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2010 Forester 2.5 XPremium 4EAT
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My method for raising my car up to do things like wheel rotations, etc.

I'm sharing this in case it helps anyone else out and also to invite comments / suggestions for how my way of doing it could be improved or changed, especially from a saftey standpoint. Plus, writing it all out helps me be clear in my mind that I have recall of all the steps of my procedure.

For example, does anyone have any views regarding whether the front should be lifted first or the rear? I know there are easier ways of lifting a car but the point of this article is to share how I do it with the equipment that I have available.

I'm one of these gals whose mantra is "If you want it done right, do it yourself" (Thanks, Mum!)

So one of my pet stresses is when the garages use air tools on my wheels and just generally rush the job with the inevitable damage to wheel bolts / nuts, over torquing etc. So I do it myself. This is my equipment:

  • 1 x 3 ton trolley / floor jack
  • 4 x 3 ton axle stands with safety bars
  • 4 x metal wheel chocks
I'm blessed with having a garage with a level floor.

  1. Check that the car is in 'Park' and the handbrake is applied.
  2. Make sure the car is parked such that access can be gained easily and safely to all wheels and to the underside of the front and rear of the car.
  3. Place an axle stand near to the 4 jacking points on the side subframe of the car
  4. Chock the rear wheels, 2 chocks on each
  5. Place trolley jack under the front of the car using the designated jacking point under the front diff. Check your Owner's Manual.
  6. Now lift the front of the car with the trolley jack until you have just enough clearance to place the front axle stands underneath the designated jack points on each side of the front subframe.
  7. Place the front axle stands in the correct orientattion relative to the subframe such that the side jack points on the subframe, when the car is lowered, will engage correctly with the V of the axle stand.
  8. Check that each axle stand is set to the same height.
  9. Once you're happy that the axle stands are lined up, the height is equal both sides of the car and the saftey bars engaged, SLOWLY lower the trolley jack until the car is resting on the two front axle stands. An assistant is invaluable here ;)
  10. Double check each front axle stand to make sure everything is as it should be. If not, lift front of car and repeat.
  11. Place trolley jack under designated rear jacking point, usually under rear diff. Tip - Be careful to place the lifting cup such that it sits the other side of the metal rim casing of the diff and not over the rim, which could cause damage.
  12. Now lift the rear of the car with the trolley jack until you have enough clearance to place the rear axle stands underneath the designated jack points on the each side of the rear subframe.
  13. Place the rear axle stands in the correct orientattion relative to the subframe such that the side jack points on the subframe, when the car is lowered, will engage correctly with the V of the axle stand.
  14. Once you're happy that the axle stands are lined up, the height is equal both sides of the car and the saftey bars engaged, SLOWLY lower the trolley jack until the car is resting on the two rear axle stands. An assistant is invaluable here ;)
  15. Remove the trolley jack and 4 chocks and stow them away so they won't become a trip hazard when you start working on the car.
  16. Before you start work, go around the car and double / triple check that all 4 axle stands are secure, the safety bars are engaged (if fitted) and that you are as happy as you can be that everything is secure.
  17. If you have any doubts at all, stop and redo everything. People get crushed underneath cars every year, you just don't hear about it.
  18. Once you're finished working and are ready to lower the car -
  19. Check that car is still in 'Park' and handbrake is applied
  20. Check that the axle stands haven't moved and that they look / feel secure
  21. Lift the rear of the car with trolley jack as per item 11. Lift the car only enough that there is sufficient clearance to safely pull the rear axle stands away from the subframe. An assistant is invaluable here ;) Stow the axle stands out of harms way.
  22. With the rear axle stands removed, SLOWLY lower the trolley jack and then remove it.
  23. Now loosely chock the rear wheels. This means placing the chocks so that there will be appx 1 inch clearance between tyre edge and chock when the car is lowered. If you place the chocks too close to the tyres, they will be very hard to remove when you lower the car and you could damage your tyre.
  24. With the rear chocks in place, lift the front of the car as per item 6. Lift the car only enough that there is sufficient clearance to safely pull the front axle stands away from the subframe. An assistant is invaluable here ;) Stow the axle stands out of harms way.
  25. With the front axle stands removed, SLOWLY lower the trolley jack and then remove it.
  26. Remove the chocks from around the rear wheels.
So that's how I do it. I welcome any comments, thoughts or suggestions (apart from "get a garage electric lift system' ;) ) .

Tip - If you are removing any wheels, loosen the wheel nuts before lifting the car off the ground. Easy mistake to make!!

Tip - I torque all my wheel nuts before the wheels are lowered back onto the ground. I find I can do this by holding the wheel steady in my lap and with my knees and left arm, whilst whilst torquing the wheel nuts with my right hand. I torque mine (standard alloys on 2010 Forester Premium) to 75lbs.

Thanks for reading! 馃拫
 

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2010 Forester A
Joined
24 Posts
Nice write up. I basically went through this exact procedure a few weeks back when I did my first 5 tire rotation at home. Can you expand on point 11 on where yourt placing the cup of the trolley jack? I think I know what you mean about the rim, but are you saying to place the cup further (deeper under the car) on the diff and not on that edge that sticks out a little lower on the rear edge of the diff? I did place the cup under that and it seemed ok but if it's a bad idea then I'll adjust going forward. One thing I found added a bit of piece of mind but not necessary by any means was the little rubber cups you can place on the top of each jack stand. Car seems to rest more comfortably on the stands that way and they weren't too expensive. Could probably diy something similar as well if you're crafty. Happy trails!
 

Registered
2010 Forester 2.5 XPremium 4EAT
Joined
863 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi

If you imagine looking underneath the car from the rear down towards the diff you'll see a metal edge / rim to the diff that you need to clear with the jack lifting cup. I have a heavy duty rubber circle on mine to try and minimise metal on metal contact. So you haver to beyond the rim and then come back again with the cup so that it rests against the rim of the diff and not over it, if that makes sense.

I was thinking about adding the rubber covers to the jack stand tops.
 
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