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Registered
2002 Forester L Manual
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40 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I really had the chance to use my AWD earlier this year! I was 3 1/2 to 4 hours from home. I am a musician and had just finished a show and the weather turned bad. I left while it was a mix of rain and sleet, traveling back roads of South Carolina. By the time I got to interstate 85 N there was already 4-6 inches of snow on the roads. One lane of traffic running 25-35mph, with the other lane either covered in snow or just a few ruts in it. I started passing cars and problaby averaged about 45mpg and my 2002 Forester was like a Billy Goat as sure footed as I have ever felt. (I have owned 4wd Bronco ll and Explorer AWD) I could not believe it was eating up the snow!!! 6+ hours later I arrived home safe and sound and worn out!!!

I am looking at buying my next Subi when I hear that Subaru has changed the AWD system on newer models and it was not as good as mine!!!

TELL ME IT ISN'T SO!!!! I still have life in mine (204,000) but it has a bit of rust and I am saving for a newer model. I just want to be sure it will handle that kind of weather as well!!!
 

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Premium Member
2019 Crosstrek 2018 XT
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14,217 Posts
My 18 XT is so much better than my 08 the two are not in the same league,,seriously. The way the new works it always sends the power to the two wheels that have the best traction.

I don't understand where people "hear" this crap.
 

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Registered
2002 Forester L Manual
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40 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Haters!!! I am sold on the Subi for inclement weather! I could not imagine the powers that be going backwards with all the new technology available!
 

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Registered
2015 Forester XT Touring CVT
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767 Posts
@Blueskeys
It all depends if you want long or short answer, but you will come to same conclusion: no, new CVT-AWD systems are not "inferior" to viscous coupling system that you probably have (if it is 2002 manual). For example, viscous coupling was still used in WRX manual and Crosstreck/Impreza manual and it is more mechanical, starting with 50:50 split but it can transfer "only" up to certain percentage to each axle (80-90% from what I remember).
CVT models use electronically controlled multiplate clutches to control torque split (which is usually 60:40 front/rear) and it can transfer higher percentage proactively to each axle.
Competitors are starting from 100:0 or 90:10 so they need slippage to react. Subaru doesn't have that problem.
Subaru CVT-AWD system is simple, fuel efficient and better than most competitors for on-road/bad weather situations, but just not that much better as Subaru marketing is advertising...
 
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