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Can't you do one wheel at a time so three wheels remain on the ground?

I put a brick front & back of each wheel because some jacks can push the car away while they lift up. The head rises in an arc.

If I am working under a car, if I can fit them, I place two stands in the local area plus use the standard jack backed off with almost no load on it.
 

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Agree that gusset replacement is optimal solution, and for $120 not too pricey. However, be forewarned, the screws and bolts that hold everything together can be very difficult. I replaced the driver side first (logic being, that side was bothering me most), and after several hours of swearing, purchase of one of those old impact screw loosening devices, and just a lot of sweat and anger, I have left the passenger side for posterity......
Oh man, there is an EASY work around to the tight, soft-headed gusset bolts!

Use a ratcheting wrench with a philips socket. This allows you to put a massive downward force onto the head of the bolts to keep the bit from skipping/marring the screw heads. The length of the ratchet gives you enough torque to break the screws free.

I almost never use a screwdriver anymore on really stuck philips/flathead hardware, I just reach straight for the ratchet and socket.

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On jacking up the car to work on the rear end, I would lift on the up-hill side (shorter distance to the ground if it falls). Use both chocks on a single tire, DO NOT put one chock behind each tire.
 

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Do not use EPDM hose for gasoline!!! EPDM is used on RV roofs and the biggest no-no is that it will be damaged by cleaning products containing petroleum distillates!! Here is an online chart for EPDM Uses. it is alphabetically organized and just scroll down the list to gasoline. It lists EPDM as having a severe chemical effect from gasoline.
Here are a couple of snips:



All the way down tells you that:


"Ratings -- Chemical Effect
A = Excellent.
B = Good -- Minor Effect, slight corrosion
or discoloration.
C = Fair -- Moderate Effect, not recommended
for continuous use. Softening, loss of strength,
swelling may occur.
D = Severe Effect, not recommended for ANY use.
N/A = Information Not Available. "

Go here: EPDM Chemical Compatibility Results and return or dispose of the EPDM hose. If you use it on a fuel line it will corrode from the inside out and throw little pieces inside your fuels system eventually.

I have a website where when we were full time RVing we advised folks on the warranties and differences between the roof membranes and coatings. EPDM is the material used for most RV roofs and is commonly called a rubber roof. You did too much work to have a hose screw it all up. Here is a quote talking about RV EPDM and TPO roofing membranes.

"It should be noted, both RV roof types should not be exposed to solvents and oils. Additionally, avoid the use of cleaners that contain harsh chemicals, abrasives or petroleum-based products, these products can easily lead to significant amounts of damage to the roof."

That paragraph can be found here: https://www.crowsurvival.com/tpo-vs-epdm-rv-roof-which-is-best/ scroll all the way to the bottom, it is the second to last paragraph. I had the high pressure capillary copper line break on my second rig and it sprayed the refrigerant and some oil onto the EPDM roof that caused a discolored cracking area where it had coated the draining roof area for the A/C on my RV roof.
 

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Discussion Starter #284
Do not use EPDM hose for gasoline!!! EPDM is used on RV roofs and the biggest no-no is that it will be damaged by cleaning products containing petroleum distillates!! Here is an online chart for EPDM Uses. it is alphabetically organized and just scroll down the list to gasoline. It lists EPDM as having a severe chemical effect from gasoline.
Here are a couple of snips:



All the way down tells you that:


"Ratings -- Chemical Effect
A = Excellent.
B = Good -- Minor Effect, slight corrosion
or discoloration.
C = Fair -- Moderate Effect, not recommended
for continuous use. Softening, loss of strength,
swelling may occur.
D = Severe Effect, not recommended for ANY use.
N/A = Information Not Available. "

Go here: EPDM Chemical Compatibility Results and return or dispose of the EPDM hose. If you use it on a fuel line it will corrode from the inside out and throw little pieces inside your fuels system eventually.

I have a website where when we were full time RVing we advised folks on the warranties and differences between the roof membranes and coatings. EPDM is the material used for most RV roofs and is commonly called a rubber roof. You did too much work to have a hose screw it all up. Here is a quote talking about RV EPDM and TPO roofing membranes.

"It should be noted, both RV roof types should not be exposed to solvents and oils. Additionally, avoid the use of cleaners that contain harsh chemicals, abrasives or petroleum-based products, these products can easily lead to significant amounts of damage to the roof."

