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Discussion Starter #1
I bought my 2018 2.5i Premium 6M new in Sept. 2017.

In the past few months, when I go out to start the car, it'll momentarily catch then die. On the second attempt, I have the accelerator to the floor and turn the key, turning over a few times before catching. During 99% of the times, the car starts right up -- regardless if temp is 0F or 75F or change in elevations.

This starting difficulty appears to happen more frequently lately (current mileage: 16,650). I have been unable to find any kind of pattern: Sometimes where I work, at 11,000 feet, or at a ski area with a base of 9,500 feet (average of ski areas), and once at home at 8750 feet. Temps are variable.

I have ordered a new engine air filter, as when I checked it at 12,000 miles, it was somewhat dirty. I figured this would at least be a start.

Otherwise, thinking of stopping by the dealership next week. In the meantime, thought I'd ask you all about this.

Any help would be appreciated.
 

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2000 Forester 4eat
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107 Posts
Take your car to the dealer for a charging system test. These cars are known for having weak batteries from the factory. If it is bad, you should be able to get a new one for FREE under the 3/36 warranty.
 

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1999 "L" - 231,000 mi. AT
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702 Posts
Have never touched the gas pedal to start a fuel injected car. Air filters - if they get dirty they filter better (fact); never seen any impact on road driveability or mpg from an 'experienced filter;' even 35,000 miles when I change them out - no break through of dirt.

If it's under warranty your dealer route is the way to go.
FWIW - I always, always have had the dealer do some maintenance (oil/filter?, even if early) when I've taken cars in for warranty issues; over the years, it seems to have worked better for me if they can bill for something...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just thought I'd ask this, too: Only dealerships are able to do work on the car under warranty? In other words, would I instead be able to bring this issue to my former independent Subaru shop for warranty work? I've never owned a new car before, so this is rather new for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So, here is my engine air filter at 16,700 miles. Had one on order, so just replaced it.

Have been turning key to on, let my gauges swing to the right then back left, then starting it. Successfully.

Will try these for a while; if the starting-up problem re-news itself, then I'll take it in
 

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2018 Forester XT Limited CVT
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I have the accelerator to the floor and turn the key
In the old days, when you pressed the throttle pedal, it would pull a cable. The other end of this cable rotated a pulley on the engine, and the pulley opened and closed a valve. The valve restricted how much air entered the engine. The valve "throttled" how much air the engine was allowed to suck in. When you pushed the pedal all the way down, the valve was open all the way and the engine was able to produce maximum power.

Car manufacturers know that people have been hanging on to their car-starting methods from the past, holding the pedal at different positions during starting, or pumping the pedal (I think this just opens and closes the valve and does nothing else), etc. But these days the engine is controlled electronically. When you press the throttle pedal, nothing happens in the engine compartment as a direct result of you pressing the pedal. All that happens is a computer looks at the pedal position, and tells the engine and transmission what to do. And, I think whatever you do to the pedal is completely ignored during starting. The starting is handled by the computers.

I learned about the cars ignoring the throttle pedal during starting many years ago. Before the days of electronic throttle, when there was still a cable, I don't know if there was some sort of mechanical thing that cut out the pedal input. I don't think many engines were electronically controlled back then.
 
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