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1999 Forester S 4EAT
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I wasn't trying to have people do illegal stuff :icon_biggrin:
Nor did I say that you were. However, your assertion that it's OK to run linears or other similar devices on CB if you have a ham licence was patently incorrect. That is all.

I've heard rumors that Virginia DOT officers(truck scales) are starting to check truckers setups for amps and 10m radios...:icon_wink:
That's interesting, because there's nothing I'm aware of that prohibits the possession of those devices though their use may be restricted. If they are actually doing that then they may be opening themselves up to some serious liability.

Then again, this is also the one state in the US that expressly prohibits the use of radar detectors, so who knows what they may be trying to pull.

CRTC? hahahahaha
Unless something's changed recently that I'm unaware of, Industry Canada is equivalent to the FCC for both licensing and enforcement, not the CRTC.
 

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2004 Forester XT 5MT
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On a related note, I'd be interested to hear what anyone has done to mount a dual-band 2m antenna on their Fozzie, and how they've run the cable. Mag mount, hatch clip, or fabricating a bracket to go on my roof rails?
 

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2010 Forester 2.5X Prem A
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On a related note, I'd be interested to hear what anyone has done to mount a dual-band 2m antenna on their Fozzie, and how they've run the cable. Mag mount, hatch clip, or fabricating a bracket to go on my roof rails?
I've been running the Comet heavy duty lip mount on my 2010 with a Jetstream dual band antenna. The antenna cable starts thin and then comes out to the usual thicker coax. I've got mine on the trunk and run the cable down the side of the trunk opening. I think i can do a cleaner job but as of now it works. I'm still tempted by an electric tilt because a few of my favorite stores have low parking garage roofs and i get forgetful.

Running an Icom 2820 and when stoped for long periods pull out the HF, IC-7200. Funny story about the 7200, while trying to get out of the rain, I ran over the radio. The sucker still works, the LDG tuner had to get replaced.

Power is provided by an 72 amp hour ups batt charged by an West Mountain IsoPwr. I eventually need to tie the battery box down. Velcro doesn't hold a battery of this size

I would like to get a CB just cover my rear. I also got some Moto handhelds from friend that I need see they still work. Only significant tasks left is noise reduction and learning how tie down tripod, antennas, and canopy to the roof.

frank b
kb1qzh
 

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2004 Forester XT 5MT
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84 Posts
So is your mount the Comet RS730? I was also pondering getting a mount that goes on the roof rack crossbar, but then I have to get the coax to it.

My '04 has a power point in the cargo area. Is that what you're using to feed your battery?
 

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1999 Forester S 4EAT
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I've been running the Comet heavy duty lip mount on my 2010 with a Jetstream dual band antenna.
Any chance of a link to the exact mount you're using? I think I know which one you're referring to, but would like to be certain.
 

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2004 Forester XT 5MT
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I was just looking at how those Comet lip mounts attach. Since I have an XT with a spoiler, I'd have to mount it down very low for it to clear. So I guess it's on to Comet's rack mount.
 

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1999 Forester S 4EAT
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I hope I dont get in trouble but im going to copy this guys setup! To be completely mobile.
I will most likely us an Icom as well yaesu is pricey

Also got my Ham radio study guild hope to have a license by july.



Pursuing the perfect “portable” ham radio setup @ iBanjo.
Heh, that's funny. I'm running something similar to that: a Yaesu FT-8900 powered from a Werker 18A/h AGM battery transmitting through a Comet UHV-4 antenna. Whole thing is built into an ammo can; it's very portable.
 

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Very nice any pics ?
Sure. I wanted to keep the pictures large to show as much detail as possible, so you'll have to click through to get to them.

Exterior view, lid closed. The elbow is actually a right-angle adapter connected to a normal PL-259 connector; it sticks out just far enough that when the UHV-4 antenna is attached to it the antenna does not contact the ammo can. The four philips bolt heads visible on the long side are fastening down the factory radio bracket inside the can.

Exterior view, lid open. The black stuff inside the lid is an old floormat cut to fit and stuck in place with 3M Super 77 adhesive; this is to prevent the battery shorting against the lid. Inside the can itself, the transceiver is closest to the eye and the battery is behind it. The right-hand side of the compartment contains the radio faceplate and mic.

Birds-eye view inside of the can. If you look closely, you can see the metal bracket that was welded in to keep the battery in place.

Faceplate and mic in operating position. Normally the antenna would be connected and the lid flipped over to about an inch short of being closed; this is to allow ventilation for the radio and sound from the built-in speaker to get out.

This was the first one of its kind that I built, and it's working out pretty well. The battery is beefy enough that it can run the radio for up to 24 hours on a charge depending on usage; one big advantage is that it can be recharged from either an automotive mains battery charger or jumper cables. This is definitely not something you want to try to run off of a lighter/power socket.

