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Lane centering works pretty well on my 2020 Premium. I just don't have opportunity to use it a lot. But it didn't ping pong me. In riding the always-under-construction Houston roads, I've noted that the cameras don't always get lanes in bad conditions, or on really big highways (we have a few...) where the stripes don't match the seams in the concrete, sometimes it gets confused. but even then the lane centering seems fine, the lane keep is more likely to give a slight nudge then recognize its mistake. There is one curved pavement section with unmatched line that gets it every day on the way home, but I don't even notice it any more. Just a slight nudge and then it is fine, doesn't even affect my path. I'm an attentive driver, and I still like the features because, as others have pointed out, there are a lot of morons on the road. I can make sure I don't cause an accident, but I can't control everyone around me, so I'll take all the assist I can get. If you don't like it, just turn it off. Not sure why it's that much of an issue.
 

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2020 Subaru Forester Sport - Ice Silver Metallic, Option pkg 24.
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172 Posts
I don't know if the sport has the lane centering feature. It is supposed to keep you in the center of the lane. I know that the Forester Touring has it. It will be on the steering wheel.
This is my steering wheel.
Interesting. That's not how it is supposed to work. Lane Centering can be engaged only if adaptive cruise control is first engaged. Lane Departure Prevention can operate without cruise control.

If it's not behaving as you think it should, a conversation with your dealer would be the next step.
Ok so experimenting on the way home just now and it only seems to work when I have adaptive cruise control active. If I disengage adaptive cruise control then the car behaves like keep lane assist aka ping ponging left and right. Is this true with everyone else with this feature?
 

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2019 Forester Limited
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219 Posts
This is my steering wheel.

Ok so experimenting on the way home just now and it only seems to work when I have adaptive cruise control active. If I disengage adaptive cruise control then the car behaves like keep lane assist aka ping ponging left and right. Is this true with everyone else with this feature?
What I wrote is distilled from the 2020 eyesight manual. Would be good to read it through, as tortured as the writing is.
 

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2011 Forester 2.5X Automatic
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87 Posts
That would be an incredibly exceptionally poor choice from a financial point of view. And this answer is for anyone considering doing this.

I'm assuming you have your present Foz on a nice, fat, long-term car loan. I'll bet your current balance is quite high ...most of the payment in the early part of any loan goes to pay down the interest ....the principle stays relatively untouched. The problem here is the depreciation on you car; its value is dropping a lot faster than the reduction in the principle of your loan. Dollars to donuts the trade amount offered on your current Foz won't completely cover the balance on your current auto loan. So what happens? No sweatskies ...the dealer will take care of that easy-peasy; they'll just cut you a new loan for the new car PLUS add on to that new principle amount any "leftover" unpaid principle from your current loan. Sweet deal ...no muss, no fuss. Right? Except now that new car you just bought has cost you not only the sweet deal you just couldn't resist but ...the added left over principle amount of that nasty one year old car you just traded. What's the expression? A fool and his money are soon parted? Aesop I believe it was ...

Do. Not. Do. This.

You mentioned the key factor in all of this mess: depreciation. Automobiles depreciate faster than an anchor dropped off a boat. If you have a long term auto loan with a high principle (you made a very small down payment) there is a very good possibility at some point during the life of the loan you will owe more on the car than it's worth; NOT GOOD. And that can happen very easily and very quickly. So is this a big deal? Not unless you like to buy new cars frequently in which case the remaining principles just get tacked on to new loans and that is a stupendously dumb thing to do. The other, sneaky, aspect of this "upside down world" (to borrow a term from "Stranger Things") is your insurance company. We never think about accidents. But they happen. That's when your insurance company steps from behind the curtain. Today, with all the "high tech" crap loaded into cars, it really doesn't take much to total a relatively new vehicle; simply blow the airbag system and you are well on your way, if not there fully, to a total write off. Enter your insurance company to the rescue. But maybe not. You see your insurance company isn't going to pay your outstanding loan amount ...no ...they are going to pay what they determine was the value of the vehicle when it met its demise. If it's more than what you owe on the loan? Cool beans. If not ...guess who gets left holding the bag for the remaining balance? You ...with nary a thing to show for it.

So please folks ...lets think about this quick trade up stuff. YOU will be the one getting screwed while the dealer gets not only another new car sold but also reaps the finance charges on the new big(ger) loan you just signed on to.

The smartest thing to do? Pay off that depreciating liability called an automobile as fast as you can ...make additional principle payments and keep the loan value less than the car value or at least close. In the future? Buy used ...2-3 year old vehicles have taken the big depreciation hit courtesy the original owner and you can get new car rates on these vehicles as well.
 

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2020 Subaru Forester Sport - Ice Silver Metallic, Option pkg 24.
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172 Posts
That would be an incredibly exceptionally poor choice from a financial point of view. And this answer is for anyone considering doing this.

I'm assuming you have your present Foz on a nice, fat, long-term car loan. I'll bet your current balance is quite high ...most of the payment in the early part of any loan goes to pay down the interest ....the principle stays relatively untouched. The problem here is the depreciation on you car; its value is dropping a lot faster than the reduction in the principle of your loan. Dollars to donuts the trade amount offered on your current Foz won't completely cover the balance on your current auto loan. So what happens? No sweatskies ...the dealer will take care of that easy-peasy; they'll just cut you a new loan for the new car PLUS add on to that new principle amount any "leftover" unpaid principle from your current loan. Sweet deal ...no muss, no fuss. Right? Except now that new car you just bought has cost you not only the sweet deal you just couldn't resist but ...the added left over principle amount of that nasty one year old car you just traded. What's the expression? A fool and his money are soon parted? Aesop I believe it was ...

