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2003 forester XS
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621 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
so I have done the t-belt , water pump , front and rear diff fluid , doing coolant a trans fluid in spring ---

but the valve adjustments I am a little foggy about when and how necessary it is on a my03 xs with 100K on it


what do all y'all think about this ?
 

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2010 Forester 2.5X
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1,698 Posts
I like to hear more about this. Looking at the maintenance schedule for my2010 it doesn't appear there is a need to adjust values. Only says inspect at 105k miles. Gave me the impression car had hydraulic lifters.
 

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2008 Forester X Premium 5MT
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8,073 Posts
Pic is taken off NASIOC.

Believe it is a 2000 era head. There are a few things in the manual that only say inspect, with no indication to change them. That does not mean don't change them, just means inspect them and change/adjust as needed. I think transmission fluid for a auto falls in that category.
 

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2010 Forester 2.5X
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Thanks for the photo!
I see they are solid lifter type.
I'm going to look for a Haynes or Chilton's repair manual or ? Car is so new I don't think they have one for 2009/10.
Have adjusted valves before, but this looks like half might be done from underneath the car.
 

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1999 Forester
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112 Posts
That's right, your abs (no, not your brakes) will get a good workout! If they're not making noise, though, it's not urgent. I did mine when I replaced the valve cover gaskets and spark plug well seals at around 137K miles. They were all off by a little bit.

I have just a couple of observations on the valve adjustment procedure, which was not unlike other screw adjuster types on which I've worked:

- It's always hard to find TDC using the alignment arrow on the cam sprocket so I stuck a ratchet extension into the spark plug holes and watched as I turned the crankshaft. Just make sure the ratchet is sufficiently long in order to avoid dropping into the combustion chamber.

- Intake valves tend to loosen up over time, while exhaust valves tend to tighten up, therefore, I adjust them to the bottom end and top end of the range, respectively.
 

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2010 Forester 2.5X
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I can relate to adjusting motorcycle valves and finding TDC with a screwdriver.
Just seems like they would need to be adjusted sooner than 105K miles.
It's sounding more and more at 105K not only Timing belt and water pump, but as long as you have the timing belt off and need to adjust valves, just take the head off and put a new head gasket on and adjust the valves with the head off the car.
 

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2008 Forester X Premium 5MT
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^^This is the way I would prefer to do it, look for the slightest sing of a HG leak to justify it and the do it all at once.

"Y" shaped rockers are nothing to fear. They may be actuated by the same arm, that doesn't mean they need to be set "exactly" the same. A few ten thousandths to a thousandth difference wont make much of a difference.
 

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I recently replaced HGs on my 99 Forester and checked the valve adjustments from the shop before installing the heads. It was tricky to check them sitting on the garage floor (hard to adjust camshaft positions w/ nothing to restrain head except my knees!).

Upside down and installed on the engine would be a challenge. I've always thought a slightly loose valve does no harm, except perhaps some warmup noise and have followed that mantra on my Hondas. However, a too tight exhaust valve, not allowing full closure will leak and burn out. Hence, my thought was a little noise may be a good thing.

Whenever I've checked valves on my high mileage (> 150K) Accord and Acura (very easy job), the adjustments were nearly w/i spec, usually no more than 1-2 mils loose. Only issue I noticed was some warmup noise for first 5 mins of driving.

regards
 

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2003 forester XS
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Discussion Starter #13
Pic is taken off NASIOC.

Believe it is a 2000 era head. There are a few things in the manual that only say inspect, with no indication to change them. That does not mean don't change them, just means inspect them and change/adjust as needed. I think transmission fluid for a auto falls in that category.


these look not all that different than any old VW or porsche head I have worked on . but those there is a well documented procedure on finding TDC and which direction and how far to rotate the crank to adjust each set of valves ... and which order to do them in . Does this sort info exist for my foz?
 

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1999 Forester
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I can relate to adjusting motorcycle valves and finding TDC with a screwdriver.
Just seems like they would need to be adjusted sooner than 105K miles.
It's sounding more and more at 105K not only Timing belt and water pump, but as long as you have the timing belt off and need to adjust valves, just take the head off and put a new head gasket on and adjust the valves with the head off the car.
Yes, I think the other issues arise before the valve train causes any problems, and i think most people get away with never having them adjusted. Preemptive head gasket replacement has been discussed. Not sure about the 1st go around at 105K miles, but at 210K, it might be prudent depending on the overall condition of the vehicle.

I'm at 150K on the original head gaskets of a '99 SOHC 2.5L.
 

