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Premium Member
2019 Forester Sport CVT
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538 Posts
Discussion Starter #421
So, I decided to go forward with the spacer kit from Primitive. I wanted to gain the full 2” lift and with the already installed subframe correction, I did not see why this would not work. All in all, the car rides great at this height. Even some scary terrain, the car cleared with no problem at all. This combo of stiff springs and a full 2” lift is amazing! The car does feel a little taller and more importantly, the stiffer springs prevent the big bounces that you will get off-road which aids in more bottom out potential. More bounce also produces an unpleasant off-road experience as you will feel like a pinball. I just can’t say enough about how happy I am with this overall package.



I will also add that during some fast speed off-roading today I did appreciate the stiffer steering after installing the Perrin steering dampener. I really could not appreciate it that much on the road, but off-road, wow! Steering is precise and this car feels so good on the rough terrain.



I plan to get a realignment done tomorrow, hopefully. At speed, the car handles fine with no shaking at all, but I want to make sure since I did change the ride height. I also observe no changes or faults with Eyesight. That seems fine.



To install the spacers you do have to pop out the pressed in top bolts. The best way to do this is to install the spacers when replacing springs. You really need to pull the top hat off to easily press out the studs. Obviously, I did not want to remove the springs since you need a shop press to reinstall them. So, I made some mods to the plastic retainer in order to pop out the studs and insert the longer ones supplied by Primitive.



I don’t have the best photos for this install, but here goes with what I have.



Primitive Racing Spacer Lift-1 This is a stock photo. It shows the 3 hole front spacers and the 2 hole rear spacers. Each spacer has a threaded insert so it keeps the spacer anchored in place. These are made of black Derlin. Super strong and stealthy looking. When the strut caps are back in place, you cannot see these at all. Even with the caps off they are hard to see because they have cutouts in the middle unlike some other spacers.
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Primitive Racing Spacer Lift-2 I used a dremel tool to grind down the plastic in order to make room for the stud to be removed. I tried to pound it out with a 4lb hammer, but no go. The metal hat will bend too, if not careful.
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Primitive Racing Spacer Lift-3 The solution I came up with was to use a vise. You will need something on the backside to seat on the vice face so you have room to press out the stud. I used a hitch pin. It had a nice handle curve that was able to sit around the ear of the top hat and fit pretty well.
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Primitive Racing Spacer Lift-4 I placed the strut in the vice with hitch pin and squeezed out the stud. When you do this, or if you try to pound it out with a hammer, make sure you thread on the stock nut so you can press/pound on this and not the stud itself.
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Primitive Racing Spacer Lift-5 You can see the stud has to come out and it wont unless you completely remove the spring and pull the top hat off, or you can dremel out a piece of plastic and push the stud out. It still required some hammering and lifting with a screwdriver to get the angle just right.
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Primitive Racing Spacer Lift-6 In this step I had to pound the new longer stud into place. When doing so, you will crush the threads a little bit as you hammer. I would then use the original nuts and thread them all the way to the top hat. This will smooth out the threads and not ruin your new nuts that come with the spacer kit.
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Primitive Racing Spacer Lift-7 This is another stock photo. My springs are black and the plastic at the top cap looks different on my strut tower as seen in the other photos. I forgot to take a picture with the spacers installed, so I added this stock photo. What I like about these spacers is there stealthy look. They have a cutout in the middle, so when installed you don’t see them and the strut caps fit back into place perfectly. The spacers has threaded inserts so this holds the stud in place and nothing moves. Now it is ready to put back into the car.
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Primitive Racing Spacer Lift-8 Everything went back together as planned and I retorqued everything.
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Primitive Racing Spacer Lift-9 For the rear struts, there is nothing to dremel. I used the press again and used a 14mm socket over the stud. This fit perfect and gave room for the stud to move out.
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Primitive Racing Spacer Lift-10 Out at the local reservoir I took this shot. You can see a little more ride height. Looks great and performs even better.
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This install was pretty quick. It took about 6 hours. If I were to do this again, I would definitely add the spacers with the Primitive King Spring Lift all at the same time. The spacers cost $200 with shipping for the set of 4. I went with ¾” spacers for front and rear.
 

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2019 Forester Sport CVT
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538 Posts
Discussion Starter #422
ARB Awning Install​



This install was fast. About 30 minutes total with the LP Adventure bracket kit that is designed for the Yakima Loadwarrior and Megawarrior baskets. I went out on the local dirt road that I love so much. Even with the ARB awning installed I was flying down this road. No bottom outs and no rattles from the awning.



