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2004 Forester XT
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
Some idiot opened his door on my FXT and traded some paint with me. It's not ding but I got some red paint on my door. I do I remove this?
 

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2017 Foz 2.5i CVT
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Hi,
Some idiot opened his door on my FXT and traded some paint with me. It's not ding but I got some red paint on my door. I do I remove this?
A little bit of polishing compound should do it.... There are different grades of rubbing compound (coarsest) to polishing compound (finer) to swirl remover (really fine) available. I'd try the polishing compound for someone else's paint. If you have surface scratches, you can get into the slightly heavier stuff. Even a good cleaner/wax (which has polishing compound type stuff in it) can often get traded paint off...

If you don't have any of this stuff handy, get a slightly wet cloth and put a tiny bit of toothpaste on it and use that...(I used to rub out the paint on my model cars with toothpaste when I was a kid--circa 1962--after reading the tip in a model car magazine.)

If your paint is a darker color, you may end up with some slight swirling from some of the harsher compounds. Rub in circles, then wait for the stuff to dry and wipe it off with a clean dry cloth.

George
 

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2004 Forester XT
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Discussion Starter #4
YoGeorgeA :
Thanks for the great advice.:icon_biggrin:

vicali :
I saw you’re post but wasn’t sure it applied to me since you didn't seems to have paint on yours. Anyway I will be sure to use Scratch-X to remove other paint scratch. So thanks. :icon_biggrin:
 

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....Scratch-X is a decent polish that help remove some blemishes as well as paint transfer. For more "cut", I would recommend Meguiars Ultimate Compound and Meguiars Swirl-X to finish off. UC is more aggressive than Scratch-X and Swirl-X is less so. Swirl-X will remove any fine scratches left by UC. All of these products work well by hand.

btw, with polishes, you generally should not let them dry on the surface. Each product can be a little different so follow the directions.
 

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2004 Forester XT
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Discussion Starter #6
....Scratch-X is a decent polish that help remove some blemishes as well as paint transfer. For more "cut", I would recommend Meguiars Ultimate Compound and Meguiars Swirl-X to finish off. UC is more aggressive than Scratch-X and Swirl-X is less so. Swirl-X will remove any fine scratches left by UC. All of these products work well by hand.

btw, with polishes, you generally should not let them dry on the surface. Each product can be a little different so follow the directions.
Can I use Scratch-X to remove swirl from my car? I'm kind of new to all this and I don't want to mess my paint up.

My plan was this:
  • Wash the car
  • Use Scratch-X 2.0 on obvious scratch by hand.
  • Then do the whole car with Scratch-X 2.0 and a cheap orbit buffer from simoniz to remove all imperfection and swirl.
  • After that use Deep crystal to polish the car with the buffer
  • And finally Wax the car with NXT tech wax 2.0 and the buffer
Does this look like a good plan?
 

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Can I use Scratch-X to remove swirl from my car? I'm kind of new to all this and I don't want to mess my paint up.

My plan was this:
  • Wash the car
  • Use Scratch-X 2.0 on obvious scratch by hand.
  • Then do the whole car with Scratch-X 2.0 and a cheap orbit buffer from simoniz to remove all imperfection and swirl.
  • After that use Deep crystal to polish the car with the buffer
  • And finally Wax the car with NXT tech wax 2.0 and the buffer
Does this look like a good plan?
....polishing by hand is a lot of work but you can still get some decent results depending on a variety of variables (type of paint, product, level of defects to be corrected, etc.). The nice thing about Meguiars consumer line of products is that they generally work well by hand and are basically "bubba proof". Here are a few relevant articles I think you may find useful:

The SMAT PACK - Everything you ever wanted to know about Meguiar's SMAT products... by Mike Phillips
The Aggressiveness Order of SMAT Products - This might surprise you! by Mike Phillips
Scratch Removed using Ultimate Compound by Mike Phillips
The Definitive ScratchX Thread Collection by Mike Phillips

There are many more in the Detailing Library sticky at the top of this forum if you are interested (which I will update next week). Below is a flow chart that give you an idea of the typical order of steps:



As for my personal opinion, I would read through the sticky (as well as the above articles) to get an idea of what process(es) and products will work well for you. What products and techniques you choose will depend partly on whether they are needed, your expectations of the results and the amount of time/money you want to spend. Sorry to be so vague but there is no "one size fits all" regimine that I can outline for you. ....and this is too general of a question to answer properly (without a lengthy response) in my honest opinion.
 

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2009 Forester
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My plan was this:
  • Wash the car
  • Use Scratch-X 2.0 on obvious scratch by hand.
  • Then do the whole car with Scratch-X 2.0 and a cheap orbit buffer from simoniz to remove all imperfection and swirl.
  • After that use Deep crystal to polish the car with the buffer
  • And finally Wax the car with NXT tech wax 2.0 and the buffer
Does this look like a good plan?
Cheap orbit buffer won't work. it is for wax only, not for paint correction.

get a DA (dual action) polisher
 

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2004 Forester XT
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Discussion Starter #9
....polishing by hand is a lot of work but you can still get some decent results depending on a variety of variables (type of paint, product, level of defects to be corrected, etc.). The nice thing about Meguiars consumer line of products is that they generally work well by hand and are basically "bubba proof". Here are a few relevant articles I think you may find useful:

The SMAT PACK - Everything you ever wanted to know about Meguiar's SMAT products... by Mike Phillips
The Aggressiveness Order of SMAT Products - This might surprise you! by Mike Phillips
Scratch Removed using Ultimate Compound by Mike Phillips
The Definitive ScratchX Thread Collection by Mike Phillips

