need to be replaced unless damaged (according to a very experienced Subaru rebuilder. Make sure you use the MLS Subaru Head Gasket 11044AA642 or 11044AA770 (Turbo). I've heard Felpro are good too. Not sure which engine gasket set you are getting but may be worth it to check the Head Gaskets supplied with it. Head surface prep is an important task as well.
 

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2006 Forester X
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14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Head bolts don't need to be replaced unless damaged (according to a very experienced Subaru rebuilder. Make sure you use the MLS Subaru Head Gasket 11044AA642 or 11044AA770 (Turbo). I've heard Felpro are good too. Not sure which engine gasket set you are getting but may be worth it to check the Head Gaskets supplied with it. Head surface prep is an important task as well.
I did purchase a Felpro gasket. About the head surface prep. Would I be looking at getting the heads machined flat or just making sure none of the oil galleries are clogged and the coolant passages are ok?
 

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1999 Forester S
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530 Posts
You'll either need to take the cylinder heads to a machine shop, or lap them at home.

The block generally doesn't warp (the heads do, they lift in between the cylinders) so the only thing to do there is clean up the gasket surface a bit.

Besides using the 642 head gaskets, the two most important steps are torqueing the head bolts and using an OEM Subaru cogged timing belt pulley.

You must clean the threads in the block completely (an extra head bolt with a slot cut in it works well). Lube each head bolt bore liberally with assembly lube (I ran the bolts in and out three times each). Proceed with the FSM head torqueing procedure, but if you feel the bolts creaking AT ALL you need to pull them back out and clean/lube/reinstall until they don't creak.

I would also suggest replacing all PCV hoses, PCV valve, plastic PCV tee and the oil separator plate on the back of the engine.
 

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2006 Forester X
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14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
You'll either need to take the cylinder heads to a machine shop, or lap them at home.

The block generally doesn't warp (the heads do, they lift in between the cylinders) so the only thing to do there is clean up the gasket surface a bit.

Besides using the 642 head gaskets, the two most important steps are torqueing the head bolts and using an OEM Subaru cogged timing belt pulley.

You must clean the threads in the block completely (an extra head bolt with a slot cut in it works well). Lube each head bolt bore liberally with assembly lube (I ran the bolts in and out three times each). Proceed with the FSM head torqueing procedure, but if you feel the bolts creaking AT ALL you need to pull them back out and clean/lube/reinstall until they don't creak.

I would also suggest replacing all PCV hoses, PCV valve, plastic PCV tee and the oil separator plate on the back of the engine.
I talked to my friend with the heads and he said the car never overheated so the heads didn't warp. Being a poor college student, is there anyway I should do to the junkyard short block to make sure it will be reliable for me? Also do you have a recommendation on an oil separator plate?
 

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2005 OTB/Forester Hybrid Automatic
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38 Posts
With the engine out, it costs just a few dollars and a few minutes to replace the rear main seal.
 

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2006 Forester
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662 Posts
Here's a short list...:laugh:

Timing Belt: 13028AA231 - $69.00
Idlers:
13073AA142 - $57.50 x 1 (smooth)
13085AA080 - $62.95 x 1 (tooth)
13073AA190 - $32.00 x 1 (smooth)
Tensioner: 13033AA042 - $115.00
Crank Seal: 806733030 - $6.59
Crank Bolt 22mm
Cam Seals: 806732150 - $6.15 x 2
Water Pump: A/T: 21111AA290 - $107.50*
Pump Gasket: 21114AA051 - $3.00
Thermostat: 21200AA072 - $13.00
Thermostat Gasket: 21236AA010 - $2.65
Rear Main Seal
Drive Belts 809218270 (iirc) + 73323AA000
Drive Belt (Alternator & Power Steering)
Drive Belt (Air Conditioner)
Valve Cover Gaskets
Spark Plug Tube Seals
Oil Cooler Gasket
Spark Plugs
Spark Plug Wires
Oil Separator Plate
Transmission Filter
Transmission Fluid
Coolant
Coolant Additive
Intake Gaskets
Exhaust Gaskets
Head Gaskets & Bolts
Oil Pan Gasket
O2 Sensor Upstream
O2 Sensor Downstream
Air Filter
 

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1999 Forester S
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530 Posts
I talked to my friend with the heads and he said the car never overheated so the heads didn't warp. Being a poor college student, is there anyway I should do to the junkyard short block to make sure it will be reliable for me? Also do you have a recommendation on an oil separator plate?
It doesn't matter if the engine overheated or not, I am willing to bet my WRX that the heads will not be flat. Find a machinists straight edge (not a ruler) and measure the flatness of the heads. Or, ya know, just take my word for it...


The oil separator plate is not an AOS, it is a factory Subaru part. It lives on the back side of the engine, hidden by the flywheel/TC. They were originally made from plastic, then were switched to a cast aluminum part, and now to a fabricated steel plate.

With the engine out, it costs just a few dollars and a few minutes to replace the rear main seal.
I actually had quite a bit of trouble replacing my rear main seal and both cam seals on my 205k mile EJ253. The rear main is large and was quite stuck. I bought the Lisle seal puller and still almost damaged the seal to the point where I would have had to get creative to remove it.

YMMV

I was told by the owner of Superior Subie in Portland (the fellow who wrote the thread I linked to above) that the crank/cam seals should only be replaced if they show signs of leaking. They are Viton seals, so they should last a good long time. I'm a bit of a perfectionist when it comes to my vehicles, so I went and replaced the seals anyway, but replacing all four took at least an hour and a lot of cussing.
 
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