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2003 forester XS
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621 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I M embarassed to say this but how the he'll do the front
rotors come off a MY03 !!??

I have been working on cars for years and never had an issue

I see the two threaded holes but no head to put a screwdriver bit
front or back?!

Please help
 

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2005 Impreza RS Wagon Auto
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3,683 Posts
I M embarassed to say this but how the he'll do the front
rotors come off a MY03 !!??

I have been working on cars for years and never had an issue

I see the two threaded holes but no head to put a screwdriver bit
front or back?!

Please help
A hammer, no joke. Corrosion is a bich.
 

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2010 Forester X Premium
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942 Posts
Yup hammer the leaving S'''t out of it, ;) I had same issue with my civic, and I was afraid that I might screw something up so I went to a shop so they can do it for me and they looked at me and gave me exactly the same advice I gave you: "hammer the leaving s..t out of it ;) lol it worked.
 

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Premium Member
2004 Forester 4EAT
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5,458 Posts
I just pulled the drums off my 99 that have been on for god knows how long. Car was, until recently, in new york. Rust is EVERYWHERE. Two 8mm bolts into the holes and they came off with no problem.
 

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I just had to deal with the same issue over the weekend. Make sure you take the caliper off first.

Spray some PB Blaster (or equivalent) into the threaded holes and around the studs. Thread bolts into the two holes, tighten them up as much as you think you can get away with, then hit the "hat" part of the rotor with a 3 lb short sledge hammer while rotating the rotor. You want to set up vibrations in the rotor that will loosen-up the corrosion. Keep tightening up the bolts.

When that doesn't work, start whacking the back of the rotor with the sledge through the gap in the backing plate where the caliper used to be. Again, keep turning the rotor while hitting the back and attempting to tighten the bolts.

You have to be careful about hitting the rotor too hard. You can damage the wheel bearings.

A fall-back option is to use a sawz-all with a metal cutting blade to make some cuts in the rotor, then split the rotor using a cold chisel! I once had to do this to the rotors on my old DSM.

When you get the f****er finally off, brush the corrosion products off the hub mounting face and apply some anti-seize before putting the new rotor on.
 

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2007 FSTI and X 6 MT
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22,330 Posts
Thread two 8mm bolts into the holes, tighten them down and they'll pop the rotors off. :icon_wink:
This is the correct way to do it. The bad part about the hammer is you could affect your alignment beating on the brakes.
 

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2004 Forester XT Premium 4EAT
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30,105 Posts
I've changed your thread title to something a little more descriptive of the problem. It helps.
 

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2010 Forester
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174 Posts
When you get the f****er finally off, brush the corrosion products off the hub mounting face and apply some anti-seize before putting the new rotor on.
+1 on using the anti-seize. Just don't get it on the threads of the wheel studs. You don't want the lugs coming loose while you're rolling down the road.
 

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This is the correct way to do it. The bad part about the hammer is you could affect your alignment beating on the brakes.
+1 on using the anti-seize. Just don't get it on the threads of the wheel studs. You don't want the lugs coming loose while you're rolling down the road.
FWIW, I have been using anti-seize on my wheel studs for years (including a few track day cars) and have never had that problem. I think the anti-seize helps with getting equivalent torque on all the lug nuts and minimizing problems with rotor distortion during hard use. Of course, ymmv. Another "of course" is to always use a torque wrench when installing lug nuts.
 

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The Modfather
2016 BRZ Limited - Manual 6 Speed Manual
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8,095 Posts
This is what I was told about anti-seize on lug nuts:

Anti-seize or lube on a lug nut is a very bad idea !!!

Here's why: Bolts or studs provide clamping force by being purposely stretched. Most torque specs bring a bolt well within its elastic limit. Then when loosened they will return to their original length and can be safely reused (Some bolts, including many head bolts, are purposely stretched past their elastic limit, and can not be reused). The torque wrench is the most convenient-but not the most accurate-method of properly stretching automotive bolts. Engineers spend hours correlating the proper bolt stretch to the required turning effort. About 90% of a torque specification is used to overcome friction; only 10% of the specified twisting effort provides clamping force.