That paragraph can be found here: https://www.crowsurvival.com/tpo-vs-epdm-rv-roof-which-is-best/ scroll all the way to the bottom, it is the second to last paragraph. I had the high pressure capillary copper line break on my second rig and it sprayed the refrigerant and some oil onto the EPDM roof that caused a discolored cracking area where it had coated the draining roof area for the A/C on my RV roof.
Oh man, good to know that!

I actually found fuel hoses at my local AutoZone though so I never got to install the other one I had.. Thanks for that info.
 

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Discussion Starter #285
Can't you do one wheel at a time so three wheels remain on the ground?

I put a brick front & back of each wheel because some jacks can push the car away while they lift up. The head rises in an arc.

If I am working under a car, if I can fit them, I place two stands in the local area plus use the standard jack backed off with almost no load on it.
^^ Yeah I was doing this the whole time: placing the jack right under the cross member with no load just in case, plus of course having two stands one on each side. I was actually thinking the same thing.. working on one wheel at a time. And for extra safety, I'll even place the removed wheel laying on the floor directly under the car. I was just concerned about the elevation on the floor; one can't be too careful.

I have a feeling it's the rear brake drums..
 

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Discussion Starter #287
First 100 miles driven with the overhauled engine.. things are looking pretty good.

Motor seems to be working great! Super smooth idle about 700-800 rpm and with the hood closed, one can barely hear the engine running..
From time to time, while parked and seated in the car, I can feel very subtle up and down vibrations. I was thinking it could be the motor mounts, but they looked fine when I installed them. Doesn't really bother me much, though I wonder what it could be.

V Belt still has that squeaky annoying noise, especially when starting the engine from cold, then the noise goes away. Then it does it again sporadically when driving, but specially when turning the wheel to the max.. but after driving more than 10 mins, it's not heard again. I will try to rule out where the noise is coming from next week.

Still haven't been able to bleed air from coolant just to determine if rushing water sound in front of me when driving is from air trapped in the cooling system, or maybe the heater core needs to be flushed also, not sure.. after all, the car has almost 115K miles in it.

The only major issue now being that rear suspension noise, which I'm leaning more and more to it coming from a worn out wheel bearing. If it is, I think I'll just order a set of rear wheel hub assemblies. No sense in ordering a bearing since I don't have a press to get it in there, seen a few videos, pressing it in place is major work.

Power Steering Pump still needs an overhaul.. not leaking now though

Overall, I'm very happy with how things are going.
 

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The only major issue now being that rear suspension noise, which I'm leaning more and more to it coming from a worn out wheel bearing. If it is, I think I'll just order a set of rear wheel hub assemblies. No sense in ordering a bearing since I don't have a press to get it in there, seen a few videos, pressing it in place is major work.
I'm pretty sure you can't buy a new complete rear housing, or front housing assembly. As far as the bearings, pressing it in with a hydraulic press actually isn't the recommended way anymore, even though it is the standard procedure given in the service manual. It's better to use a front wheel bearing puller/installer kit.
Rear Wheel Bearing Replacement Walkthrough, with pics
I've done both of my rear wheel bearings, worst part was the seized bolts on the hub housing I had to remove to get the CV out. (it actually broke, ended up having to replace a rubber bushing when I cut the bolt out), I put gobs of anti-seize when I put them back together.
Also don't apply much grease, just packing the bearing, and a LITTLE bit on the seals is enough, too much grease and it will actually blow out your seals.
I actually need to replace my passenger rear housing. When replacing the bearing I noticed that the inner seal had popped out and was actually gouging out the inner part of the housing. When putting a new seal on I couldn't get it to seat properly... just left it to get my money's worth out of the new bearing :shrug: (you can't re-use a bearing you take out of the housing)
Pretty much if you decide to do the rear wheel bearings, spray PB Blaster on the housing bolts every day for several days before working on it :grin2:


You really should bleed the air out of the coolant system, air in the coolant can cause an air lock, or cavitation (which actually can erode some metals).
 

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Yeah the lateral link bolt can be a real pain to remove. It can corrode in the metal sleeves in the rubber bushings and make removal extremely difficult. I usually just cut the lateral link bolt and plan on replacing the rubber bushings in the end of the lateral link as you sometimes have to burn them out of the lateral link.

Pressed type of bearings can't be purchased assembled unless you purchase a used knuckle.

A screw type bearing removal/installation tool is the best option (Harbor Freight sells one) and an impact wrench makes it an easier job.
 

