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The front rotors need to be resurfaced so I figured I'd just replace them. I have about 93k miles. Pads- Thinking of doing Wagner OEX ceramic or Bosch BC1539 ceramics. I'm not sure about rotors. Any suggestions?
The trailer I will occasionally tow will be about 1,000lbs loaded. Going to install tranny cooler and thermostat as well.

Are these any Good?: 2014 Subaru Forester H4 2.5L Front Ceramic Brake Pad & Rotor Kit
 

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2015 XT Touring CVT
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692 Posts
I've had good luck with powerstop upgrade parts on my XT. I bought the normal replacement ones for the wife's outback with no issues. https://www.amazon.com/Autospecialty-KOE6082-1-Click-Replacement-Brake/dp/B00CMOVIA8 there is an amazon link for the set for the NA fronts.. They make coated rotors too if you live in rust prone area and was the extra protection PN CRK6082. FYI OEM is Akebono if you just want to head to your local parts stop and save over dealer prices.
 

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2011 Subaru Forester
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2,343 Posts
I did not know that 1A Auto had a house brand for brake parts. They have great how-to videos. That package looks like a very good deal in my opinion. I bought and installed Raybestos EHT pads and rotors for the front and rear of my 2011. Very satisfied with them. Nice brake feel.
 

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2010 Forester XT Automatic
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565 Posts
I've run Hawk HPS and now HPS 5.0 pads on both my 04 FXTi and now my 10 FXT. I live in CO, with weekly mtn driving from 5k up to 10k and back. The cold braking feels like oem. The hot braking bite is hard and fast, feeling very much like a track pad. Dust is minimal. I run them on Hawk Talon vented/drilled rotors. There's not much special about them over oem or blanks, but the price difference is negligible and I've found they don't warp as much through fast hot/cold cycles.
I've run par EBC pads as well but the dust was always pretty bad and my oem blanks have always had warp issues.

For mtn and trailer driving I tend to use the drivetrain for primary speed control, then brakes for secondary. Heat buildup over long descents is a concern for any car, especially when you have excess weight. Engine braking will keep speed largely in check with heavy, short braking periods will allow speed control without excessive heat buildup.
 

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2011 Forester AT
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53 Posts
Powerstop drilled and slotted.
Rockauto is a good place to buy.
Changed calipers, pads and rotors and flushed lines, night and day between the factory and these.
This pulling a 1000 pound trailer and installation transcooler why?
You shouldn't have any issues up to 1500lbs.
Unless you drive at highway speeds into a headwind at 80 mph.
I use one of my foresters for business, pulling a utility trailer that has a dry weight of 600lbs and equipment of 600 to 900 lbs.
I don't pull like a animal, you can feel the weight when pulling. And yes at highway speeds, but I won't be pulled over for speeding.
You can put all the transcoolers on that will fit, but your torque converter will only handle a certain amount of weight before it slips and burns up the bands. That is why you have your weight limit, your torque converter is your limiting factor.
Plus weight of vehicle, axle ratio and engine size.
Its a Subaru, not a 1 ton truck.
 

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2019 Forester Limited
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2,004 Posts
You can put all the transcoolers on that will fit, but your torque converter will only handle a certain amount of weight before it slips and burns up the bands. That is why you have your weight limit, your torque converter is your limiting factor.
I’m not certain this is true, in regard to the torque converter being the sole reason for the weight limit. Foresters down under have a higher tow limit with the same drivetrain. The reason given has always been differences in regulations.
 
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