Here are the install photos



ARB Awning Install-1 This was a little challenging to do alone due to the size of the awning, but I managed. I went with the 2500 x 3000 size. This is 6.5 feet long (front to back of car) by 8.2 feet wide (distance when rolled out from car). The awning cost $315.
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ARB Awning Install-2 Here is a look at the LP Adventure bracket through the sunroof. This was $30 and made installation a breeze. It is a simple plate with stainless steel hardware. The bracket will sandwich 2 down tubes on the Yakima basket.
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ARB Awning Install-3 Getting ready to roll it out for the first time. I went with the smaller length and this is perfect for 2 people. The longer 8.2 feet version will really extend out in front of the car and I did not want that road noise or look. I am happy with this version on the Forester.
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ARB Awning Install-4 Unzip the canopy and I pulled it out and placed it on top of the canopy to expose the support tubes.
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ARB Awning Install-5 This was a lot harder to erect then I thought it would be. I had to fight the weight while trying to extend the poles. This is definitely a two person job. I finally got it setup.
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ARB Awning Install-6 I bought the LED light strip package. It has a cool controller that changes light intensity and color from white to yellow to mixed white/yellow). The dimmer feature was cool.
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ARB Awning Install-7 I also purchased the awning room with floor. This was another $210 and a pretty handy tent/room for mountain bike storage at a race. I was just doing a dry run, so nothing was staked out. It was a little windy too, so you definitely need to stake it out.
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ARB Awning Install-8 Here is a look at the interior away from the car. Very roomy and doors on each side of the tent (Front of car and rear of car entrywa
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ys)



ARB Awning Install-9 Here is a look at the interior towards the car. The room has a zipper feature so you can get inside the vehicle. I think this was allow me to turn on the AC and open the vent to cool down the tent a little bit. Not sure this will work, but a few events we attend every year in AZ can get hot and this would be a great way to hide from the heat and rest at an Ultra event.
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ARB Awning Install-10 Here is another look at the outside front door access point. The big windows can be unzipped to expose a bug net. This lets you be cool but bug free. To enter the tent you unzip the middle zipper between the two bug net windows.
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This was a fast setup and test. I hope to have more time this weekend to play. This was a really cool investment that I think will pay off with my lifestyle.
 

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2019 Forester Li
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14 Posts
The error code, U0824 is a direct result of removing the shutter assembly and motor. At first, I thought I could just reattach the motor and the problem would be solved. It worked until the car heated up and the motor just free spun since the shutter was removed and the error code returned.



There were no instructions regarding what to do with the shutter assembly, so I really wonder what others have done. I can’t imagine I was the only person that got the error code. Maybe others reinstalled the whole assembly, but I don’t think it was possible. I chose not to drop the bumper to try it out. It just did not look possible.



So, here are the photos and mod instructions.



Shutter Motor Mod-1 The first thing I did was pull the motor and marked the open position. This is how I found the assembly. I plugged it in and did a test. After turning on the ignition without starting, the motor turns the shutter closed. I then pulled the motor and marked this position. I located the motor near the harness on the driver side and secured it in place. After going for a test drive, the engine heated up and the motor free spinned and the error code returned. I consulted Dr. Google and I saw other people making mods for different cars. Essentially, the motor must meet resistance and have a stopping point. So, I decided the best mod is one that involved parts of the shutter itself.
View attachment 533508


Shutter Motor Mod-3 The first thing I did was use that trusting jig saw and cut off the shutter. I retained the spindle that fits the motor. If you look close you will see the spindle has a raised section in the middle of the shaft. This stopper will prevent the spindle from free turning. I did a lot of modding to this piece to get it right. It was small and functional. Perfect.
View attachment 533509


Shutter Motor Mod-4 With the shutter gone, the spindle had nothing to keep it from working its way out of the motor. So, I used a pipe holder and screwed this into the end piece. Now, the spindle has nowhere to go.
View attachment 533510


Shutter Motor Mod-5 I mounted the motor and zip tied the modified shutter assembly in the same general area as I did before. This mod works! The car now thinks the shutter is functional and it will move the modified parts as if it were whole.
View attachment 533511


This mod took about an hour.





So, now I just had to wait for night time to do some light aiming and testing. Then I wanted to explore a back country rough road for another test. I did some still shots, but a video really does the trick on showcasing the differences in lighting while driving. So, I will just share a few photos and then you can check out the 3 videos.



The OEM LEDs have that very distinctive black bar where the light ends. The problem with this off road is that when you bounce in and out of terrain, there is a portion of the road you just can’t see. The videos show this very well. For this still test, I found a curve in the road and I turned the lights on one at a time so you can see the difference in lighting patterns.



