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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I have an 19 Forester CVT and have a question about stopping engine step. In owner manual, the steps are as following:

1. Stop the vehicle completely.
2. Move the select lever to the “P”position.
3. Press the push-button ignition switch. The engine will stop, and the power will be
switched off.

But I use another steps(as below), I feel that it is easier to move to "P" in step4 (comparing with step2 in owner manual). The difference is slight, and maybe not a issue, but I am wondering what cause the difference and which one is better?
Thanks.

1. Stop the vehicle completely.
2. Move the select lever to the “N”position.
3. Press the push-button ignition switch. The engine will stop, and the power will be
switched acc.
4. Move the select lever to the “P”position.
3. Press the push-button ignition switch. The power will be switched off.
 

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2018 Forester XT Limited CVT
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If there are two parking brakes, one that is in the transmission, and one that uses the rear wheel brakes, and in the 2019 the wheel parking brakes are electric, then the second method above may engage the wheel brakes when the engine is switched off and the transmission is in neutral. Then you take your foot off the brake pedal and let the car roll and be held in place by the wheel brakes. Then you can move the transmission between gears and it should move between gears smoothly.

In method 1, when you put the transmission into park, there may be a parking pawl in the transmission that engages, and if the vehicle weight rests on that pawl, it will be more difficult to move the tranmission between positions.

I don't even know why the parking pawl exists. Manual transmissions don't have them, and the car is held in place while parked by the wheel brakes, and then the transmission is put into a gear in case the wheel brakes let go. There are some people who believe it is good practice to hold the car in place using the parking pawl, and that the parking brake is optional, but I think that is not smart and backwards.

Also maybe the parking brake is being engaged electrically automatically, in neutral. It is grabbing by the time you move the transmission to park. In method 1, maybe the parking brake is not engaged yet when you shift the transmission lever to park. The only experience I've had with the electric parking brakes is in my wife's car and in a 2019 Outback I had as a service loaner. I find the electric parking brakes to engage and disengage very slowly and they really get in the way. I'm very thankful my car (2018 Forester) has the normal manual parking brake.
 

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The electronic parking brake does NOT automatically engage - ever.. So the parking brake isn't a consideration as to the best method to use.

I would suggest using the Subaru recommend method because it's less steps and safer since the vehicle is in park sooner eliminating the risk that you forget to place in park after motor is stopped.

Last I normally engage the parking brake to protect the CVT in case someone runs into my vehicle while parked.
 

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If there are two parking brakes, one that is in the transmission, and one that uses the rear wheel brakes, and in the 2019 the wheel parking brakes are electric, then the second method above may engage the wheel brakes when the engine is switched off and the transmission is in neutral. Then you take your foot off the brake pedal and let the car roll and be held in place by the wheel brakes. Then you can move the transmission between gears and it should move between gears smoothly.

In method 1, when you put the transmission into park, there may be a parking pawl in the transmission that engages, and if the vehicle weight rests on that pawl, it will be more difficult to move the tranmission between positions.

I don't even know why the parking pawl exists. Manual transmissions don't have them, and the car is held in place while parked by the wheel brakes, and then the transmission is put into a gear in case the wheel brakes let go. There are some people who believe it is good practice to hold the car in place using the parking pawl, and that the parking brake is optional, but I think that is not smart and backwards.

Also maybe the parking brake is being engaged electrically automatically, in neutral. It is grabbing by the time you move the transmission to park. In method 1, maybe the parking brake is not engaged yet when you shift the transmission lever to park. The only experience I've had with the electric parking brakes is in my wife's car and in a 2019 Outback I had as a service loaner. I find the electric parking brakes to engage and disengage very slowly and they really get in the way. I'm very thankful my car (2018 Forester) has the normal manual parking brake.
Parking pawl is there in case the parking brake fails. In a manual the gear you put it in will keep if from moving, what's going to do that in an slushbox?

With any slushbox the proper way to park is put in park, apply the parking brake and then let your foot off the brake pedal. No one is taught that anymore.
 
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