There are many more in the Detailing Library sticky at the top of this forum if you are interested (which I will update next week). Below is a flow chart that give you an idea of the typical order of steps:



As for my personal opinion, I would read through the sticky (as well as the above articles) to get an idea of what process(es) and products will work well for you. What products and techniques you choose will depend partly on whether they are needed, your expectations of the results and the amount of time/money you want to spend. Sorry to be so vague but there is no "one size fits all" regimine that I can outline for you. ....and this is too general of a question to answer properly (without a lengthy response) in my honest opinion.
Thank you for your very informative post and for your detailing library. I did read a lot of information on the library. There is so much information that it is intimidating and a little confusing putting it all together for a newbie at detailing. It's one hell of a sticky. Really good job. :rock:

Cheap orbit buffer won't work. it is for wax only, not for paint correction.

get a DA (dual action) polisher
Thanks for the info. I will go buy the 7424XP then to do a proper job.
 

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2007 FSTI and X 6 MT
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A little bit of polishing compound should do it.... There are different grades of rubbing compound (coarsest) to polishing compound (finer) to swirl remover (really fine) available. I'd try the polishing compound for someone else's paint. If you have surface scratches, you can get into the slightly heavier stuff. Even a good cleaner/wax (which has polishing compound type stuff in it) can often get traded paint off...

If you don't have any of this stuff handy, get a slightly wet cloth and put a tiny bit of toothpaste on it and use that...(I used to rub out the paint on my model cars with toothpaste when I was a kid--circa 1962--after reading the tip in a model car magazine.)

If your paint is a darker color, you may end up with some slight swirling from some of the harsher compounds. Rub in circles, then wait for the stuff to dry and wipe it off with a clean dry cloth.

George
I agree with this. I have done this a few times myself.
 

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Thank you for your very informative post and for your detailing library. I did read a lot of information on the library. There is so much information that it is intimidating and a little confusing putting it all together for a newbie at detailing. It's one hell of a sticky. Really good job. :rock:
....thanks Murdoc. I just updated the sticky btw.

I can understand being a little overwhelmed by all the information. ….and to make it more confusing, even the “experts” will disagree on a lot of topics. The key is to find products and a regimen that works for you. Personally, I’m always changing up my routine, trying new things, products, etc. I have my favorites (processes, tools, products) but I know there is always room for adjustments/improvements. My priorities have also changed in recent years. While I still enjoy detailing my cars, I don’t strive for the level of perfection I once did. ….efficiency is more important to me these days as long as I can still get near the same result.

If this is your first time doing a full detail, I would suggest considering the following basic routine (this doesn’t come close to covering all aspects but should give you a general idea):

Wash
For the occasional full detail, some use Dawn (the basic blue liquid dishwashing detergent) to help strip away any old wax/sealant from the finish. Others use a dilution of an APC (all purpose cleaner) or a dedicated decontamination system like Valugard ABC, Finish Kare FK1119 /883, etc. This is not particularly necessary (especially if you will be claying and/or polishing with a DA/rotary) but some like to have a product-free finish before moving to the next phase. ….and some sealants require a sealant/wax free surface to properly bond to.

Clay
If this is your first time, chances are that you will have some level of contaminates “stuck” to your finish. After washing run your hand gently across the panels. Notice any grittiness that didn’t come off during your wash? This is what clay was intended to help remove. The key to using clay while eliminating the chance of marring (or keeping it to a minimum) is in the lubrication and technique. You want to use plenty of lube so that the clay glides freely and just enough pressure to keep it pressed against the surface of the finish. Also take care along body creases/lines as these areas are more susceptible to marring. Chances are will you will get at least some blemishes from clay barring but the idea is to limit them as much as possible if you can. Also, some choose to wash after this process while others prefer to clean up each section/panel as you go. ….I prefer the latter. I will clay each section and then re-wet with quick detailer & wipe down (moving on to the next one).

Polish
Find an area where you can do a test section. I usually choose a region of the car that is a little worse than the rest. This is where you will test your products/pads to determine what combination will work best on the rest of the car. Keep in mind that you want to use the least aggressive method/tools/products needed to get the job done. Don’t start off with a heavy compound when a light polish will do the trick. Also, don’t make the mistake of going after every random isolated deep scratch (RIDS) at the risk of compromising the health of your paint. Once you have tested your polishes, you are now ready to tackle the rest of the car. ….you may hear people refer to an “IPA wipedown” after polishing. This is usually a simple solution of 50% IPA (isopropyl/rubbing alcohol) and 50% water. The idea is to go over the freshly polished panels misting the IPA solution (from a spray bottle) and wiping down with a good quality, soft towel. The alcohol will help remove any polish residue and/or oils from the finish. This gives you a true view of how the surface actually looks (with no fillers, etc. masking blemishes) and leaves you with a clean surface that is ready for a sealant/wax of your choice. IPA is not the most effective at this task but it is readily available and relatively inexpensive.

Protect
There are numerous waxes and sealants to choose from (LSP’s – last step products). While there are many good ones available, there are just as many that are mediocre or simply worthless. IMO the key to choosing the right LSP (as with most detailing products) is by defining what characteristics are most important to you. ….ease of use, aesthitics (i.e. depth, warmth, shine….), durability, resilience to contaminants, etc.


I hope that helps. Maybe you can just focus on articles pertaining to basic topics for now before delving into all of the particulars. Once you are comfortable with what you have digested, move to the next topic of interest.
 

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If his paint is on your car, use the lightest stuff possible. Your paint will probably have no damage. I found that Maguires cleaner wax has removed most scuffs from my 2 fozzy's. I am very pleased with how well Suby paint cleans up compared to my Kia. Kia's paint is sooo soft.
 
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