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2008 Forester
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65 Posts
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hi, I recently bought a subaru forester XT 2009 version and between 2000-4000RPM there is very small trace of oil burning on the side of the engine between the Battery and the engine. i tested twice on empty national road 2 days in row. i used toilet paper to clean the area and tested it again this evening. dont see dripping oil anywhere just burtn oil steam( vapour) somewhere from the area ( cam cover with 3 bolts on??? ) just below the Battery right behind the plastic cover of the pulleys.i noticed the parts on the engine in this area have gaskets. also since i bought engine RPM temporary stuck at high and felt sudden loss of power for more than 10 seconds on two occasions. i uploaded temporary video on youtube which was recorded from the underneath the car. please watch it and see . Thank you and please excuse my poor English :|

Youtube link is :
 

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2012 XT Touring 4EAT
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3,750 Posts
<snip>there is very small trace of oil burning on the side of the engine between the Battery and the engine. . . dont see dripping oil anywhere just burtn oil steam( vapour) somewhere from the area ( cam cover with 3 bolts on??? ) just below the Battery right behind the plastic cover of the pulleys.
Almost certainly the leak is from the valve cover or the front spark plug seal. Those are common leak spots - the oil escapes in small quantities - just enough to make vapor or smoke. The exhaust is down below - perfect for frying oil.

The only other possible leak spot in this area is the front cam seals - one for each cam sprocket. For a 2009 XT, the seals are quite good quality so leaking from these seals would be unusual. To check, simply remove the driver's side timing belt cover. There should be oil visible on the forward face of the cylinder head.

One more thing: Are you sure it's oil? Subaru plastic-tanked radiators have a finite life - yours is probably living on borrowed time. The leak at the top-tank-to-core seam and the bottom-tank-to-core seam. This leakage can continue for a while without being noticeable - just little whiffs of steam, when you're not looking. Best way to check is to mark the level in the overflow and then watch carefully over a week or so. Does the overflow coolant level go up when hot . . . and down when cold . . . and return to the same level each time? If not, or if the coolant level trend is downward, you have a leaking radiator (and you still may be leaking oil).
 
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