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2017 Forester Touring CVT
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to buy a winter wheel/tire set. TPM's are another $144. It also I have to make an appointment with dealer to program them.
Then they will charge me another $60 to do that.
Worth it or just put a piece of tape over the TPM alert light for a few months ?
Thought fellas ?


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2009 2.5xt 6 Speed Swap version 8 6 speed sti trans with r180
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As long as you don't mind seeing the light on the dash, theres no reason to put up the cash for it. I didn't and it makes no differnce to me. I say no way.

Theres quite a few threads with similar topics.
 

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2008 X 5MT
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Tape. Check pressure once in a while.

204$ in your pocket.
 

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2009 Forester 2.5i Automatic
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I am from the old school. What did we do before TPMS?

Just check your air pressure once a week or so.

I use the scientific method-black tape-works all the time.
 

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2015 Highlander AWD XLE 6AT
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I skipped TPMS sensors on my winter tire and wheel set. However, I did elect to go with high-falootin' green electrical tape to cover the TPMS indicator.

HTH,
Jim / crewzer
 

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2009 2.5xt 6 Speed Swap version 8 6 speed sti trans with r180
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I skipped TPMS sensors on my winter tire and wheel set. However, I did elect to go with high-falootin' green electrical tape to cover the TPMS indicator.

HTH,
Jim / crewzer
Not everyone has that kind of money to be throwing around splurging for green electrical tape crewzer. Jeez what a show off.... lol:D
 

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2017 Forester Touring CVT
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just placed my order with Tire Rack.
Got the very last set of 225/60R17 General Altimax Arctic's they had. Now sold out.
Steal wheels and hub caps. Will have them by Monday. $890 to the door.
Between this and my brand new Toro zero turn snowblower, it will guarantee no snow this year in NJ. LOL

Thanks again fellas.
 

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Probably means thinner. Thinner tires generally do better with more pressure on a smaller contact patch. I stayed with the same width and I crawl all over the place with this thing. Love em.

Which tires did you get?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Probably means thinner. Thinner tires generally do better with more pressure on a smaller contact patch. I stayed with the same width and I crawl all over the place with this thing. Love em.

Which tires did you get?
Was originally going for the Blizzaks. But then I started to dig around a little and noticed the General Altimax Artics getting a lot of accolades. And even scoring higher the. The Bridgestones in a Tire Rack test which may explain why they are now sold out.
Probably means nothing at all in reality but I ended up with the the Artics.


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I have arctics too. They're a copy of a nokian style. Their forte is thick snow but still score well for ice traction. It's almost like having all terrains. Love em. Bkizzaks are great for road ice but a little less string in snow.

Good choice.
 

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2011 Forester 5 Speed Manual
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2009 Forester X Premium
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Altimax Artics are great on the Forester you'll love um! :Banane35:
And after 2 weeks the tire pressure warning light doesn't even bother me so I just decided to forgo the tape.
 

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2014 Forester 2.5i 6 spd
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I've never had to mess with the TPMs. But after I got my first set of extra wheels/tires, I loved it. Took about 15 minutes to change all the tires.
 

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2016 Outback and WRX CVT
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^ Damn! Do you have a lift?!!! That's impressive!

It takes me about 45 minutes from the time I pull the cars out on the driveway to the time I put the last tool back, to do our two cars.

- jack
- breaker bar w/socket
- electric ratchet (I need to take the socket off the breaker bar, so that wastes a little time)
- torque wrench w/socket
- anti-seize


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Was originally going for the Blizzaks. But then I started to dig around a little and noticed the General Altimax Artics getting a lot of accolades. And even scoring higher the. The Bridgestones in a Tire Rack test which may explain why they are now sold out.
Probably means nothing at all in reality but I ended up with the the Artics.
I have arctics too. They're a copy of a nokian style. Their forte is thick snow but still score well for ice traction. It's almost like having all terrains. Love em. Bkizzaks are great for road ice but a little less string in snow.
The General Altimax Arctics are a mold clone of the Gislaved Nordfrost 3, which was very good tire in its day. Both Gislaved and General are under the Continental Tires umbrella. The Nordfrost 3 is a number of generations behind present designs (only 2 generations, in terms of "internally" with in Gislaved), but its basic pattern - a great snow-moving pattern - was also seen with the Nokian Hakka 5 (current top-tier Nokians of this sub-genre is the Hakka 8) as well as the Pirelli Winter Carving and Winter Carving Edge (currently Ice Zero) tires. Of these, the Winter Carving Edge was able to hold on to very respectable finishes in various highly-regarded overseas tests until well into the 2011 test-year (winter of 2011-2012).

