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2004 Forester XT
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190 Posts
When I changed mine, there wasnt nearly enough room to take the clamp off of the line at the base of the turbo. You can access the bottom clamp on ther oil return line (but is a a very tight spot). Good luck.
 

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'05 FXT
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114 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
When I changed mine, there wasnt nearly enough room to take the clamp off of the line at the base of the turbo. You can access the bottom clamp on ther oil return line (but is a a very tight spot). Good luck.
Thanks, got it. Wound up pulling up on the turbo and pushing down on the hose with a screwdriver at the same time. Once it broke loose, came right on out... :)
 

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'05 FXT
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114 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Just replacing a blown TD04. Taking a break until the temperature drops this evening. :)
 

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05 FXT
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1,540 Posts
For future reference, just yank. You can get the hose clamp off with a really long set of needle nose, or if you're super pissed and have smaller hands, you can bury your hand from under and get to the clamp.

After messing w/ that hose for hours on end the first time, I've found the "knack" for it.

To reassemble, put the hose on the turbo w/ the clamp in the right position. You'll have to "clock" the clamp so it doesn't interfere w/ the up-pipe bracket.

Then when installing the turbo, first set it on the studs and get the turbo inlet on, or close to on. Then lift the turbo back up a hair and massage the oil return hose back down and on. At that point everything should mate up.

Make sure the hose did actually slide down properly and didn't just kink. Good luck!
 

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'05 FXT
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114 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
After some experimenting and many foul words muttered...

I loosened the hex screw that secures the intake hose to the front of the manifold, which seemed to let the intake hose move a little more. Then, put the turbo into the intake, shoved it forward about as hard as I could and got the oil drain pipe on (slipped it down into it.) Then lined the bolts up.

This project's reminding me why I don't tinker with cars more.
 

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2004 Forester automatic
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62 Posts
Does this need to be replaced with an OEM part? The one I just took off feels rigid in the center and soft on the ends. Is this to prevent expansion/bursting? No one around has one. Thanks!
 

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2004 Forester XT
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931 Posts
Does this need to be replaced with an OEM part? The one I just took off feels rigid in the center and soft on the ends. Is this to prevent expansion/bursting? No one around has one. Thanks!
I'd like to know the same thing. Also, are we talking about the turbo oil return line? Is there an aftermarket line available if so?
 

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1999 Forester S Turbo 5MT
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1,960 Posts
I've had mine off a dozen times and I never use the top clamp on the oil return hose because it's a gravity feed and I personally think it's ok without the clip (If it were a high pressure return then that would be a different matter). As suggested above, give it a really good pull (but look at my comments on the turbo inlet pipe first) because there's nothing to break in that area, the hose itself is very strong and IMHO, unlikely to break or need renewal. I lift the turbo and leave the rubber hose in place on the engine return mount, facing up (with the clip attached at the bottom) however, before re-installing I use the oil return stem from the bottom of the turbo (before I refit it to the main body) to make sure it slides smoothly into the hose, a little grease works for me but the alloy return stem has been filed, rounded, sanded and polished to make sure any possible edges that might snag are removed.

When putting the turbo back you need to realign it with the up pipe studs, the oil return and the turbo inlet pipe lip (also depending on whether you removed the exit pipe from the turbo or not depends on whether those three studs need to be lined up too). The inlet pipe soft lip requires your attention as do the other two points and a strong light of some sort is recommended but if the oil return does go in correctly you should feel it, like a well lubed **** "sliding in" but if the whole turbo feels rubbery and is not mating up to/dropping right down on the up pipe studs then the alloy stem has likely caught the edge of the hose. Back up, check the hose isn't kinked, fix it with your finger if it has and go again. I used to mark the side of the alloy pipe to make sure at least an inch of stem had gone in which is visible briefly until turbo body slides over the up pipe studs.

The inlet pipe lip is very delicate and requires a considered approach prior to removal, easing it back gently until you are satisfied it is 'free' on the turbo inlet because the soft lip can become adhered to the metal turbo inlet and might rip if you just pull it. Refitting is just a reversal but make sure the turbo inlet is smooth and clean, I also run some light grease around the outside of the metal opening and inside the inlet pipe lip, this makes a huge difference to getting them mated. The outer jubilee clip for this fitting has also been sanded, polished and greased inside as the previous one pinched and eventually broke the lip. Most of these things will become apparent at the time.
 

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2004 Forester automatic
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62 Posts
So I bought the oem part and its not rigid like my old one, so I see no reason the heater hose wouldn't work.
 

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2004 Forester XT
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931 Posts
So I bought the oem part and its not rigid like my old one, so I see no reason the heater hose wouldn't work.
Thanks for this info!

What is the function of this line? Does it go back to the oil pan?

Is it the same as what is called the "turbo return line" on some cars?

Do you have a part number by chance??

I need to get one ordered soon!
 
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