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2001 Forester S auto
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250 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Pardon my ignorance , since maybe this is a no-brainer Q, but I'm getting conflicting answers on when to change my timing belt. I did it last at 114,5XX, shortly after I got it in 2013. Some folks saying 60,000 miles, others are fearmongering at 40,000 miles. What's the common sense answer here for the 1st series SOHC EJ25? Thanks guys.
 

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2017 Touring CVT
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124 Posts
While the safest route is of course to follow mfr. recoms for timing belt replacement, especially with an interference engine, I can't help but think of my last (and hopefully final) belt change in an Outback. I had the change done at 103k mi and asked that I be given the removed belt, which I examined closely for wear. There was literally none apparent--the belt was supple, there were no cracks between any of the projections when I twisted it and the mfr. logo was still clean and completely legible. Those belts are tough, but I'm still glad I now have a chain.
 

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2000 SF5 Automatic
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446 Posts
The belt usually outlasts the idlers, water pump and tensioner.
When one of these seize up, the belt shreds and / or jumps teeth leading to a catastrophe.

Sent from my SM-J700F using Tapatalk
 

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2012 Forester X Auto
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1,901 Posts
@SueBrew -
Like @bobk25 said, the other components are as or more important than the belt itself.
Provided everything riding on the belt is changed out at the service interval, there is no reason to do unnecessary maintenance.
60K or 40K for that replacement is ridiculous and unnecessary.
 

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Administrator
2018 2.5i Premium CVT
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18,752 Posts
The spec in Europe is in the 50-60k mile range. My suspicion is that Subaru got the metric conversion messed up and is too embarrassed to admit it. We have encountered very, very few reports here of failure during the first 105k miles. But in cases where only the belt was replaced at that point, the failure count does go up as a consequence of subsequent failure of a rotating part.
 
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