The one thing I might have done differently in retrospect would be to have located the transceiver further forward to offset the battery weight a bit (the can has a tendency to tilt towards the battery when you're carrying it), but I really don't know how much it would do to help. Also, I still need to install external jacks for the faceplate, external speaker, and serial port, but my motivation to pull it all apart again is kind of low - it's not so much that it was difficult to put together, but getting the radio mounted to the bracket and screwing the whole thing into place was kinda fiddly as there's just not much room to work in.
 

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2010 Forester 2.5X Prem A
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Can't post links yet. I have the Comet RS840 mount and the West Mountain Radio, IsoPWR battery isolator

I really haven't found a good way to mount the battery box in the trunk.
My dual bander is just velcro-ed underneath the driver seat and extension cables used for the head and mic.

I went with a 2 pin molex power connector at the radio because i prefer locking connectors over Anderson Powerpoles

I need to clean up the wiring, get the battery box to stay in place, and i like to use bluetooth headset for the radio
 

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1999 Forester S 4EAT
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I have the Comet RS840 mount and the West Mountain Radio, IsoPWR battery isolator
Thanks for that; I'll have to look into it.

I really haven't found a good way to mount the battery box in the trunk.
My dual bander is just velcro-ed underneath the driver seat and extension cables used for the head and mic.
Does your radio have a detachable faceplate? If so, it could be mounted in one of the cargo area cubbies beneath the rear side windows. In fact, the battery and isolator could likely go in the one opposite it provided you use a battery of the right physical dimensions.

I need to clean up the wiring, get the battery box to stay in place, and i like to use bluetooth headset for the radio
If your car's headunit supports Bluetooth handsfree, it may be possible to feed the audio through it. You'll want to check the radio's Bluetooth capabilities for that, though.
 

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I'm here to HIJACK yo' thread!!!!
08 Forester 2.5
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Thanks for that; I'll have to look into it.



Does your radio have a detachable faceplate? If so, it could be mounted in one of the cargo area cubbies beneath the rear side windows. In fact, the battery and isolator could likely go in the one opposite it provided you use a battery of the right physical dimensions.



If your car's headunit supports Bluetooth handsfree, it may be possible to feed the audio through it. You'll want to check the radio's Bluetooth capabilities for that, though.
Dont want to sound stupid but where does the Comet RS840 mount
 

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2010 Forester 2.5X Prem A
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The RS840 is lip style mount. I have mine on the trunk hatch of my 2010. It should be able to fit on the hood as well. Comet also has a bundle called the HD-5M which is the 840 mount and a UHF\PL-259 coax assembly. the web says it will hold a an 80 inch antenna.

I should mention that Diamond antennas also makes similar mounts

I've used mine with a UHF to 3/8 adapter while stationary.

my friend used get this fiberglass antenna sticks that were tuned for CB and 2 meter amateur radio. I'd love to try one on the mount with a with the proper signal splitter. it would mean i would need to get a CB (it's on the todo list)

some advice, don't be an idiot like me, open the trunk with antenna mounted and crossbars on the roof. got my ham antenna caught and snapped it when i closed the trunk lid

frank
kb1qzh
 

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2004 Forester 2.5 XS 4 speed Automatic
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Not to start any :catfight: but, if you get 100 miles from home anywhere in the US, you'll find competent assistance faster on HAM than any CB. Many new rigs have emergency beacons and you'll have the local Cicil Air Patrol looking for you along with law enforcement faster than relying on some guy going down the interstate on a CB. Consider too, that you HAM rig can do that without you're having to say a word.

CBs are great for mobile to mobile along a trail for a group, but so is 2 meter HAM.

The main purpose of HAM communications is emergency operations, and to relay information. Any HAM, IMO, can be counted on to do what they say they will do, like make a long distance phone call for you. In my area, you never know which inbread has his CB on and will just mess with you leaving you stranded, they have no "ethical" obligation to assist as HAMs do.

Let me say too that my impression of Subbie owners is that they are a cut above many off roaders, obviously smarter and better informed for even owning the Subbie in the first place.

This is not to say that CB is not useful, since many law enforcement offices monitor CB that are near interstates, they do so too in order to "trick" traffic and radar checks as their cover is blown. If everyone is slowing down along a certain point because the truckers are reporting it, the officers can just move to a new spot as their objective has been met, keeping traffic slower in that area.

So IMO, it depends on what your trip is as to what to use. I have both. But if I really need help, I'll be getting on the HAM rig, for reliable competant assistance. In any terrain condition, a HAM rig will be more reliable and reach out touch more stations than a CB, Cbs run 5 watts, I run 50 watts on 2 meters. I have hit mobile stations in Kansas City regularly from Springfield, about 175 miles. I have done station to station to neighboring states. While you can do so with a CB with ideal conditions with "skip" I can do so reliably with a HAM rig.

