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Registered
2001 SOLD!
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1,420 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here is a video I made to remove and repair a leaky oil pump. It's the same procedure to change a timing belt and water pump.

Enjoy!!!





 

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2003 xs
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39 Posts
Great Video!Thanks for sharing

BTW,what brand tool set are you using? And I'm thinking of buying a compressor, I know the bigger the better but could you advice me how powerful and how big the tank is enough for home use?

Thanks,
 

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2006 Forester XT
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658 Posts
Fantastic series!

Recorded them to refer to 'when the time comes'.

You made it look so simple, I'm much more confident now.

Thanks again.
 

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2005 Sequoia, V70R auto
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2,885 Posts
Wow, one handed. I'm impressed. Thanks for the videos. I wonder how much more difficult it is with a DOHC.
 

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Premium Member
2014 Impreza Ltd CVT
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3,363 Posts
VERY VERY NICE ........

Many ways to do the same thing, but so long as the job gets done properly, It's correct.

My own 2 differences come when I remove the crank bolt. I lay the breaker bar, with a pipe on the end, on the ground headed down from the drivers side. Then I hit the starter once and quick. Breaks it loose every time. Done this since MY90 Legacy LS wagon on through every Subaru I have owned or serviced since.

When putting on the timing belt, I have all the top pulleys on first including the 'pinned' tensioner. Then after routing the timing belt around them all including the water pump, I put on the toothed pulley second to last then the bottom smooth pulley last like you did. It prevents the belt from jumping a tooth on the drivers side.

But as I said to each their own. If done properly and works, there can be MANY ways to do the same task.

You did mention the crank bolt torque, 130 ft lbs. This ia VERY IMPORTANT. If not torqued properly and it comes loose, it will ruin the woodruff key and round out the gulley in the crankshaft. That can be either and expensive repair, crank replacement or engine replacement depending on the amount of damage.
 

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2006 Forester
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657 Posts
AC/DC:Banane08:

Thanks for posting the videos. I'm coming up on the 105K mile mark and have had this job on my mind lately. If you can do it one-handed with a video camera in the other, and within 50 minutes...this gives me hope.

Are there any other parts you recommend, other than the water pump, to replace with the belt?
 

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2001 SOLD!
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1,420 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
AC/DC:Banane08:

Thanks for posting the videos. I'm coming up on the 105K mile mark and have had this job on my mind lately. If you can do it one-handed with a video camera in the other, and within 50 minutes...this gives me hope.

Are there any other parts you recommend, other than the water pump, to replace with the belt?
If you are comfortable with changing the timing belt, just change that. It's very rare a Subaru water pump goes south. Just do the belt and call it a day. Why??? It's easy to get to the pump anyways!!!

I would also look into the O2 sensor. They should be changed every 100 000 miles.
 

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2008 LL Bean (4EAT)
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4,909 Posts
Those were really good videos, and I saved the YouTube links. I think there is a commercial market for such information. You could document many of the maintenance and repair actions that you routinely do on Foresters, put them on a DVD, and sell them.

In my world of vintage BMW motorcycles, for instance, a 2-DVD set on rebuilding the engine sells for $73 and there are DVDs for many other actions:
BMW Motorcycle instructional videos to restore your bike.
 

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2006 Forester
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657 Posts
Thanks Huck! I replaced the O2 sensor and plugs last month.

I got a T-belt and crank seal, and will be replacing them in another month or two. After watching your videos again, I can't wait to do this job. I mean it.


If you are comfortable with changing the timing belt, just change that. It's very rare a Subaru water pump goes south. Just do the belt and call it a day. Why??? It's easy to get to the pump anyways!!!

I would also look into the O2 sensor. They should be changed every 100 000 miles.
 

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1999 Forester
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20 Posts
HI! First post here.

Thanks so much for the videos. There's a little place in heaven reserved for people like you. ;) My wife's '99 is overdo for a timing belt change; I did a search and found this thread, and joined the forum.

A further question, if you don't mind: Some the the "timing belt kits" available include the crankshaft seal and the camshaft seals, on the theory that you might was well swap 'em out while you have the cover off. If one were to do this, how do you deal with the driver's side camshaft, given that you need to hold the sprocket (and the shaft) in place with the socket and breaker bar to keep it from moving (as explained in the video)?
 

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2001 SOLD!
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1,420 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
HI! First post here.

Thanks so much for the videos. There's a little place in heaven reserved for people like you. ;) My wife's '99 is overdo for a timing belt change; I did a search and found this thread, and joined the forum.

A further question, if you don't mind: Some the the "timing belt kits" available include the crankshaft seal and the camshaft seals, on the theory that you might was well swap 'em out while you have the cover off. If one were to do this, how do you deal with the driver's side camshaft, given that you need to hold the sprocket (and the shaft) in place with the socket and breaker bar to keep it from moving (as explained in the video)?
Wrap your old timing belt around the camshaft gear and hold it with a C-clamp. Then find something on the engine to hold the timing belt while you loosen the bolt.
 

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Premium Member
2008 Forester X Premium 5MT
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8,073 Posts
On a sohc you let the cam rotate to where ever it wants to go, then simply turn it back to align the timing mark when done.

I suggest breaking the cam shaft bolt loose before taking the t-belt off.

When you have the timing marks lined up the engine is at a service position with the pistons 1/2 way down the cylinder which allows the cam to spin with out fear of valve to piston contact.
 

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1999 Forester
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20 Posts
Thanks for the replies; the interference with the pistons was what I was worried about; glad this isn't an issue. I'll go ahead and change the water pump while I'm in there; I'm the one who'll have to go pick her up if the pump goes (BTDT, on her last car :icon_wink: At least that car announced the WP failure by having the fan spray coolant all over the engine compartment).
 
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