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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Published on Nov 4, 2014
Find the Perfect Tire: Find the right tires for your vehicle - Canadian Tire

Many people believe that a set of all-season tires will get them through the winter. We put three sets of tires through rigorous testing at a world- renowned proving ground 160 kilometers south of the Arctic Circle to reveal how All Season, winter rated All Weather and dedicated Winter Tires perform under winter driving conditions. We started by comparing the braking capabilities of the three tires in frigid, snowy winter conditions. Each set was mounted on the same car and stopping distance was measured from 40 kilometers an hour to 0 kilometers an hour. Winter tires only took 19.2 meters to come to a complete stop. The winter rated All Weather Tires took 21.2 meters to come to a complete stop. Not bad. But not as good as the dedicated Winter Tire performance. The all-season tires on our test car took 24.5 meters to come to a complete stop. That's almost a 22 percent difference in stopping distance. Next we compared the tires traction in snow by running our test vehicle through a 90 degree radius turn at 40 kilometers an hour. The winter tires performed best, executing the turn with no loss of traction. The winter-rated All Weather Tires took the turn, but experienced a bit of over-steer with that back end losing traction. The All Season Tires, however, weren't up to the task and our test car did not make it though the turn at speed, losing traction and experiencing a lot of oversteer. Our third test is to meant to simulate handling in an emergency situation. A slalom course was set up with pylons to create quick directional changes often encounter in winter driving. Our test car ran though the course at 40 kilometers hour with the Winter Tires installed. They made it through the slalom with no problem. The same car with the winter-rated All Weather Tires installed was under control, but our test driver had to work a lot harder and handling stability was compromised. Finally we put our test car with All Season Tires through the course. As you can see, the All Season Tires couldn't hold the course at test speed and exhibited unacceptable handling in real-world winter driving conditions. The conclusion of our controlled winter tests showed just how poorly All Season Tires brake, corner and handle under winter driving conditions in comparison to a true dedicated winter tire. But what about when the weather starts to warm up above 7 degrees Celsius? When you compare our three sets of tires under warmer conditions on dry pavement, the opposite happens. Of the three, the All Season Tires performed best on dry pavement. All Weather Tires performed second-best and Winter Tires came in third. When you look at braking and handling under wet, rainy conditions, the All Seasons performed best and the Winter Tires having the worse results. The conclusion? For typical snowy Canadian winters when temperatures dip below 7 degrees Celsius and snow is common, a dedicated Winter Tire is best and safest option. But whatever conditions you find yourself driving in, you'll find the best selection of Winter Tires for all types of conditions at Canadian Tire.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44sT6Ew12Us
 

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2017 Forester Touring 2.5 CVT
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Discussion Starter #3
Published on Nov 4, 2014
Find the Perfect Tire: Find the right tires for your vehicle - Canadian Tire

Canadian Tire took three popular types of light truck tires to a renowned proving ground 160 kilometers south of the Arctic Circle and ran them through a series of tests to discover which tires performed best in wet, dry, snow, and ice conditions. We tested all terrain, winter rated all terrain, and dedicated winter tires. At first glance there is no large difference in the appearance of the tires. All have big deep treads and large tread blocks that look like they can tackle anything. So is there a difference? The answer is yes. The biggest variable is the chemistry of the rubber compound used in each tire. All terrain tires have a rubber compound that is designed for warmer weather use. Dedicated winter tires have a compound that grips better in colder temperatures and a tread pattern that is better suited for traction on snow and ice. Although winter rated all terrain tires can be used all year round, they offer only mediocre performance in winter and summer conditions. Our first test measured the braking performance of our three tires from 40 kilometers an hour to a dead stop on a snow packed course. The dedicated winter tires came to a full stop in 28 meters. The winter rated all terrain tires took 39 meters to come to a complete stop; a reasonable distance but not as short as winter tires. The all terrain tires took 56 meters to stop! That is an astonishing 50% stopping difference between our dedicated winter tire and our all terrain tire. Next we compared the tires traction in snow by running our SUV through a 90 degree radius turn at 40 kilometers an hour. The winter tires performed best, executing the corner cleanly. The winter rated all terrain tires did reasonably well on the turn with only a minor oversteer. The all terrain tires proved more problematic in the turn and experienced a dramatic understeer. Finally, we drove each set of tires to their limits on our customized road course. Our test driver provided his opinion on each tire's traction, control, and stability. The results were conclusive. Dedicated winter tires provide superior traction and control in cold, snowy conditions. As we've shown, all terrain tires don't provide the braking, cornering, or handling capabilities necessary for safe winter driving especially when compared to our dedicated winter tire. The conclusion? For typical snowy, icy, Canadian winters, when temperatures dip below seven degrees celsius, winter tires are the best and safest choice for driving and you'll find the best selection of light truck tires for all types of conditions at Canadian Tire!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ahrlD40so4
 