As to the location, I have no idea where to put radios in my vehicle! I'd like to see some pics too. My ICOM 706 can be operated remotely, so I could put it under my seat and mount the face panel along the console. I could also use VOX, voice activated transmit with a head set and go hands free. I'd hate to have a mic cord hanging down to get snagged, or worse hanging down from the ceiling, not much headroom for that.

I like the idea of having a portable box with a rig that could be plug and play, just set in a seat or on the floor as needed. I also have HTs (handheld units) for any convoy.

PEACE! :icon_razz:
 

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Not to start any :catfight:
Too late :biggrin:

but, if you get 100 miles from home anywhere in the US, you'll find competent assistance faster on HAM than any CB.
Disagreed. The best assistance you'll find will be someone you can reliably contact and have act upon your message. Doesn't matter if it's a ham (note that it's not an acronym, so no need to capitalise it), CBer, or the guy with the cocoa tin at the other end of the string.

Many new rigs have emergency beacons and you'll have the local Cicil Air Patrol looking for you along with law enforcement faster than relying on some guy going down the interstate on a CB. Consider too, that you HAM rig can do that without you're having to say a word.
If you're talking about using your radio as a SPOT beacon, why not just use a SPOT beacon? Yeah, you could do something involving APRS or similar - and then hope that you can make contact with someone (or something in the case of a repeater) that can read or relay the positioning data you're sending to someone who can.

CBs are great for mobile to mobile along a trail for a group, but so is 2 meter HAM.
CB is also usually preferable to amateur radio for getting road conditions. If I want to know how far ahead of me the tailback I'm sitting in right now stretches, being on a repeater 25 miles away generally isn't as useful as speaking to the trucker a couple of miles up the road. Not to mention that most 4x4 clubs still use CB as their standard method of communication - and since someone in one of those groups stands a good chance of being a first responder depending on where you are, being able to reach them is a good idea.

And let's face it: ham radios aren't cheap. For something that's going in a vehicle for occasional use, the cost and licensing requirements aren't worth it for most folks when a $30 CB will let them talk to the next rig up the trail.

The main purpose of HAM communications is emergency operations, and to relay information.
Here's the problem: while that may be the intent, in practice it's not always going to work out that way. More:

Any HAM, IMO, can be counted on to do what they say they will do, like make a long distance phone call for you.
In 2000, I was travelling in a vehicle during a heavy rainstorm when I witnessed another vehicle spin out and go backwards into the centre divider at about 50mph. My cellphone had no service, so I pulled out the HT, found a an active repeater, scanned the PL tone, and clearly announced that I was making an emergency call and required immediate assistance. Know what I got? a 10-minute argument with the stereotypical crusty old ham about how this was a private repeater and I wasn't meant to be using it. The guy was even shouting down other hams who were trying to tell him to knock it off and let me speak.

Being then-new to radio, this was the first time I'd heard this happen. Sadly, it also wasn't the last. It doesn't matter how Part 97 says things are supposed to work; people and their egos will completely shoot that to pieces.

In my area, you never know which inbread has his CB on and will just mess with you leaving you stranded, they have no "ethical" obligation to assist as HAMs do.
Good to know that this 'inbred' only has an ethical obligation to assist when he's working amateur bands, not 11m. I'll bear that in mind if I ever hear an assistance call over CB.

Let me say too that my impression of Subbie owners is that they are a cut above many off roaders, obviously smarter and better informed for even owning the Subbie in the first place.
Well, obviously I'm just an idiot then for owning (or having owned) 4WD vehicles other than Subarus. But the condescendingly-patronising stereotyping is certainly appreciated.

This is not to say that CB is not useful, since many law enforcement offices monitor CB that are near interstates, they do so too in order to "trick" traffic and radar checks as their cover is blown. If everyone is slowing down along a certain point because the truckers are reporting it, the officers can just move to a new spot as their objective has been met, keeping traffic slower in that area.
Wait, where does this happen? Sorry, but I'm having a hard time believing that this would work for anyone other than the truckers since very few people actually have a CB in their vehicle anymore.

So IMO, it depends on what your trip is as to what to use. I have both.
A good plan.

But if I really need help, I'll be getting on the HAM rig, for reliable competant assistance.
The assistance is only going to be as competent or reliable as the person receiving and/or relaying your message. It's something you can't count on, but can hope for the best.

In any terrain condition, a HAM rig will be more reliable and reach out touch more stations than a CB,
Sorry, but this is just not correct. CB - much like the amateur bands - is a part of the radio spectrum, and both are influenced by external factors beyond anyone's control. Saying that one is more reliable or capable of reaching more stations is specious logic at best.

