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Ze flying Russian
2007 STI
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2,008 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. I was changing front brake pads on my Forester and the space between the new ones is too narrow to put the caliper back on the rotor. I thought that changing pads does not require bleeding to "deflate" piston. How to overcome this?
 

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The Modfather
2019 Impreza 5dr Sport - Manual
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8,053 Posts
you need to push the piston back into the caliper to make room. There is a tool but you can use a C-Clamp and the old pad. Search Scoobymods I have stuff there that will help
 

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Ze flying Russian
2007 STI
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2,008 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Peaty said:
you need to push the piston back into the caliper to make room. There is a tool but you can use a C-Clamp and the old pad. Search Scoobymods I have stuff there that will help
I didn't find it on ScoobyMods (I'll serach again) but that's exactly what I was trying. I guess I was not using the C-Clamp the way I should. :roll:

Thanks Peaty, at least now I know I'm on the right way. :)
 

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Premium Member
'09 STI
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4,129 Posts
If you've recently added fluid, you may need to siphon some out of the reservoir. When you push the pistons back in, that extra fluid will have to go somewhere and that'll be all over your engine compartment.
 

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Administrator
2018 2.5i Premium CVT
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18,679 Posts
I used to do it on my VWs with the handle of a set of pliers. It had a nice curve to it that stuffed the piston way back into the cylinder.
 

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Ze flying Russian
2007 STI
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2,008 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
NahdaDamdyke said:
If you've recently added fluid, you may need to siphon some out of the reservoir. When you push the pistons back in, that extra fluid will have to go somewhere and that'll be all over your engine compartment.
Oh, thanks, I'll check on that.
 

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Premium Member
'09 STI
Joined
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4,129 Posts
Try and imagine the size of your pistons displacing the fluid in your reservoir and that's the amount you'll need to draw off. You may need to do this each time you press a wheels pistons back in as sucking the reservoir dry isn't recommended.

Don't know if you're aware of it , but brake fluid eats paint (except DOT5 but I still wouldn't spill it!) so proper clean up is a must!
 

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If you use a C-clamp, I think it's easier to leave the pad in place and push the pad (which in turn pushes the piston) with the C-clamp.
 

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The Modfather
2019 Impreza 5dr Sport - Manual
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8,053 Posts
Even with that tool I have you should put in a pad it's easier. I took that pic quickly, I should have thrown in a pad.
 
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just repalced my discs and pads. used the old pads and clamp and pused the piston back in. easy just watch the brake fluid

Matt W
 

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1998 Forester "S" lifted. Bog-o-matic
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Peaty said:
Even with that tool I have you should put in a pad it's easier. I took that pic quickly, I should have thrown in a pad.

Plus putting a pad in between the piston and the tool will help distribute the force evenly across the piston and help keep it from going cockeyed.
 
K

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Hondaslayer said:
Plus putting a pad in between the piston and the tool will help distribute the force evenly across the piston and help keep it from going cockeyed.
Two things:

Be careful you don't mess up the dust boot on the piston, you can pinch/rip it pretty easily if you aren't careful pushing back.

Second, when you push the piston back, it is good to open the bleeder screw. Then all the crapped up brake fluid in your caliper is expelled, not pushed back up into the brake line. You should be bleeding the brakes anyhow, so if you get rid of some of the nasty fluid in the pistons beforehand, it is a good thing.

Kyle
 
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