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Registered
2017 Forester Touring 2.5 CVT
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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Tire Safety & Aging

Tires Age Dangerously


"77 percent of the tire claims came from five hot-climate states (including California) and 84 percent of these claims were for tires more than six years old. "


Tire Safety | Safety Research & Strategies, Inc.

Effects of Nitrogen Inflation on Tire Aging and
Performance


CONCLUSIONS
The overall conclusion of the study is: When N2 is used as the inflation media, the
change in rubber properties is significantly slowed down or even halted.

http://www.getnitrogen.org/pdf/FordBaldwinResearchRaper.pdf

The biggest advantages - improved tire life

"Experts in the tire industry indicate that oxidative aging is one of the primary causes of decreased tire life. Oxidative aging is caused by the diffusion of oxygen from the pressurized air cavity of the tire to the outside atmosphere. Tests have shown that if tires are inflated with nitrogen, there is a significant reduction in tire failure."

http://www.innovativebalancing.com/Nitrogen.htm

Clearing the Air About Nitrogen Tire Inflation

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=191&currentpage=73&

Differences in the laboratory test performance of tires when inflated with gas containing different
ratios of nitrogen to oxygen.


http://www.nhtsa.gov/DOT/NHTSA/NRD/Multimedia/PDFs/Crash Avoidance/2009/811094.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Difference Between Summer, All Weather, and Winter Tires
By Canadian Tire
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44sT6Ew12Us

Published on Nov 4, 2014
Find the Perfect Tire: http://tires.canadiantire.ca/en/tires

Many people believe that a set of all-season tires will get them through the winter. We put three sets of tires through rigorous testing at a world- renowned proving ground 160 kilometers south of the Arctic Circle to reveal how All Season, winter rated All Weather and dedicated Winter Tires perform under winter driving conditions. We started by comparing the braking capabilities of the three tires in frigid, snowy winter conditions. Each set was mounted on the same car and stopping distance was measured from 40 kilometers an hour to 0 kilometers an hour. Winter tires only took 19.2 meters to come to a complete stop. The winter rated All Weather Tires took 21.2 meters to come to a complete stop. Not bad. But not as good as the dedicated Winter Tire performance. The all-season tires on our test car took 24.5 meters to come to a complete stop. That's almost a 22 percent difference in stopping distance. Next we compared the tires traction in snow by running our test vehicle through a 90 degree radius turn at 40 kilometers an hour. The winter tires performed best, executing the turn with no loss of traction. The winter-rated All Weather Tires took the turn, but experienced a bit of over-steer with that back end losing traction. The All Season Tires, however, weren't up to the task and our test car did not make it though the turn at speed, losing traction and experiencing a lot of oversteer. Our third test is to meant to simulate handling in an emergency situation. A slalom course was set up with pylons to create quick directional changes often encounter in winter driving. Our test car ran though the course at 40 kilometers hour with the Winter Tires installed. They made it through the slalom with no problem. The same car with the winter-rated All Weather Tires installed was under control, but our test driver had to work a lot harder and handling stability was compromised. Finally we put our test car with All Season Tires through the course. As you can see, the All Season Tires couldn't hold the course at test speed and exhibited unacceptable handling in real-world winter driving conditions. The conclusion of our controlled winter tests showed just how poorly All Season Tires brake, corner and handle under winter driving conditions in comparison to a true dedicated winter tire. But what about when the weather starts to warm up above 7 degrees Celsius? When you compare our three sets of tires under warmer conditions on dry pavement, the opposite happens. Of the three, the All Season Tires performed best on dry pavement. All Weather Tires performed second-best and Winter Tires came in third. When you look at braking and handling under wet, rainy conditions, the All Seasons performed best and the Winter Tires having the worse results. The conclusion? For typical snowy Canadian winters when temperatures dip below 7 degrees Celsius and snow is common, a dedicated Winter Tire is best and safest option. But whatever conditions you find yourself driving in, you'll find the best selection of Winter Tires for all types of conditions at Canadian Tire.
 
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