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Registered
1999 Forester
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57 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 99 Forester with rear disc brakes, I will be swapping in front 05 Legacy GT brakes and im trying to decide what vehicle I should order Braided lines for.... Should I order them for Forester, Impreza, Legacy.... Could you guys help me out :icon_biggrin: Is buying the lines with the PVC coating worth the extra cost?
 

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Premium Member
2007 XT Sport 5MT
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24,015 Posts
buy the braided lines for the 05 LGT, that way you will be sure the caliper fittings are correct to the specific ones being installed. The lengths are pretty much all the same, and the tabs tend to be adjustable along the length of the brake line.
 

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Registered
04 Forester X, MT
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1,039 Posts
Don't bother unless they're coated.
so stainless is not quite so stainless?

what about braided lines for rear drum brake cars? do any of the common kits work for those too or only if you have rear discs? i'm happy with rear drums and wouldn't consider converting; a waste for most imho.
 

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Premium Member
'09 STI
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4,129 Posts
Uncoated lines can collect dirt and corrode. They also can be abrasive against other surfaces.

I think braided lines are for that last few percent in pedal feel improvement. Not necessary for the street.
 

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Premium Member
2008 FSXT 4EAT
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4,143 Posts
I'll also expound on my last post. The chromium in SS is what provides the corrosion resistance. The exposed chromium oxidizes and forms Cr2O3, a passivation layer that protects the material beneath it and returns when the material is scratched. If you see rusty "SS" brake lines, they probably have some carbon in the alloy, which - in my mind - classifies them as cheap-o brake lines.

Personally, I'd want coated lines so they're easier to clean, in case they get coated in dirt, grease, tar, etc, etc, etc. The coating probably provides some abrasion resistance, too.
 

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Premium Member
'09 STI
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4,129 Posts
SS is non-corrosive, and most "dirt" is non-corrosive.
I'll also expound on my last post. The chromium in SS is what provides the corrosion resistance. The exposed chromium oxidizes and forms Cr2O3, a passivation layer that protects the material beneath it and returns when the material is scratched. If you see rusty "SS" brake lines, they probably have some carbon in the alloy, which - in my mind - classifies them as cheap-o brake lines.

Personally, I'd want coated lines so they're easier to clean, in case they get coated in dirt, grease, tar, etc, etc, etc. The coating probably provides some abrasion resistance, too.
Ignorance is bliss even with the ostentatious dissertation. :icon_rolleyes:
 

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Premium Member
'09 STI
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4,129 Posts
O.K. :icon_rolleyes: You can spend your time impressing us with your pointless engineering babble the rest of us will simply buy coated lines. LOL.
 

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Premium Member
2008 FSXT 4EAT
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4,143 Posts
O.K. :icon_rolleyes: You can spend your time impressing us with your pointless engineering babble the rest of us will simply buy coated lines. LOL.
I'm not trying to impress anybody. I'm clearing up the misinformation in your previous posts. I'm chiming in because I have an extensive background in designing SS structures in corrosive environments.
 

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luvin' it
2008 Forester Sports XT 5-speed manual
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815 Posts
Yeah, get the coated SS lines for piece of mind. I'm noticing that some local vendors stock Goodridge brake lines that are not coated with a plastic sheath. It's hard to tell from the packaging if they are coated or not.
 

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Registered
none none
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8,844 Posts
I'm not trying to impress anybody. I'm clearing up the misinformation in your previous posts. I'm chiming in because I have an extensive background in designing SS structures in corrosive environments.
Stainless CAN rust especially in the presence of chlorides and water, depending on the grade. Also any iron/mild steel etc touching it will cause rust stains.

However the coating will especially help stop the braided line from wearing away at anything it rubs against.
 

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Premium Member
2008 FSXT 4EAT
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4,143 Posts
Stainless CAN rust especially in the presence of chlorides and water, depending on the grade. Also any iron/mild steel etc touching it will cause rust stains.
Yes, chloride pitting can occur in some 300 series SS. You're also correct about galvanic corrosion due to the presence of dissimilar metals.
 

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Premium Member
'09 STI
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4,129 Posts
I'm not trying to impress anybody. I'm clearing up the misinformation in your previous posts. I'm chiming in because I have an extensive background in designing SS structures in corrosive environments.
Show me how your posts have any relevance to the O.P.'s question and I'll continue the discussion. Otherwise I suggest you start a new thread in off topic to impress everyone with your knowlege of metallurgy where it's actually applicable. :crazy:

I enjoy reading your condescending remarks. Please enlighten us w/o being ostentatious about corrosive stainless steel.
You can go cheerlead in his new off topic thread. LOL.
 

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Premium Member
'09 STI
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4,129 Posts
Yes, chloride pitting can occur in some 300 series SS. You're also correct about galvanic corrosion due to the presence of dissimilar metals.
Arthrogrian said:
I'm not the one making claims that SS is corrosive. Simply put - it's not.
So which one is it? LOL. Guess you missed that day in school? Good luck in your career. /thread. LOL.
 

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Registered
2002 Forester S
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270 Posts
I dunno who makes ss lines for Subies, but for Detroit iron, Earle's and Russel makes them. I put a set of Earle's ss lines and solo-bleeds on my old IROC, very good stuff.

You might want to see if Earle's or Russel makes them in sets for Subies.

Re corrosion, I live in Cali so no salt on the roads. No corrosin either.
 

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Registered
2002 Forester S
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270 Posts
Solo bleeds make bleeding the lines an easy 1 man job.
 
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