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Discussion Starter #290
I'm pretty sure you can't buy a new complete rear housing, or front housing assembly. As far as the bearings, pressing it in with a hydraulic press actually isn't the recommended way anymore, even though it is the standard procedure given in the service manual. It's better to use a front wheel bearing puller/installer kit.
Rear Wheel Bearing Replacement Walkthrough, with pics
I've done both of my rear wheel bearings, worst part was the seized bolts on the hub housing I had to remove to get the CV out. (it actually broke, ended up having to replace a rubber bushing when I cut the bolt out), I put gobs of anti-seize when I put them back together.
Also don't apply much grease, just packing the bearing, and a LITTLE bit on the seals is enough, too much grease and it will actually blow out your seals.
I actually need to replace my passenger rear housing. When replacing the bearing I noticed that the inner seal had popped out and was actually gouging out the inner part of the housing. When putting a new seal on I couldn't get it to seat properly... just left it to get my money's worth out of the new bearing <img src="http://www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/images/smilies/shrug.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Shrug" class="inlineimg" /> (you can't re-use a bearing you take out of the housing)
Pretty much if you decide to do the rear wheel bearings, spray PB Blaster on the housing bolts every day for several days before working on it <img src="http://www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/images/SubaruForester_2014/smilies/tango_face_grin.png" border="0" alt="" title="Big Grin" class="inlineimg" />


You really should bleed the air out of the coolant system, air in the coolant can cause an air lock, or cavitation (which actually can erode some metals).
I’ve seen the Harbor Freight bearing pulling kit you guys talk about. For sone reason suspension bearings tend to fail so much on Subarus, it might really justify buying that kit for the future. I’m buying Subaru cars from now on anyways..
From one of the videos I saw from Briansmobil, he recommended applying a bit of antiseize around the suspension and bearing components..
But I’m a little confused in what you guys are explaining.. isn’t the rear wheel bearing pressesed into the wheel hub assy? This is why I was saying, why not just replaced the whole wheel hub assembly instead of buying the inner bearings plus the HF pulling kit and having to do the job of pulling and pressing the bearing into the wheel hub? I saw a set of wheel hub assys for less than $100 online.. just saying.. I’m open for your opinions and still learning about this car.

Here’s a video by Briansmobile that better explains what I stated above.. it’s from a Legacy but in theory should be about the same for the Forester.. I think
https://youtu.be/fwHLNsHomkE

Definitely planning on bleeding the air from the coolant soon see if that water sound goes away..
 

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Discussion Starter #291
Yeah the lateral link bolt can be a real pain to remove. It can corrode in the metal sleeves in the rubber bushings and make removal extremely difficult. I usually just cut the lateral link bolt and plan on replacing the rubber bushings in the end of the lateral link as you sometimes have to burn them out of the lateral link.

Pressed type of bearings can't be purchased assembled unless you purchase a used knuckle.

A screw type bearing removal/installation tool is the best option (Harbor Freight sells one) and an impact wrench makes it an easier job.
I’m keeping my fingers crossed the long lateral link bolt is not seized in there in case I need to remove it.. being that my vehicle was always in South FL and from working in other areas of the car, things have come lose pretty well so far.. Brake pads in the front still had plenty of material.. working in the rear for that bearing I’ll check out the rear pads and emergency brake shoes as well. Hopefully everything is in good condition there.

Ran the vin number and found out the car was owned before by an older gentleman who barely drove the car and only put about 6K miles per year on it, maybe the reason why it’s in such great shape.
 

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YW! I just overhauled my Ford 601 Workmaster tractor carb and got it running again. The float needle had a grain of crud causing it to overflow and pour out a ten gallon tank of fresh fuel. I tore it down and found the three inch connector between the fuel filter and copper line was deteriorated too so I thought of this post I made about not using EPDM with any petroleum product.and hoped I got you in time.

I have not broken 100 miles on my new 2019 Forester yet. We just found a 2006 Baja for my wife, and just got it back from getting a new timing belt and tensioner, seals, and valve cover gaskets. The wife took her 2006 Baja Turbo to the car wash to get the pollen off. So once we sell the Ram 2500 Cummins truck, and the HHR, we will be a 100% Subaru family. We are moving to Colorado Springs a week from Monday, thus the desire for all AWD vehicles. I had a 1978 Brat the last time we lived there in 1978-1981.

Good luck with the rest of your work on yours.
 

