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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone owned a post 2000 turbo suub of any model and done more than 200,000 km?Was it expensive to maintain and how is it now (or when you sold it)?
 

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Sydney Dinner Organiser
MY05 XT luxury
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If you are interested in the XT then the first model was the MY04 which I think came out about August 2003. So they at most less than 3 years old, so that would be a bloody lot of kms in that time.

You could look at WRX and GT owners, but thats a different engine to the XT. The WRX has the same turbo and I think you should be able to find someone who has an original one with that sort of mileage, but probably not on these forums.

Are you worried about reliability of the turbo and/or engine?
 

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German tech
MY16 Audi S3 Sedan DSG 6 speed
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I think I asked the same question on the old site whilst waiting for my Fozza

:cool:

The latest XT's have a pedigree now and if driven sensibly should last just as well as any car (from what I've read).

Of course they may have higher maintenance costs down the road but no one buys an XT not expecting that. The chiropractic shove in the small of your back wipes away any concerns about service costs :drool:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
dicknose said:
Are you worried about reliability of the turbo and/or engine?
Not worried , just curious as I intend(at least at this stage) to keep the XT for at least 5years.Probably should have said 100,000km in my original post.
Maximus
 

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Sydney Dinner Organiser
MY05 XT luxury
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I wouldnt expect any problems.
Obviously things can and at times do go wrong, but its not like they are crappy cars that are prone to fall apart.

The turbo should be ok for that time. Obviously you will go through consumables like brake pads, cam belts etc
Also likely are things like shocks.
 

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Maximus said:
Not worried , just curious as I intend(at least at this stage) to keep the XT for at least 5years.Probably should have said 100,000km in my original post.
Maximus
My MY04 is still going strong and it has ~80k km on it now. It had a reasonably hard early life, although you wouldn't have known it. As far as I know, not a single thing has gone wrong with it other than some minor trouble with the cruise control (not while I had it).

Simon
 

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Discussion Starter #7
SD1976 said:
My MY04 is still going strong and it has ~80k km on it now. It had a reasonably hard early life, although you wouldn't have known it. As far as I know, not a single thing has gone wrong with it other than some minor trouble with the cruise control (not while I had it).

Simon
That's good news as I was mainly concerned with engine wear given the turbo and the need for spirited driving in the XT.
Maximus
 

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Maximus said:
That's good news as I was mainly concerned with engine wear given the turbo and the need for spirited driving in the XT.
Maximus
Trust me, that one was 'spirited' along. It also spent ~6000km on some nasty forestry roads whilst I had it, which I thought might have caused some problems, but no.

Things I can suggest for longevity IMO, check oil regularly (~1000kms), service every 6000km (if only oil change) and don't pamper it.

Simon
 

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2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio
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I don't have any experience with the FXT (since delivery is still about 10 days away :sad:) but I've owned an Lancia Delta integrale for about 6 years.

It was constantly driven "enthusiastically". It had 210.000 km (app 130.000 miles) on the clock when I parted with it.

The engine was very tough, and I don't think there is any reason to believe that the FXT is of lower build quality than the integrale engine (which is basically a 1960's design/construction).

The running costs of the integrale were extreme, but that was due to the scarcity of parts (many parts had to be hand made, e.g. the ECU which I burned - twice!).

I think the key is to service the engine properly, not to "gun" the engine when cold and allow the turbo to cool down after enthusiastic driving.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
integrale said:
I
I think the key is to service the engine properly, not to "gun" the engine when cold and allow the turbo to cool down after enthusiastic driving.
Sounds like good advice.The turbo cool down is the only one I'll need to get used to.
Maximus
 

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German tech
MY16 Audi S3 Sedan DSG 6 speed
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The MY06 XT turbo cooldown is not necessary (unless you are really fanging it ie track days)

The XT has active and passive cooling for the turbo.

All you need to do is drive slowly when you put it in the garage.

The days of turbo timers are over in new turbo's.:drool:

Edit - I do agree though that you wait for the operating temp to come up before "going for it". This is the same with any internal combustion engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Didn't know that Candy.Thanks for the tip-one less thing to remember.
Maximus
 
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Yep - unless you are basically doing a track day there shouldn't be any need to "cool" the turbo down in an XT. There was a sticker in my MY99 WRX which said that it should be cooled down after some hard driving before switching off but that is not the case with the XT. Also, doing 110 - 120 down the expressway isn't really giving it a hard time... When I was newly into turbo cars I did think that was the case... :shock:

It is important however to make sure the oil is at proper levels and I think it is generally accepted to change it every 3 months / 6000 kms in a turbo car - even though the "handbook" only calls for changes at around twice that. Cheap insurance to keep the engine / turbo in top condition.

Regards
Ron...
 

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Re: cooling down

I fully agree with the points made above by Candy and harbour2929 - a cool-down period was only needed when I worked the turbo quite hard. Driving at 100 mph at constant speed does not activate the turbo and therefore, you don't need a cool-down period (driving at 160 mph [edit: that would require a free-fall even in the integrale] at constant speed would, however since that would require "pedal-to-the-metal" in the integrale).

I also agree that the best way to cool things down is to take it easy the last couple of miles before you arrive at your destination.

Have fun!
 

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German tech
MY16 Audi S3 Sedan DSG 6 speed
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Where do you drive at 100mph legally except on the track ?

My cool down (and supported by the local Service Manager) is the few meters into my garage (unless, again you are track racing)

However, I am in a 50 kph area so I am hardly racing it for at least a mile prior to turning off the car
 

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Of course I don't :redface:

It was a comment on you're constant-speed remark (which I fully agree with).
 

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German tech
MY16 Audi S3 Sedan DSG 6 speed
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Hope my turbo lasts at least 100,000 km and then someone else can deal with the issues
 

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MY16 Audi S3 Sedan DSG 6 speed
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integrale said:
Of course I don't :redface:

It was a comment on you're constant-speed remark (which I fully agree with).
He has already admitted he doesn't drive that way Max .... :roll:

Most of Scandinavia is under 120 kph
 

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On some (long) stretches of the German Autobahn there is not penalised speed limit, only a recommended max speed.

I seem to remember an early episode of Top Gear taking the Maclaren F1 to the Autobahn testing top speed and I think Thomas Bscher used his F1 to commute at close to 200 mph between Frankfurt and his home (in Köln, I think).
 
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