It is no surprise then that most lubricant tables recommend a 40-45% reduction of applied torque when using anti-seize on a bolt. So, a lug nut coated with anti-seize should be tightened to a maximum of 49 ft-lbs. Tightening this lug nut to 85 ft-lbs. means it is now over-torqued by 73%! Considering that most torque specs stretch a bolt to within 70% of its elastic limit, over-truing by 73% will easily send the bolt or stud well beyond its elastic limit-and could be dangerously close to its failure point.
Having posted that I have also used it on lug nuts for years with no issues. About 10 years ago I stopped after I read the above. I've never had an issue getting my lug nuts off though after being properly torqued down even w/o the anti- seize.
 

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2003 forester XS
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621 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for all the tips my side job is restoring 30 year old VW and Porsche and never have
I had this much trouble getting freakin rotor off !! I look around and what do I see a cv boot that is slightly split and has been shooting grease everywhere , grrr now I gotta replace the half shaft on this car don't I ? -- grrr

Pass side got done& I get to the driver side - caliper come s off easy , the top caliper mounting bracket comes off pretty easy .... I try to teat out the bottom bracket Bily to see if it'll break free .... Oh it does first tug by freaking snapping off !!! ***!!!!

Now I gotta see if I can get a drill in there or something to get the f- in bolt out - why does **** like this happen when I just need to real quick and eAsy swap some pads and rotors ?!

Any body else snap this bolt and have an idea what fits well back there ?
 

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Premium Member
'09 STI
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4,212 Posts
Yup hammer the leaving S'''t out of it, ;)
Real Lyte said:
hammer, no joke. Corrosion is a bich.

Remind me to never let you guys near my car. I prefer the two bolt method and a light tap with a hammer. You're not driving a bullprick.

I look around and what do I see a cv boot that is slightly split and has been shooting grease everywhere , grrr now I gotta replace the half shaft on this car don't I ? -- grrr
Depends on how old your car is and how long it's been without grease. If the joints not thrashed you can just replace the boots.
 

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2005 Impreza RS Wagon Auto
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3,683 Posts
Remind me to never let you guys near my car. I prefer the two bolt method and a light tap with a hammer. You're not driving a bullprick.


Depends on how old your car is and how long it's been without grease. If the joints not thrashed you can just replace the boots.
Hahahaha, well I presumed he had tried the 8mm bolt method, I probably shouldn't jump to conclusions. I just remember last time I had to take the caliper and rotor off, corrosion is a ***** and a hammer fixed it. In states where they use salt it destroys our cars...
 

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04 Forester X, MT
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Rather than a straight hammer, I have a brass rod about a foot long that I use with about a 3lb hammer if necessary. I got this to get drums off a Suburban. Haven't had to use it on the Subie, but then I don't live in salt country either.

The lower caliper yoke (pad holders?) bolt will often be in bad shape or even break. I got a couple of new ones to install in the lower holes when I did brakes and mine only had maybe 80kmi and was not primarily used in severe salt areas. 80s Toyotas I owned had a silver cad-plated bolt for these that never had problems with corrosion. subaru uses a standard plating for these that just doesn't last. (subaru does use the better plating on the caliper bolts.)
 

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04 Forester X, MT
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This is what I was told about anti-seize on lug nuts:



Having posted that I have also used it on lug nuts for years with no issues. About 10 years ago I stopped after I read the above. I've never had an issue getting my lug nuts off though after being properly torqued down even w/o the anti- seize.
I've heard it both ways. I think what primarily snaps lugs is cross-threading (not starting nuts by hand) and overzealous impact wrenches, regardless of thread condition. I prefer to keep a very light amount of anti-seize on mine and haven't had any issues. They do make a solid "stick" version that has less oil in it than the kind that comes in the tube.

I did get a set of tires from walmart once in a bind and they put too much antiseize on every time i went to get them rotated. yuck. I had to clean extra off a few times but they never snapped or stripped any lugs.
 
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