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2015 Forester 2.0XT H-CVT
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363 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My second concern is performance in winter on snow - the car is all over the place on the road, even at low speeds. I have never experienced this level of instability in any other vehicle I have owned.
After riding on snow in our Forester, my wife refuses to drive a Subaru.
You’re not impressed by Subaru in the snow?

By the way, our friend with an AWD Toyota Sienna couldn’t even pull into and out of his parking spot during this trip, we had to shovel him out. Toyota uses their same AWD system in the rav4, highlander, and sienna.

Also, we rescued a Jeep that got stuck going down a hill, and then drove up... that same hill. We have 3 Subaru’s in this video. The charcoal grey one is completely stock including tires, yoko G91’s.

https://youtu.be/Yj2Lz5ePPXU


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2018 Forester
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305 Posts
Cool video. IMO driving in fresh powder is not as challenging as the next day when the sun and salt start melting the snow into a slush compound that hardens in areas. It is like the difference between running on powder versus running on wet ice. So the ironic thing is folks see a huge snow dump and drive very carefully, when the fresh powder is very forgiving, then the next day when it is sunny, less snow, but slushy, they start driving aggressive because it is a nice day out, then they hit a corner too fast or brake too quickly and they slide out. (these comments are for paved roads)

BTW I like all the videos you put out.
 

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2015 Forester 2.0XT H-CVT
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363 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you SFHub! Thanks for pointing that out. Probably even worse when that powder melts and then freezes over again, making it super duper challenging!

In this video, atleast we are able to compare the Subaru’s to the Jeep that got stuck and all the cars that were stranded in their parking spots


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2016 Forester
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115 Posts
I read the original post in the closed thread, and I think there had to have been something wrong with his Forester. I also have a 2016 with the Bridgestone tires. They have 7/32nds remaining at 30,000 miles and the Forester handles better in snow than any other vehicle I've driven in the snow, quite opposite to the experience he expressed.
 

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2016 Forester
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115 Posts
Cool video. IMO driving in fresh powder is not as challenging as the next day when the sun and salt start melting the snow into a slush compound that hardens in areas. It is like the difference between running on powder versus running on wet ice. So the ironic thing is folks see a huge snow dump and drive very carefully, when the fresh powder is very forgiving, then the next day when it is sunny, less snow, but slushy, they start driving aggressive because it is a nice day out, then they hit a corner too fast or brake too quickly and they slide out.
I also find it ironic that the best tires for snow and ice are usually the worst tires for wet traction. Several people in my area swear by snow tires snow tires for the winter, but our roads are wet or wet and slushy far more frequently than they are covered by dry snow or ice in the winter. I think an all season tire that compromises a small amount of snow and ice traction for far better wet traction is a better overall choice.

I agree that it often seems that people drive based on what is falling out of the sky while ignoring what is on the surface of the road. I've had cars slowed to a crawl because of falling snow while the road conditions were still good, and been passed in the sunshine by rear-wheel drive cars doing 70 while I can't maintain traction in my front-wheel drive car doing 60.
 

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2006 Forester 2,5 XT, LPG automatic
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10 Posts
I also find it ironic that the best tires for snow and ice are usually the worst tires for wet traction. Several people in my area swear by snow tires snow tires for the winter, but our roads are wet or wet and slushy far more frequently than they are covered by dry snow or ice in the winter. I think an all season tire that compromises a small amount of snow and ice traction for far better wet traction is a better overall choice.

I agree that it often seems that people drive based on what is falling out of the sky while ignoring what is on the surface of the road. I've had cars slowed to a crawl because of falling snow while the road conditions were still good, and been passed in the sunshine by rear-wheel drive cars doing 70 while I can't maintain traction in my front-wheel drive car doing 60.

Try Nokain WR A4 or WR D 4.

Got WR A4 and it's really good on wet.
 
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