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2008 Forester X Premium 5MT
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It is all in the service manual, available here. If you wanted to be picky it is really:

Intake:
0.20±0.02 mm (0.0079±0.0008 in)
Exhaust:
0.25±0.02 mm (0.0098±0.0008 in)

Most people are not going to have the "feel" to be that accurate however.
.008" and .010" +/- .001" is all you really need to aim for.



8. Valve Clearance
A: INSPECTION
NOTE:
Inspection and adjustment of the valve clearance should be performed while engine is cold.
1) Set the vehicle on a lift.
2) Lift-up the vehicle.
3) Remove the under cover.
4) Lower the vehicle.
5) Disconnect the ground cable from battery.
6) Remove the timing belt cover (LH).
7) When inspecting the #1 and #3 cylinders;
(1) Disconnect the spark plug cords from spark plugs RH side. <Ref. to IG(H4SO)-5, RH SIDE, REMOVAL, Spark Plug.
(2) Disconnect the PCV hose from rocker cover(RH).
(3) Remove the bolts, and then remove the rocker cover (RH).
8) When inspecting the #2 and #4 cylinders;
(1) Disconnect the spark plug cords from spark
plugs (LH Side). <Ref. to IG(H4SO)-5, LH SIDE,
REMOVAL, Spark Plug.
(2) Disconnect the PCV hose from rocker cover(LH).
(3) Remove the bolts, and then remove therocker cover (LH).
9) Set the #1 cylinder piston to top dead center of compression stroke by rotating crank pulley clockwise using ST. ST 499977100 CRANK PULLEY WRENCH
NOTE:
When arrow mark (A) on the cam sprocket (LH) comes exactly to the top, #1 cylinder piston is brought to the top dead center of compression stroke.
10) Measure the #1 cylinder valve clearance by using thickness gauge.
CAUTION:
• Insert the thickness gauge (A) in as horizontal a direction as possible with respect to the valve stem end face.
• Measure the exhaust valve clearances while lifting-up the vehicle. Valve clearance
Intake:
0.20±0.02 mm (0.0079±0.0008 in)
Exhaust:
0.25±0.02 mm (0.0098±0.0008 in)
11) If necessary, adjust the valve clearance.
12) Similar to measurement procedures used for #1 cylinder, measure the cylinder valve clearances in the following sequence: #3, #2 and #4 cylinder.
NOTE:
• Be sure to set the cylinder pistons to their respective top dead centers on compression stroke before measuring valve clearances.
• To set each cylinder piston to its top dead center on compression stroke in the following sequence:
#3, #2 and #4 cylinder, turn the crank pulley clockwise by every 180° at starting with #1 cylinder piston being on top dead center on compression
stroke.
13) After inspection, install the related parts in the reverse order of removal.
B: ADJUSTMENT
CAUTION:
Adjustment of the valve clearance should be performed while engine is cold.
1) Set the #1 cylinder piston to top dead center of compression stroke by rotating crank pulley clockwise using ST. ST 499977100 CRANK PULLEY WRENCH
NOTE:
When arrow mark (A) on the cam sprocket (LH) comes exactly to the top, #1 cylinder piston is brought to the top dead center of compression
stroke.
2) Adjust the #1 cylinder valve clearance.
(1) Loosen the valve rocker nut and screw.
(2) Place suitable thickness gauge.
(3) While noting the valve clearance, tighten the valve rocker adjusting screw.
(4) When specified valve clearance is obtained, tighten the valve rocker nut.
Tightening torque:
10 N·m (1.0 kgf-m, 7.2 ft-lb)
CAUTION:
• Insert the thickness gauge in as horizontal a direction as possible with respect to the valve stem end face.
• Adjust the exhaust valve clearances while lifting up the vehicle.
Valve clearance
Intake:
0.20±0.02 mm (0.0079±0.0008 in)
Exhaust:
0.25±0.02 mm (0.0098±0.0008 in)
3) Ensure the valve clearances are within specifications.
4) Turn the crankshaft two complete rotations until #1 cylinder piston is again set to the top dead center on compression stroke.
5) Ensure the valve clearances are within specifications. If necessary, readjust the valve clearances.
6) Similar to adjustment procedures used for #1 cylinder, adjust the #3, #2 and #4 cylinder valve clearances.
NOTE:
• Be sure to set the cylinder pistons to their respective top dead centers on compression stroke before adjusting valve clearances.
• To set each cylinder piston to its top dead center on compression stroke in the following sequence: #3, #2 and #4 cylinder, turn the crank pulley clockwise by every 180° at starting with #1 cylinder piston being on top dead center on compression stroke.
 
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