[ One thing that remained unclear is whether or not Continental/General continued to update the compounding of the Altimax Arctics since the discontinuation of their Gislaved counterpart. The fact that the Pirelli Winter Carving Edge was able to retain its place among its the top-tier sub-genre counterparts was due to continued tweaks in its compounding over the years. ]

To obtain best ice traction with these tires, they'll need studs, as their compounding is not optimized for friction use in *extreme* cold, and furthermore, their tread lacks the macro/micro developments/improvements of current top-tier "Studless Ice & Snow" friction tires.

Tire Rack continues to sell-out of these tires every winter simply because they are one of the few good choices in this particular sub-genre that's available to us here in North America, and additionally because these tires are very reasonably priced.

Make no mistake, though, they are not considered top-tier in the overall scheme of things, and those Tire Rack results have been the point of many contentions in the enthusiast community.

They're a great tire in their own right, but they're far from the be-all and end-all. :wink: Nevertheless, in the real world, they continue to fare very, very well, and have developed a loyal following that exceeds just that of Subaru owners. They're more than worth their cost, studded or un-studded.

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Probably means thinner. Thinner tires generally do better with more pressure on a smaller contact patch. I stayed with the same width and I crawl all over the place with this thing. Love em.
In terms of running a narrower tire, you're only going to really start seeing differences when you jump "two sizes" - i.e. from a 225 to a 205 or a 235 to 215 jump in section width.

Exactly how this will play out is something that tire testing authorities will need to follow-though and examine.

Remember, however, that the "cutting through the top layer" only works if there's actually something that affords traction underneath. If the surface below does not give the tire any traction, it does no good to cut through the overlying layer.

In most larger municipalities in the lower 48, we see road grooming after a snowstorm has passed, and generally, fresh powder snow and slush overlays a layer that's plowed or otherwise treated, and as-such, we see better traction when the tires cut through the overlying layer.

However, in instances where there's hardpack or glare ice underneath - a common occurrence at interactions of side-streets with the main thoroughfare, it's sometimes possible to see the reverse in-action, and that's where matching the tire's capabilities (i.e. studs versus modern premium "Studless Ice & Snow") to your conditions (i.e. temperature) will show its best worth. :)
 

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^ Wonderful information. Love it when you chime in. So here in Juneau we have lots of snow and slush on the road and these tires dig through it wonderfully to find the traction at the bottom of the rabbit hole. However, In the intersections and plowed areas it's super Icy and traction is at a minimum. They still slip and spin on the ice a bit. I didn't stud mine but I should have. I still might take it over to les schawb while they're still newish and have them stud them.

Maybe you know this Tsi, the only self install tool and studs on the market are the nokian ones. Will they fit any tire? I've looked for a cheap stud tool and studs and that's all I come up with but i'm not sure if they'll even work on the altimax.
 

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2016 Outback and WRX CVT
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^ That's definitely out of the realm of what little knowledge/know-how I have, I'm afraid. I've never tried self-studding or de-studding the tires. :embarrassed: Sorry!

But as for those intersections, that's pretty much the exact reason why I've got studs on my Tribeca. I'm pretty much 85% city streets - and we get pretty good road clearing here in the suburbs of NE-Ohio. Unfortunately, despite that, the intersections of smaller side-streets still slick-over overnight, and with the little girl mostly in my car in the AMs, I compromised on quite a bit of noise in exchange for the ability to get a slightly larger safety margin (so that I can either stop or, if absolutely necessary, get the grip needed to launch through the intersection if I'm about to be rear-ended) for this singular scenario, which I face whenever we have a snow-thaw-freeze scenario (like we have been having this entire past week).

The wifey takes main roadways on her commute, and her car is also set up more for highway. besides that, she won't take the noise of the studs. We're lucky in that we're able to equip our two vehicles with different goals in-mind, as it gives us quite a bit of flexibility. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
^ Damn! Do you have a lift?!!! That's impressive!

It takes me about 45 minutes from the time I pull the cars out on the driveway to the time I put the last tool back, to do our two cars.

- jack
- breaker bar w/socket
- electric ratchet (I need to take the socket off the breaker bar, so that wastes a little time)
- torque wrench w/socket
- anti-seize



Make no mistake, though, they are not considered top tier

They're a great tire in their own right, but they're far from the be-all and end-all. :wink:

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There were no mistakes made, I don't believe, unless I missed it, anyone here said they were "top tier". But thanks for that info anyway !
Lol





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