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I’ve seen the Harbor Freight bearing pulling kit you guys talk about. For sone reason suspension bearings tend to fail so much on Subarus, it might really justify buying that kit for the future. I’m buying Subaru cars from now on anyways..
From one of the videos I saw from Briansmobil, he recommended applying a bit of antiseize around the suspension and bearing components..
But I’m a little confused in what you guys are explaining.. isn’t the rear wheel bearing pressesed into the wheel hub assy? This is why I was saying, why not just replaced the whole wheel hub assembly instead of buying the inner bearings plus the HF pulling kit and having to do the job of pulling and pressing the bearing into the wheel hub? I saw a set of wheel hub assys for less than $100 online.. just saying.. I’m open for your opinions and still learning about this car.

Here’s a video by Briansmobile that better explains what I stated above.. it’s from a Legacy but in theory should be about the same for the Forester.. I think
https://youtu.be/fwHLNsHomkE
The hub and bearing assembly came in the next phase after our model. (04+, as shown in the video on a 2005), our 2001 Forester has the pressed in only hub and knuckle, the double bearing is actually pressed into the knuckle, with the hub spindle being pressed in after. So in short, you can't buy a hub and bearing assembly that you can just bolt on. But if you do find one let me know, and prove me wrong!

The walk-through link I shared will give you enough info on tools needed, etc. But if you have questions, I'm around. Mine's a S model though, so have rear disk brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #296
The hub and bearing assembly came in the next phase after our model. (04+, as shown in the video on a 2005), our 2001 Forester has the pressed in only hub and knuckle, the double bearing is actually pressed into the knuckle, with the hub spindle being pressed in after. So in short, you can't buy a hub and bearing assembly that you can just bolt on. But if you do find one let me know, and prove me wrong!

The walk-through link I shared will give you enough info on tools needed, etc. But if you have questions, I'm around. Mine's a S model though, so have rear disk brakes.
I see now how it is, I have a better idea how things go in there.... I’d have to get the HF bushing press kit and puller anyway.
Replacing the entire rear hub assy with the bearing would have been ideal thing since it’s only 4 bolts retaining it in place, but as you said it’s not the case for the SFs.
I googled the cost of this job and I tell you what though.. if it does turn out to the the rear bearings that are damaged, I’m not paying $800-$960 for this job. I’m going to try it myself.
 

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I see now how it is, I have a better idea how things go in there.... I’d have to get the HF bushing press kit and puller anyway.
Replacing the entire rear hub assy with the bearing would have been ideal thing since it’s only 4 bolts retaining it in place, but as you said it’s not the case for the SFs.
I googled the cost of this job and I tell you what though.. if it does turn out to the the rear bearings that are damaged, I’m not paying $800-$960 for this job. I’m going to try it myself.
It's definitely a DIY job if you have the tools. HF kit, an electric impact and a large wrench can get the job done. Save yourself some aggravation and have new lateral link bolt/washers/nut/bushings on hand and return if not used. Buy a new wheel hub too (Dorman makes one) and put the bearing in the freezer for a day before you put it in.
 

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Discussion Starter #298
It's definitely a DIY job if you have the tools. HF kit, an electric impact and a large wrench can get the job done. Save yourself some aggravation and have new lateral link bolt/washers/nut/bushings on hand and return if not used. Buy a new wheel hub too (Dorman makes one) and put the bearing in the freezer for a day before you put it in.
Yes, my 1/2 drive Ridgid impact drill has a lot of torque, should be able to handle it easily, removing the lug nuts with it was a breeze..
Thanks for the info on the parts, hoping the lateral bolt is not seized in there.
From the videos I saw, most people rear bearings sounded like they were about to fall off the rear suspension. Mine is not bearly as bad, just a low grinding noise for now, I’m sure it might get worse with time though.
One person stated the bearing shrunk about 1 thousands after 1 day in the freezer like you stated. Just enough to make it go in easier. Wished I could get a hold of some liquid nitrogen, it would have that bearing ready in minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #299
In an effort to eliminate the rushing water sound, I burped the cooling system today.
Left engine running 15-20 mins till fans finally turned on. I saw many air bubbles come out throughout the process, especially once engine was running at operating temperature. Then I let the engine cool down and went for test drive.
Water rushing noise remains at startup and when taking off, but it is heard much less than before.. then dissipates and seems to disappear completely once car been driven for a while..
I’m guessing there’s still some air trapped in there.
I’d like to repeat the process and leave it running maybe 1/2 hr-40 mins next time..
 

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