LED Off road Still Test_Lo beam
View attachment 533512


LED Off road Still Test_Hi beam
View attachment 533513


LED Off road Still Test_Lo beam-DD Fog Nice yellow hue and very low to the road and wide.
View attachment 533514


LED Off road Still Test_Lo beam-DD Fog-BO Combo This light makes the black bar disappear. This is ideal for off road driving. More visibility when bouncing around.
View attachment 533515


LED Off road Still Test_Lo beam-DD Fog-BO Combo-BO Spot So, this light does not add too much to the visibility range. You will see that it is little more yellow compared to the OSRAM color and it adds a little more brightness in the center area and higher up. In the future I am going to do more testing where I point these outward. I think it would be nice to use these lights to expand the visibility range, since it does not do that much more than the combo light. If I end up doing this, then the lights can only be used off road. If I need brights in a winter storm, the fog and combo lights should work fine. More on this subject after a couple weeks of testing.
View attachment 533516


LED Off road Switches Here you can see the switches are on and stacked in the switch console. It sticks out more than the OEM switched, but the red LEDs are a nice match with the other switches and the orange footwell lighting.
View attachment 533517
Nice work on the led lighting . I don't suppose you are running the LED light bar off the high beam switching? Seems Subaru have ruined any chance of outback night travel by making switching of after market lights an impossible task withtheir canbus system.
 

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Spacers and awning look great!

Installed the smoked tint over the amber turn signals and plasti-dipped the rear badges. The lower rear reflectors didnt get done, I destroyed one of them “learning”. I like the look of the black out for now and I can peel it off if/when I get tired of it. The plasti-dip was a bit tedious but not too bad. Cleaning the badges took the most active time, then it was a lot waiting between coats and the final drying. Afterwards I decided a little more patience and likely another couple coats at sharper angles (I did 6) would have been beneficial. Didn’t apply any glossifier cause I wanted matte. Curious to see how long it holds up.
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2019 Forester Sport CVT
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Discussion Starter #426
I did get the realignment done. Despite not feeling any sterring wheel wobble, the alignment was off a little bit in nboth front and back.

So, I would highly recommend getting a realignment anytime the car is lifted.

534432
 

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2020 Forester Sport
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Just want to say thank you for this beautifully illustrated mod journal.

I was following this post over the past two months while deciding to purchase my 2020 sport.
Now that I have im taking all of your notes into consideration with my additions.

Nervous about horn install and taking the steering wheel off, but super amazing detailed notes! Thank you so much!
 

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2020 Forester Sport
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What would you say is the biggest bang for your buck with sound dampening?

I believe I read earlier you mentioned door is your favorite.
From ease of installation, would you suggest starting from wheel well and then floor boards/doors? Or is engine hood more beneficial?

Also if you are interested in getting rid of your old front tow hook and fog light covers, ill gladly buy them!

Thanks in advance!
 

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2020 Forester 2.5i-S (Touring)
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Nice work on the led lighting . I don't suppose you are running the LED light bar off the high beam switching? Seems Subaru have ruined any chance of outback night travel by making switching of after market lights an impossible task withtheir canbus system.
Apparently this works, there are a few posts on this forum if you do a search

 

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2019 Forester Sport CVT
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538 Posts
Discussion Starter #430
Just want to say thank you for this beautifully illustrated mod journal.

I was following this post over the past two months while deciding to purchase my 2020 sport.
Now that I have im taking all of your notes into consideration with my additions.

Nervous about horn install and taking the steering wheel off, but super amazing detailed notes! Thank you so much!
You're welcome! Congrats on the new car.

Horn is not too bad if you go with a simple mount. I went big on that one and had to do some fabrication. Steering wheel removal is a breeze, just make sure you mark the spline position to reinstall in the right spot and leave the nut on with three turns so when you pull the wheel you won't get a black eye.
 

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2019 Forester Sport CVT
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538 Posts
Discussion Starter #431
What would you say is the biggest bang for your buck with sound dampening?

I believe I read earlier you mentioned door is your favorite.
From ease of installation, would you suggest starting from wheel well and then floor boards/doors? Or is engine hood more beneficial?

Also if you are interested in getting rid of your old front tow hook and fog light covers, ill gladly buy them!

Thanks in advance!
You don't get much improvement with hood and fenders. So, keep that in mind. The doors, floor and roof give the best performance.

Here is my recommended short-list of preferences for audio (first priority) and road noise (second priority)
Front Doors
Rear Doors
Floor boards
Cargo area with fenders
Roof
Hood
Rear Gate
Front fenders

With that said, from an ease of install I would list it as this:
Hood
Front Fenders
Cargo area with rear fenders
Rear Gate
Front Doors
Rear Doors
Roof
Floor boards - hardest for sure and requires the most material and time. But, it pays off in performance.
 
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