Subaru Forester Owners Forum banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently noticed a screw in my 2017 Subaru Forester original tire about 1/2 way between the sidewall and the outside groove (still where the rubber meets the road). I had no dash lights, just visual observation. Stopped by the dealership on the way home and was told they considered the "sidewall" to be side to the first groove. My only choices at the dealership were 4 new tires (so they would all match in size) or a shaved tire which would take a week and was more expensive than a new tire. Car at 24000 mi. Is this a new definition of a sidewall? Does Subaru have a Road Hazard warranty available for their tires? This could get to be pricey quickly.
 

·
Registered
2017 Forester
Joined
·
312 Posts
Assuming you don't need new tires anyway and don't want to have 1 new tire shaved, determine the current tread depth and check on eBay for a tire that matches.

I did this on my 2017 and was able to find the right tire size, brand and depth for around $60 including delivery.
 

·
Registered
2017 Outback
Joined
·
122 Posts
I would have an independent tire dealer look at the tire for another opinion.... but if the puncture is in the tread area I would have it repaired and see how it does. Car dealerships oversell the need for replacement parts and I would be more inclined to take the advice of a tire dealer. If you don't have a favorite then ask a friend for a recommendation of a dependable tire dealer.

All wheel drive vehicles must have 4 tires with the same tread depth to protect the drive train. It's just a fact. Only you can decide whether to buy one shaved tire or four new tires.
 

·
Premium Member
2019 Crosstrek 2018 Forester XT
Joined
·
14,802 Posts
Oh the pain..should have never bought a "TRUE" awd.
But good suggestions above.
 

·
Registered
2014 2.5i Limited CVT
Joined
·
2,841 Posts
So True!

Car dealerships oversell the need for replacement parts ....
how true!

While I love my local Subie dealer, I often find their recommendations for non-warranty service to be ... well, less than stellar.

For example, after a recent repair (control arms and bushings, 4-wheel align), I was told -

I needed new tires, needed new front pads AND rotors, new rear pads AND rotors.

My 2014 Forester 2.5i Limited has under 32,000 miles.

I replaced the stock Geolanders with a set of Nexen N5000 Plus tires with a 65000 warranty at under 20K miles miles.... And Subaru is saying that my tires are getting close to replacement mileage!

Front brake pads have 3 MM of material, rears are at 2 MM. They're not totally worn - still have a few miles of usable life left... But they suggested NEW ROTORS as well, even though there is no scoring or marking on the rotors...! Total of almost $1100 bucks for both axles...!

Yikes!

As for the original post tires - yes, sidewall (even at the shoulder of the tread) - go get a different set of tires... Those stock Geolanders will probably need to be replaced in the next year anyway.

GingerBear
2014 Forester 2.5i Limited
Fozzie Balou
 

·
Registered
Sahuarita, AZ 2018 Forester Limited
Joined
·
2,817 Posts
How much tread depth do you have on your old tires? Depending upon which Subaru dealer you talk to your tread depth can vary up to 2/32 or 3/32.
 

·
Registered
2014 2.5i Limited CVT
Joined
·
2,841 Posts
Me? At the last check, they were still at 5/32 tread... again, just about 12K miles in 2 years.

How much tread depth do you have on your old tires? Depending upon which Subaru dealer you talk to your tread depth can vary up to 2/32 or 3/32.
It's a case of dealer greed. It happens. Worst part was when one of the service writers said that "nexen are off-brand" tires. Hmm... They've only been making tires for about 70 years. And not to mention the patent they have on some technology....

No, again, it's just a service department wanting to pad the "customer pay" numbers.... :surprise:
 

·
Premium Member
2014 Touring with Eyesigh CVT
Joined
·
616 Posts
Not really, it comes down to safety and liability. No reputable tire service department would repair that tire with damage in that area because of the stress flex it receives from turning. Now, being informed about your options is a good thing and so far the forum member response has been right on but only you can decide what is the most prudent course.
I have been it this same situation and my decision was to think safety first, replaced all four tires with Michelin premier and just call it a day.

Laughing at oneself and with others is good for the Soul
 

·
Registered
2017 Forester XT CVT
Joined
·
284 Posts
Ppl will shout at me but I drove on a patched (fix a flat) side wall puncture for 20,000 miles on my fxt last year. Stock OE tire... before that I had a plug in one of my old land rover LR3’s tires for at least the same mileage...

Put plugs in trailer tires too, and trailered on one indefinitely for like a year (it too had a screw in the side wall). So yeah every pro will tell you patches, plugs and fix-a-flat it a temporary fix... but it’s only b/c risk midigation... honestly same reason dealers over sell the needs for new parts...

In my experience a patched tire can be just as good as a “new” one but you would be well served to keep that patch in the back of your mind and drive accordingly. Ie not like a race car on a track day.

That’s my 2c for whatever it’s worth. Not bring on the judgement whoop woop.
 

·
Premium Member
2019 Crosstrek 2018 Forester XT
Joined
·
14,802 Posts
Again..it about liability. You could go to a tire place..have them dismount the tire. Put a good PATCH on the INSIDE and have them remount the tire.