Do. Not. Do. This.

You mentioned the key factor in all of this mess: depreciation. Automobiles depreciate faster than an anchor dropped off a boat. If you have a long term auto loan with a high principle (you made a very small down payment) there is a very good possibility at some point during the life of the loan you will owe more on the car than it's worth; NOT GOOD. And that can happen very easily and very quickly. So is this a big deal? Not unless you like to buy new cars frequently in which case the remaining principles just get tacked on to new loans and that is a stupendously dumb thing to do. The other, sneaky, aspect of this "upside down world" (to borrow a term from "Stranger Things") is your insurance company. We never think about accidents. But they happen. That's when your insurance company steps from behind the curtain. Today, with all the "high tech" crap loaded into cars, it really doesn't take much to total a relatively new vehicle; simply blow the airbag system and you are well on your way, if not there fully, to a total write off. Enter your insurance company to the rescue. But maybe not. You see your insurance company isn't going to pay your outstanding loan amount ...no ...they are going to pay what they determine was the value of the vehicle when it met its demise. If it's more than what you owe on the loan? Cool beans. If not ...guess who gets left holding the bag for the remaining balance? You ...with nary a thing to show for it.

So please folks ...lets think about this quick trade up stuff. YOU will be the one getting screwed while the dealer gets not only another new car sold but also reaps the finance charges on the new big(ger) loan you just signed on to.

The smartest thing to do? Pay off that depreciating liability called an automobile as fast as you can ...make additional principle payments and keep the loan value less than the car value or at least close. In the future? Buy used ...2-3 year old vehicles have taken the big depreciation hit courtesy the original owner and you can get new car rates on these vehicles as well.
Lots of people get hooked up on monthly payments and as long as they can afford the monthly payments (although they stretch the terms out from the traditional 48 months to 60 and 72 months in order to handle the payments ) They roll in their existing loan into the new car and just deal with the monthly... until they see another new model and rinse and repeat. That's how Americans are in debt...
 

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2018 SJ Forester 2.5i Ltd CVT
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I dont have one but why you think so ?
Off lease car glut or they loaning to anyone with a pulse again ?
Recent front-page WSJ article: Mounting Car Debt Traps More Drivers
Some notable quotes are:
"Consumers, salespeople and lenders are treating cars a lot like houses during the last financial crisis: by piling on debt to such a degree that it often exceeds the car’s value. This phenomenon—referred to as negative equity, or being underwater—can leave car owners trapped."
"Some 33% of people who traded in cars to buy new ones in the first nine months of 2019 had negative equity..."
"Easy lending standards are perpetuating the cycle, with lenders routinely making car loans with low or no down payments that can last seven years or longer."
"Many of the loans are bundled into bonds and snapped up by Wall Street investors."

Sure sounds familiar.
 

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2017 2.0 FXT-Touring CVT
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2,463 Posts
Recent front-page WSJ article: Mounting Car Debt Traps More Drivers
Some notable quotes are:
"Consumers, salespeople and lenders are treating cars a lot like houses during the last financial crisis: by piling on debt to such a degree that it often exceeds the car’s value. This phenomenon—referred to as negative equity, or being underwater—can leave car owners trapped."
"Some 33% of people who traded in cars to buy new ones in the first nine months of 2019 had negative equity..."
"Easy lending standards are perpetuating the cycle, with lenders routinely making car loans with low or no down payments that can last seven years or longer."
"Many of the loans are bundled into bonds and snapped up by Wall Street investors."

Sure sounds familiar.
Yup. People also don't know how to negotiate and stand their ground. So I often see/hear of people getting uphold when they don't need stuff.
 

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2019 Forester Touring CVT
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213 Posts
When helping my son purchase an Outback, I noticed the going rate for similar used outbacks was about $1000 more in Maine than Ohio. This was maybe 8 years ago. I see you're in Florida, so that may have something to do with the depreciation you're seeing.
Florida I will admit seeing the Subaru models are picking in popularity down here. I have heard Subarus have a cult following up North and on the West Coast. Florida is very flat and the safety features are the big points with me....I only experience more of the wonderful forester features when traveling out of the state!
 

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2019 Forester Touring CVT
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213 Posts
Since people obviously forget children and leave them unattended and locked inside cars nowadays (on rare occasions, considering the frequency it gets reported), it’s therefore not a useless feature.

However, and I know this is anecdotal evidence at best, I’m in my mid 60’s now, and I can’t recall a single instance of things like this being reported until the last 15-20 years. Maybe it happened a lot back then as well, but just didn’t get reported.

Then again, drivers have far too many distractions competing for their attention nowadays. Back then, all we had to distract us was a basic radio (later equipped with a tape player), heater and A/C controls, and a clutch/gear shifter (which helped keep the driver’s mind on driving instead of texting/calling/Internet surfing).

Maybe it’s just another sign of the times.
Dylan: “The times they are a changin!”

IMO, Taking phone calls and Texting are not to bad in the Forester... granted when used responsibly! Wavs is fantastic! I am in my advancing 60s and not the least bit Technophobic!
 

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Is lane centering, a "don't forget your kid in the back" warning, and an LED license plate light worth it? Personally, I am happy with my 2019 touring and its features. I think lane centering would make me nuts. I would never forget a kid in the back seat and whoopee an led bulb on the plate. Also, for a 2019 Touring, I think you got a great deal for 32,000.
i got a 2019 forester as a loaner for 2 days because of the airbag recall on my 09. the first time i changed lanes without a turn signal and it tried to jerk me back into the lane, i sat there turning everything “helpful” off. i was so happy to be back in my 09 when they finished my car, the 19 drove me nuts in general.
 
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