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Supporting Vendor
Tire & Wheel Specialists
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Discussion Starter #1
Upgrading your tires can be one of the best improvements you can do to your vehicle. Without traction your performance upgrades will be lost. Sounds easy enough but if you haven't ever upgraded your tires where do you start? :huh:

We are working on improving our website's wheel and tire reference center. We call it our "Info Center". It is a section of our website that contains useful information and recommendations that we have found in our 50 years of doing business. To locate our Wheel and Tire "Info center" just go to our website and click on the tab that says "Info Center". (or click the quick reference link below)

We are constantly improving this section and adding more information to it and we have recently started adding some Video clips. Our latest video explains tire sizes and how to read them.

Video Link: Reading the Sidewall of a tire

Quick Reference and link to more videos: Info Center


:banana::banana::banana:*** If you have found this helpful please post a comment, If you would like to see more videos tell us what video we should do next. **

-Discount Tire
 

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Premium Member
2015 Highlander AWD XLE 6AT
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4,255 Posts
The info is generally useful. However, these parts need to be fixed:

Plies - "E"
The last letter in a standard tire size indicates the number of layers used in the construction of the tire. If there is no letter, the tire has the standard 4 plies. A "C" indicates 6 plies, a "D" indicates 8 plies, and an "E" indicates 10 plies. The higher the number of plies in a tire, the stronger the tire is and the more air pressure the tire can safely hold.
Today, the "plies" letter typically refers to "ply rating" and a maximum inflation pressure spec, and not to number of plies used in the construction. For example, an "E" rated tire, or "10-ply rated", typically has its maximum load specs based on 80 psi inflation.

Good luck finding a modern "E" rated radial tire constructed with 10 physical plies. The actual construction is described on the tire's sidewall.

For example, I just installed a new set of front tires on my 3/4 ton pickup truck. They are size 265/75R16 Load Range E. The “E” designation means in part that the tires are “10 ply rated”. However, their actual physical construction is "just" seven plies: two sidewall plies, plus five more tread plies (two polyester, two steel, and one polyamide). So, while these tires are “10 ply rated”, their construction does not include 10 plies.

There's a bit more info here: Tire Tech Information - Load Range/Ply Rating Identification

Higher ply tires require more air pressure to maintain proper wear.
I don't believe this is universally correct. For example, the LT265R16E tires (3,415 lbs single at 80 psi) on my pickup have the same load capacity if inflated to 65 psi (3,000 lbs single) as an LT265R16D tire inflated to its maximum pressure (65 psi).

For example, see page 97 here.

HTH,
Jim / crewzer
 

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Supporting Vendor
Tire & Wheel Specialists
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Discussion Starter #3
The info is generally useful. However, these parts need to be fixed:



Today, the "plies" letter typically refers to "ply rating" and a maximum inflation pressure spec, and not to number of plies used in the construction. For example, an "E" rated tire, or "10-ply rated", typically has its maximum load specs based on 80 psi inflation.

Good luck finding a modern "E" rated radial tire constructed with 10 physical plies. The actual construction is described on the tire's sidewall.

For example, I just installed a new set of front tires on my 3/4 ton pickup truck. They are size 265/75R16 Load Range E. The “E” designation means in part that the tires are “10 ply rated”. However, their actual physical construction is "just" seven plies: two sidewall plies, plus five more tread plies (two polyester, two steel, and one polyamide). So, while these tires are “10 ply rated”, their construction does not include 10 plies.

There's a bit more info here: Tire Tech Information - Load Range/Ply Rating Identification



I don't believe this is universally correct. For example, the LT265R16E tires (3,415 lbs single at 80 psi) on my pickup have the same load capacity if inflated to 65 psi (3,000 lbs single) as an LT265R16D tire inflated to its maximum pressure (65 psi).

For example, see page 97 here.

HTH,
Jim / crewzer
Thank you for the feedback. Your comments and thoughts will be shared with our technical department. Ply lettering does indeed relate to the ply ratings not always the number of actual plies in the tire. Tires with E ratings typically have 65psi or 80psi max pressures depending on size. On our website we separate these two differences with "E1" 10ply ratings and 80psi max and "E2" 10 ply rating 65psi max.

As for the pressures and even wear. Given a constant load index it is always true. I will leave it up to our technical department to make any changes to the statement that may be necessary.

Thanks again for your comments. We are always looking for improvements. If you have any more feedback for us please send us a PM. I would be happy to forward an additional thoughts.

-Travis
 
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