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2017 Forester
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I drive a Subaru Forester - 2017 2.5i. Got a nail in tire, will lose air if I remove it. It's a Yokohoma Geolander (OEM)

  • Should I replace all 4 tires if can't be patched?
  • Had the same issue 6 months ago; roadside assistance helped apply a patch and was great.

Any brand recommendations instead of this OEM tires please? Priority is great freeway grip, an all season.

Thank you
 

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Sahuarita, AZ 2018 Forester Limited
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So long as a new tire's tread depth is within 3/32" of your most worn remaining tire, you won't have to replace all four. If the new tire tread is more than 3/32" difference than your most worn remaining tire, have the new tire shaved to match the tread depth of your other three tires. If you decide to replace all four tires, there are lots of existing threads on tire recommendations. Use the site search feature.
 

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Sahuarita, AZ 2018 Forester Limited
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Had the same issue 6 months ago; roadside assistance helped apply a patch and was great.
Did roadside assistance patch it or plug it? Patching would have required breaking down the tire from the rim which I think would be beyond roadside assistance's call of duty. If it simply plugged I would suggest taking it to a tire shop and having it repaired properly with a patch.
 

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Having traveled all over Australia including lots of very rough tracks, high speed dirt, horrible corrugations on both AT and MT tires using plugs for repairs I have no qualms about using plugs without any subsequent patching. I keep the tires on both vehicles in good condition and have never ever experienced any issues from using just plugs on any vehicle past or present.
 

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2011 Subaru Forester
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I wonder if the concern about plugs is more a cold climate problem? I have read that plugs self-vulcanize with the adjacent rubber and hence can be super long-lasting. However, I also know that in Canada it's considered improperly repaired and it's said to be an emergency short-term fix.
 

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2018 Forester XT Limited CVT
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1,107 Posts
Maybe a large part of it is that when you use a plug, you can't inspect the inside of the tire, and the wheel, for damage or other problems. If you take the tire off the wheel you can inspect, and then put a patch or one of those mushroom patches on, with the adhesives etc. And then you can rebalance.

Having said that, I've run tires with multiple plugs for years before replacing the tires when they wore out. I'm more worried about drivetrain problems from using a compact spare than I am about plugs, but maybe I'm in the wrong.
 

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2017 Forester
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all for feedback. My Subaru just has 39,000 miles on this. Thread on the tire looks good - between 4&5. At discount tires now
541798
to see if they can patch. The nail is a bit towards the edge. So gotta see. Attached the image here.
 

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2017 Forester
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Did roadside assistance patch it or plug it? Patching would have required breaking down the tire from the rim which I think would be beyond roadside assistance's call of duty. If it simply plugged I would suggest taking it to a tire shop and having it repaired properly with a patch.
Think he plugged in rubber after removing the rim. Looks it’s time to replace the tire 😢
 

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2016 Forester 2.5i
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You will be shocked at how much better any decent tire is especially in inclement weather. 40k on factory tires isn't worth buying even one. That nail looks pretty close to the edge. I think you might be out of luck getting it fixed.

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2017 Forester
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did you mean just change all 4 tires than 1 since it’s almost 40k on these tires or is it too soon to replace, ideally? Yeah, looks this can’t be repaired.
 

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2016 Forester 2.5i
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At 40k miles I would replace all 4. Its not to soon. There is no warranty on those tires at all mileage wise so no gauge of proper life span. Myself and 3 close friends all have 2016-2017 and no one has their factory tires. 1 is like me and obsessed with tires other 2 couldnt care less about tires but are still really happy with the new ones. None of us put more that 45k miles on the factory tires. I took mine off at 23k after driving a season on the snow and as a long time Subaru owner and snow driver I was nervous the grip was so bad. Its like getting a whole new car for the price of a set of tires.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Wow.. that’s great to know. Thank you. I’m thinking to buy Michelin this time than Yokohama and try. Yokohama is good but a little unnerving in wet conditions. Maybe it’s not the tire itself but my experience in NC mountains.
 

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2004 Forester XS 5MT
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Get better new tires, dont waste any time or money on tires that came off the lot and have mileage on them, as others have stated. Once you get some "real" tires you will be shocked at how you got by on the baloney-skins that came with the car, kinda like the crappy battery, LOL!
 

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2016 Forester 2.5i
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Its not just you. I had that tire and the geolandar g015 at. The difference is mind blowing. The g015s would go through snow with confidence up to the point that the car high centers. If I didn't offroad my car I would put a solid Michelin A/S on it and enjoy good grip. As it stands I'm on my 3rd set of A/T tires on this car. I was too hard on the g015 off road(its a fantastic street foul weather tire) and switched to the toyo at3 which is overkill but awesome.

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If it's a small nail or screw (this doesn't look like a big one), patching is better than plugging. The problem with plugging is that you need to push the tool through the hole, which will damage the internal structure of the tire (the steel belts).

This looks like it may not even have gone through all the way. You can put a bit of water (or, spit... ew!) on the head of the screw to see if it's actually leaking. And if it doesn't appear to be leaking, just pull it out. To play it safe, you could drive to a place where they do tire repairs and pull the screw out in their lot. If it turns out it's leaking after all, they can deal with it for you.
 
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