Subaru Forester Owners Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
1999 Forester
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I recently replaced the drums, pads, and associated hardware on my 99 Forester I did not replace the wheel cylinder assembly, nor did I bleed the system when done. Now the pedal goes about 3/4 of the way to the floor before good braking is achieved. If I pump the brakes, the pressure is better, and braking is achieved at 1/4 level. There is plenty of fluid.

Does anyone have any suggestions to fix the problem?

Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
Bleed the system thoroughly. I usually start w/ RR, LR, LF, RF but I don't think the sequence is critical.

Have partner pump the brake pedal and hold while you crack the bleeder. Hold pedal down as it collapses, close bleeder and repeat until clear fluid comes out of bleeder.

Resupply brake fluid reservoir as it get's lower.

A short length of flexible surgical tube is handy to push over the bleeder and allow fluid to be directed to a catch bottle.

good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Did you adjust the rear shoes properly? Will take a long time for the auto adjusters to take up the slack. May be cause of low pedal. No reason to bleed brakes after replacement unless wetted parts such as hoses,calipers,etc are replaced.
 

·
Registered
1999 Forester
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Did you adjust the rear shoes properly? Will take a long time for the auto adjusters to take up the slack. May be cause of low pedal. No reason to bleed brakes after replacement unless wetted parts such as hoses,calipers,etc are replaced.
That's what I thought, too. But it's been about 2 weeks, and it's still not better. I'm going to try the bleeding later today, then go from there.
 

·
Registered
1999 Forester
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Bleed the system thoroughly. I usually start w/ RR, LR, LF, RF but I don't think the sequence is critical.

Have partner pump the brake pedal and hold while you crack the bleeder. Hold pedal down as it collapses, close bleeder and repeat until clear fluid comes out of bleeder.

Resupply brake fluid reservoir as it get's lower.

A short length of flexible surgical tube is handy to push over the bleeder and allow fluid to be directed to a catch bottle.

good luck
Thanks...I'm going to give it a shot today. I'll let you know how it goes. I appreciate the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
Williebat's right about not bleeding if system is not opened. Were brakes tight before the work? Bleeding won't help if the problem is too loose rear shoes.

I've had luck w/ backing and applying brakes to get best performance from auto-adjusters. Not sure why that seems to work better, since it appears that adjusters should work fine as long as stroke is long enough to engage the adjuster star wheel.

You can manually adjust also.

good luck
 

·
Registered
99 Forester
Joined
·
89 Posts
Sorry this reply is a bit late.

However the information may help someone else.

The self adjuster mechanism is prone to partial seizing. When reassembling after replacing the shoes make sure you first clean the adjuster mechanism and then apply Copper based brake grease to the adjuster and a smear to the pads on the backplate where the shoes rest and slide.

Otherwise sometimes the adjuster will not take up the slack!

Jon
 

·
Registered
2008 STI 6 Speed
Joined
·
48 Posts
Spongy brakes comes from the fluid being old and contaminated. Bleed the brakes and you wont have any problems

- Joe
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top