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2001 SOLD!
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1,420 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Thanks to Peaty giving me good info on doing the job. Thanks peaty your awesome :rock:

I disconnected the battery and left the headlights on to drain any residual current.

Then I removed all the stuff required to get the job done. The crank pulley needed a little more power to remove the 22mm bolt so a cheater bar was used. :censored:

Here are some pics with the 2.5 N/A front end taken apart to access the water pump.

Fully stripped front end.







New pump and crank seal installed.





Timing belt installed. I had the hardest time getting the belt on, so i loosened the cogged idler left of the water pump pulley. Then i slipped the belt over the smooth pump pulley. Notice the Allen key holding the Belt tensioner piston.










The OEM Timing belt is awesome. I really suggest using this part since it had the timing marks on the belt itself.

passenger side timing mark





crank timing mark




driver side timing mark





Full view of belt installed



View of Belt tensioner with Allen key removed.



I then flushed out the radiator. I never saw something so clean in my life. No deposits are crud coming out. Like new.

I also cleaned out the rad core with compressed air. I did the same with the condenser blowing air towards the front side of the car. A lot of crap came out :icon_eek:

I then inspected the cleanliness with a light behind as i looked through. A/C should be good this summer. :icon_cool:

All major and important bolts were torqued to the specified requirements. If you are good at wrenching, this is a pretty straight forward job.

After all the cooling system was buttoned up, i made a 50/50 mixture using OEM Scoob coolant with distilled water. Man is this stuff so dark green. Perfect for St-Patties day :biggrin:

Prior to pouring it into the rad, i also poured in the conditioner per instructions on the TSB that peaty sent me.

Then I started her up and ran it at 2000rpm's for 5 mins. Once heated up i knew it was all good to put the rad cap on. I never seen an engine as simple. I checked the hoses to make it burp and nothing came up. VW's are a nightmare for burping.


I've wrenched on VW's and all i can say is that the Subaru is way easier and probably one of the easiest engines to work on.
 

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2001 SOLD!
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1,420 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
One more thing. I also notice a very responsive and smooth engine afterwards. Probably due to an ECU reboot and fresh timing belt. It used to garble when I would let go of the accelerator. Old timing belt must have been a little stretched and changing the timing a bit.

Now it purs like a kitten at idle and pulls well under WOT. :woohoo: :Banane35:
 

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admin
2019 3.6R & 98 Forester Atlanta, GA
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7,183 Posts
Congrats on doing it yourself. You make it look easy.:icon_biggrin:
 

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Premium Member
2014 Impreza Ltd CVT
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3,363 Posts
Very good and YES it is Very Easy. Done it since MY90 Legacy LS wagon. The 2.2L is similar to the 2.5L SOHC. Tensioner was biggest change there. around the 1997 year for the 2.2L then same tensioner carried into the 2.5L SOHC.

I usually start it also when I get the timing belt on and tensioned and radiator filled, to ensure the timing is correct. Granted the ALT and a few other lights come on, but it's easier than removing it all again.

By the way, ensure you torqued the crankshaft pulley properly. Chilton's, Hayes and some early Subaru manuals have the wrong spec. It should be
177 N·m (18.0 kgf-m, 130.2 ft-lb).
 

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2001 SOLD!
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Discussion Starter #5
I usually start it also when I get the timing belt on and tensioned and radiator filled, to ensure the timing is correct. Granted the ALT and a few other lights come on, but it's easier than removing it all again.

By the way, ensure you torqued the crankshaft pulley properly. Chilton's, Hayes and some early Subaru manuals have the wrong spec. It should be
177 N·m (18.0 kgf-m, 130.2 ft-lb).
I did one full turn to line up the timing marks again by hand to see if there was any weird feeling coming from the ratchet.

Once all the timing belt was tensioned, I started it and stopped it within 5 seconds max. to check before going any further. If so it would have been easier than emptying the cooling system again.

Yup, the crank pulley is torqued to 130.2 ft/lb
 

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Administrator
2018 2.5i Premium CVT
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18,452 Posts
Great job. I've only done one timing belt, on a Mazda 626, and it was not a fun piece of work.

I'm surprised that you got nice smooth response from a reset ECU. My experience has been just the opposite. Thought I'd killed the thing for a few startups till it relearned.
 