Cbs run 5 watts,
4W, to be exact.

I run 50 watts on 2 meters.
That's fine, but more power isn't necessarily the answer.

I have hit mobile stations in Kansas City regularly from Springfield, about 175 miles. I have done station to station to neighboring states. While you can do so with a CB with ideal conditions with "skip" I can do so reliably with a HAM rig.
And I've managed to QSO Cuba on 10m using 5W from where I am in Virginia. All that proves is that different bands behave differently and a good antenna really helps.

Seriously, though, it's not about one being better or worse than the other - both have different uses and different roles that they fulfill. But the reality is that in an oh-s*** situation, you're most likely to use whichever one is the most effective; simply dismissing either one really only cuts down on your potential ways of reaching someone.
 

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2004 Forester 2.5 XS 4 speed Automatic
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:catfight: LOL! What a scolding......LOL!

I agree with most all of what you said there Old Man, even the correction of my use of capitalization.

Gee, I can't remember everything in order, but

Given any condition in any terrain on the face of the earth, you'll have a better chance of making a contact with a ham rig than a CB. You are correct that it's not just more power, but it's an option the ham has, the CBer does not with 5 watts input to finals. 4 maybe 3 1/2 out, don't forget the antenna used, depending on what ya got. Try a moon bounce with a CB and see how that works at the bottom of the Grand Canyon.

Another issue is the spectrum, CBs have 11 meters and that's it. OTH, I can utilize the full amature band spectrum, I don't remember the last time I went to 40 meters and no one being there at any time of the day.

Totally agree it depends on who you get. I was speaking of "my area" southwest Missouri or northern Arkansas, where being an inbred means having a more robust immune system but a limited circle of friends. I just hear more drunks on CBs more than I do on any am. band, in my area. It might be because hams on HF pass out sooner due to their generally being older than the Techs and just can't party!

Going down any interstate on HF, you won't get much about road conditions that's for sure! And, I've never seen a ham rig in a tow truck either.

I can also go to the old phone patch (as may be equiped on some repeaters) or through a network monitored by the Red Cross and call anyone I need to. Not all RC offices are equiped, but they are in every region and manned 'round the clock by volunteers.

As an example too, immediately after the Joplin tornado and for several days thereafter, police, fire and civic communications were totally out. The primary means of communication were with hams for emergency communications, not CBs. The reason being is that the ham bands provide a more reliable means of communication over short or long distances in a wider variety of conditions.

I didn't mean to be vicious. Both have advantages over the other with hams have the greater advantage, weighing all the possibilities, IMO. Not being an expert off roader, I'm not sure what most clubs use, but I'd bet that the cost factor is very important, allowing everyone in the club to communicate without having a 2K investment vs. $50.00! CB is most practicle from a financial stand point.

OTH, most overlanders or expedition types crossing continents will have ham rigs more often than CBs, but again, probably both along with SAT phones being the primary means to get help or communicate.

My slam on CBer's was not to include all who have such rigs, certainly not, but any there are many more who just seem to use them to cuss out the old lady on his way home from the bar.....which is a sarcastic way of saying that there really isn't much observance of the rules by some who don't even send in the registration card out of the box. You would agree, I would think, that there is more professionalism with amature radio than with pirates on a CB. That was really my point and probably not very well inferred above.

I began my radio days in the 60's and in those days there was little love between CBers and hams, one getting on the radio and talking contstantly swapping receipts or fish stories and the other using the air waves to promote civil defense and professional radio techniques. Yes, the hams were the snobs back then and the CB antennas were attached to the tounge of the house. Relations between the two groups have improved greatly over the years between the two factions. IMO, most of the anamosity stems from CBers using linear amps that have always been illegal in the states, simply outlaws of the airways. But I think much of that has gone away and things have cleaned up, for the better.

Sorry to hear about your attempt to use a private repeater, if he didn't want it used, he should have turned it off, IMO. Further, you should have caught his call sign and reported him, even if it was private, the frequency is not and his interference with emergency communications is illegal and the guy should lose his license, IMO. Maybe since you were new at the time you didn't hold his feet to the fire for his actions, but you could have. Don't know what to tell ya, there are bad apples in every bushel, more in some than others.

Well, glad we agree and got all that cleared up.......

:Banane35:
 

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1118 2.5 Premium& XT tour Quadraphenia Electromatic & the CVT
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...

I just hear more drunks on CBs more than I do on any am. band, in my area. It might be because hams on HF pass out sooner due to their generally being older than the Techs and just can't party!...

Naw, they've just moved to 160 meters... after all it's only 3:30 AM... :shrug: the night is still young.

BTW - was thinking of ordering a 3rd crossbar to mount antennas from, using the other 2 as guy tiedowns... :icon_rolleyes:
 
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