In the interest of liability.."Please do not do this"
 

·
Registered
2015 Forester Premium
Joined
·
569 Posts
Assuming you don't need new tires anyway and don't want to have 1 new tire shaved, determine the current tread depth and check on eBay for a tire that matches.

I did this on my 2017 and was able to find the right tire size, brand and depth for around $60 including delivery.
Or a repair shop. Lots of places have decent used tires with lots of life left.

Good you changed them in my opinion. When I swapped tires at 30K I brought home the OEM tires and stacked them in a corner. Sure they take up space. But I was thinking about this scenario.

I have read Discount Tire shops have a shaver, but can only shave a new, undriven on tire. Future reference. :)
 

·
Registered
2016 and 2020 Foresters
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
"nexen are off-brand" tires. Hmm... They've only been making tires for about 70 years.
70 years in business is relatively meaningless. Westinghouse and Bell and Howell still exist as brands and they both make trash, at least when it comes to consumer electronics.

Nexen are comparable to Hankook and Kumho, other Koran tire makes. Not that great overall. I'd consider them off-ish brand. A notch above Chinese tires, but still inferior to the major brands.

But they suggested NEW ROTORS as well, even though there is no scoring or marking on the rotors
That's becoming the norm. I replace rotors as well when I do brakes. Bedding of brake pads deposits pad material on the rotors. Braking performance depends on bedding in properly. New pads on used rotors can cause uneven pad deposits ('warped' rotors). New rotors can be cheaper than the labor cost of turning old rotors these days.
 

·
Registered
2015 Forester CVT
Joined
·
121 Posts
... wonder if it would make financial sense to have 6 mounted tires and rotate them into and out of service (4 in use, 2 at home for backup). When rotating tires, you would rotate 2 into backup and bring the 2 backups into service. Anyone care to do an analysis?
 

·
Registered
2018 Forester XT
Joined
·
1,607 Posts
I would have an independent tire dealer look at the tire for another opinion.... but if the puncture is in the tread area I would have it repaired and see how it does. Car dealerships oversell the need for replacement parts and I would be more inclined to take the advice of a tire dealer. If you don't have a favorite then ask a friend for a recommendation of a dependable tire dealer.

All wheel drive vehicles must have 4 tires with the same tread depth to protect the drive train. It's just a fact. Only you can decide whether to buy one shaved tire or four new tires.

There is a range and variance among manufacturers. Mercedes is the strictest (2mm) I believe
 

·
Registered
2009 Forester XT
Joined
·
121 Posts
I would have an independent tire dealer look at the tire for another opinion.... but if the puncture is in the tread area I would have it repaired and see how it does. Car dealerships oversell the need for replacement parts and I would be more inclined to take the advice of a tire dealer. If you don't have a favorite then ask a friend for a recommendation of a dependable tire dealer.

All wheel drive vehicles must have 4 tires with the same tread depth to protect the drive train. It's just a fact. Only you can decide whether to buy one shaved tire or four new tires.
My wife and family drive my Forester on California highways. I will never compromise on tire safety. If that means buy four new skins, so be it, but I have peace of mind. My question is why go to the dealer for the tire? Why not the manufacture's authorized tire store?

By the way, I had a flat on one tire and didn't need to buy four new ones. I just bought two for the same axle.

Finally, lawsuits will often dictate policies. I don't blame the dealer for not wanting to risk a lawsuit or a life.
 

·
Registered
2003 Forester X Automatic
Joined
·
81 Posts
... wonder if it would make financial sense to have 6 mounted tires and rotate them into and out of service (4 in use, 2 at home for backup). When rotating tires, you would rotate 2 into backup and bring the 2 backups into service. Anyone care to do an analysis?
We did that -- bought extra wheels, have two spares and do a 6-wheel rotation (make sure you chalk-mark L and R tires and make clear to whoever does the rotation what you're doing)

Did that because we drive some tire-eating roads and want the extra spare in case we get a flat, so we don't need to turn around -- but also so we don't hit the "four new tires" problem when we kill a tire.

Analysis? I dunno, it just feels like the right thing to do.
 

·
Registered
2017 Touring CVT
Joined
·
131 Posts
I posted the saga below last Summer. It may have some application to this thread.


The issue of mismatched tires on AWD Subs goes back decades. The stated tolerance used to be a mere 2/32" in circumference and the resulting failures from mismatching involved the electronic transfer case, not the transmission, as the orphan tire triggered constant signals to the case that there was wheel slippage. The cost of a replacement transfer case used to be in the range of $1800-2,000 US.

Like the originator of this thread I had an experience with a failed tire on my 05 OB, where the 3 remaining tires still had 75-80% tread remaining. I balked at the thought of replacing all tires but I still wanted the AWD function intact, so I first explored the possibility of new tire shaving (TireRack did this), but the thought of wasting new tread bothered me. I finally went to a tire shop in rural Lancaster County, PA, where a conscientious employee measured the circumference on my 3 tires and, after measuring several tires in their inventory, found a match on a new Chinese tire. I opted for this solution and all the tires lasted for 3 more years and about 45,000 miles before being reshod. The car still runs fine for my son, who has made several extended road trips all over the US.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top