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Casper reincarnated
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2,271 Posts
Did you inspect the hoses while you had it apart?

I have been advised to do mine when I have the belt changed in a few weeks time as they are the original hoses.
I don't if the weather in our respective countries plays a part in the time interval between hose changes or not.

I helped a mechanic mate do the belt change on my old Holden VL Commodore and it was a painful exercise as the belt and pulleys weren't marked as easily as the Subaru in your pics, we had to count teeth on the belt - align pulleys etc and I vowed never again after that one.
 

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2001 SOLD!
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Discussion Starter #8
I checked the hoses and they were in very good condition. I do believe the rubber they use today is way better then the yesteryears.
 

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2006 Forester
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662 Posts
I love seeing this stuff. Kudos to a job well done!

Was this a weekend job, or how long did it take you? What tools were you glad you had, or were the most helpful? Which pulleys did you have to specifically align to the timing belt marks, and were there reference marks on the pulleys? And what's a TSB...The Subaru Bible?
 

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2002 Forester L Automagical
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315 Posts
that is an easy job, and good documentation. One trick I learned from a scooby tech that works very well is to take a breaker bar with a cheater bar on that and lay it on the frame rail (watch out for the A/C line) on the passengers side and tap the starter to break the crank pully loose. It works great. But I claim no responsibility if anyone screws it up (Anyone can srew anything up if they try hard enough).
 

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2001 SOLD!
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Discussion Starter #13
I love seeing this stuff. Kudos to a job well done!

Was this a weekend job, or how long did it take you? What tools were you glad you had, or were the most helpful? Which pulleys did you have to specifically align to the timing belt marks, and were there reference marks on the pulleys? And what's a TSB...The Subaru Bible?
I had a basic metric ratchet set in 3/8 and 1/4 box size. I had a 1/2 " breaker bar and 22 mm socket for the crank pulley.

I also had 2 torque wrenches to meet the torque requirements. Was very easy to do indeed.

I had it all stripped including crank seal removal and water pump in 2 hours. My first time doing a scoob so i was a little more careful. What took the longest was emptying the rad and cooling system.

Putting it back together was simple. It took me 4 hours total!!!!

Instructions that peaty sent me were very clear. Timing marks are clearly visible on the pulleys. TSB= Technical Service Bulletin that Subaru issues to fix a discrepancy.
 

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30 Meters
2006 XTi - VF39 Protune!
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6,121 Posts
that is an easy job, and good documentation. One trick I learned from a scooby tech that works very well is to take a breaker bar with a cheater bar on that and lay it on the frame rail (watch out for the A/C line) on the passengers side and tap the starter to break the crank pully loose. It works great. But I claim no responsibility if anyone screws it up (Anyone can srew anything up if they try hard enough).
Done that worked well!

Just don't start the vehicle!
 

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I posted in the Newby area asking if $850 was too much for this job, but at $250+ for parts, it may be a little high, but not much.

My Scooby has 100,000 on it and I've never changed the timing belt.

I am not a mechanic--I change my own oil, coolant, plugs, brakes, etc...., but I think I'd be way over my head on this without someone knowledgeable nearby to help out. I guess, I'll be breaking out the checkbook.
 

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2003 Forester XS
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804 Posts
bah how much does a water pump cost? I heard it was a somewhat of a pain to remove on Subaru engines?

Anything else to change while doing the timing belt? I'm near the mark for the change.
 

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2001 SOLD!
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Discussion Starter #19
bah how much does a water pump cost? I heard it was a somewhat of a pain to remove on Subaru engines?

Anything else to change while doing the timing belt? I'm near the mark for the change.
Subaru engines are the easiest to work on. Pump removal was a cinch.
 

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30 Meters
2006 XTi - VF39 Protune!
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6,121 Posts
Other things while doing the timing belt... From past experiences of things going wrong down there. I'd change the crank/cam seals. Cheap n easy to replace. Water pump, belt tensioner pulley.

If you do have superduper mileage change the oil pump.

Despite all of this...My EJ18 on my 1st Impreza I only replaced the timing belt, and crank seal. Nothing else went bad on it. I traded it in at a mere 250,000 miles.
 
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