Subaru Forester Owners Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
2017 Forester
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I want to upgrade my brakes on my 2017 Forester Xt, looking for something that will stop better than the factory brakes. What would you recommend ?

Thanks Bob
 

·
Registered
2019 Forester Premium Lineartronic® CVT
Joined
·
324 Posts
RockAuto always has several upgrade options.
 

·
Registered
1998 forester
Joined
·
111 Posts
Your tires also have a lot to do with how well your vehicle stops. In terms of brake components, I have personally used Centric rotors with Stoptech pads. Been using that combo on my wrx for quite a few years as well as what's on the SF after the 4/2 pot change.
 

·
Registered
2017 XT Auto
Joined
·
42 Posts
I also have been using centric with stoptech or hawks previously on my impreza and currently on my Legacy. I too would like to upgrade braking on the my '17XT. only 20k miles though so I'll wait another year for pads and rotors.

To piggy back on OPs question however, what can be done to upgrade the 'spongy' feel? Would SS lines and different fluid be enough, or after market/brembo calipers? I've read the brembo thread and would really like to avoid brackets or knuckle replacements and have also read the XT calipers are pretty decent. I just can't get over the soft feel until I actually get a bite.
 
2017 2.5i Fozy CVT
Joined
·
1,283 Posts
A Cusco MC brake brace (Subispeed is good source,,,)and fresh Silglyde silicone grease on the (cleaned) caliper slide pins.
 

·
Registered
1998 forester
Joined
·
111 Posts
I also have been using centric with stoptech or hawks previously on my impreza and currently on my Legacy. I too would like to upgrade braking on the my '17XT. only 20k miles though so I'll wait another year for pads and rotors.

To piggy back on OPs question however, what can be done to upgrade the 'spongy' feel? Would SS lines and different fluid be enough, or after market/brembo calipers? I've read the brembo thread and would really like to avoid brackets or knuckle replacements and have also read the XT calipers are pretty decent. I just can't get over the soft feel until I actually get a bite.
There's nothing wrong with brackets if you go the aftermarket/brembo route.

Perhaps steel lines and a master cylinder brace may help with your spongey feel.
 

·
Registered
2015 Forester XT Touring
Joined
·
653 Posts
Better tires will improve your stopping. Pads/fluid will help you stop quickly more often at the track.
 

·
Registered
2017 Forester 2.5i CVT
Joined
·
600 Posts
I want to upgrade my brakes on my 2017 Forester Xt, looking for something that will stop better than the factory brakes. What would you recommend ?



Thanks Bob
To stop better than factory, you need better tires and or reduce weight of tue vehicle.

Factory brakes should be able to lock up the wheels to the point of engaging the ABS system. Improving this does nothing. You need to reduce the tire lockup. New tire time.

If brake lockup is not possible, you need to see a mechanic.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2003 EJ20K Forester
Joined
·
326 Posts
Always lots of misinformation in threads like this....

1. If you can lock your tires up, your brakes are fine (however you may not be pleased with the pedal feel, and steps can be made here)
2. SS lines are a scam. They are poly lines covered in an aesthetic steel braid which carries none of the hoop stress from line pressure. A new factory style composite line (steel or nylon braid with rubber matrix) will perform better (less expansion under pressure) than ebay SS lines.
3. Drilled/Slotted/other rotors are a waste of money, and possibly a hazard. Their main benefit is aesthetics. They have their place, but it isn't road cars.
 

·
Registered
MY05 Forester 2.5 XT 5MT
Joined
·
2,732 Posts
You could begin with uprated pads (Ignore the discs, since they don't increase traction, only cooling and if you're not suffering from warping, upgraded discs wont help much)

If you want more or a different pedal feel, consider Impreza WRX calipers but they might mean you fitting different wheels to clear the new calipers, depending on what your particular wheels give you in the way of clearance
 

·
Registered
2018 Forester
Joined
·
148 Posts
[Drilled/Slotted/other rotors are a waste of money, and possibly a hazard. Their main benefit is aesthetics. They have their place, but it isn't road cars.]

I'm hoping to help my braking while towing with the drilled and slotted rotors.
The stock brakes scare me with towing a 1000 lb motorcycle and trailer that has no brakes.
Over heating on the long descent.
stay tuned.
 

·
Registered
MY05 Forester 2.5 XT 5MT
Joined
·
2,732 Posts
@stilup You may want to consider changing the pads to something with a higher rated temperature compound. EBC BlueStuff would be worth a look if they do your fitment.

I would not trust drilled discs, as they can crack and give you a whole load of problems - The exception would be Brembo Sport or DBA as those 2 manufacturers make discs differently and so their drilled version are much less likely to crack.

I run Brembo Sport slotted discs and have been very happy. They are coated so don't rust and high carbon so they last longer than standard discs.

Anything above 1400Lbs and I would definitely recommend trailer brakes and happens to be the law in the UK and other parts of the world.
 

·
Registered
2003 EJ20K Forester
Joined
·
326 Posts
If you're within the factory towing capacity weight wise, you should have to try very hard to run into brake problems. I would descend slowly. Brake horsepower(heat) is just torque x speed, and since you have a set load and distance to go, going slowly will generate less peak brake temps.

If you do this trip often, want to drive downhill faster, or want to spend money, I'd spend on thick vented rotors, thick new metallic pads, and DOT 4 fluid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
if you use the stock type ceramic brake pads, and dont like how quickly you stop, then try the semi metallic pads they will stop more quickly once they get heated up, but make more noise and dust , drilled and slotted rotors may look 'cool" but are weaker and more problematic , solid rotors heat up more quickly and stay hotter, the multi piece hollow style work better, but tend to edge rust more , the flex problem on the master cylinder that so many seem to worry about is the fault of the relatively thin master cylinder sheet metal,
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top