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I read an article in "The End Wrench" Subaru's Repair Tech's Mag. Entitled "What Antifreeze Should I use?" In it they said that they only recommend Subaru's Antifreeze P/N SOA868V9210, because of some of it's chemical properties that effect corrosion.

Does anybody have any experience here? I bought a gallon at the dealer and the parts clerk tried to talk me out of it because it was $19.95, but he said that he would give me a discount to $14.96, because he thought it was overpriced. I kinda agree, but there seems to be no equivelent.

Finally. How do you get all the Coolant out of the engine? The owners manual says that it chould take 7.2 Qts AT and 7.3 qts MT, but I only got about 4 qts out when I opened the draincock at the bottom of the radiator, so I only replaced the part that drained out. I didn't see a vacuum breaker screw on the engine at the top or the system.:confused:
 

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#8 Post ho
1999 Subaru Forester
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2,441 Posts
About using subaru "genuine" coolant.. usually if you use a different brand, it will void your warranty
 

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The convert formely known as Lexusfreak
2003 XS
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3,970 Posts
The Subi dealer is doing mine next week.....I'm sticking with the Subi coolant & related coolant conditioner......the price for the whole thing is $59.95 (Canadian, including labour).

I am thinking about using Redline Water wetter (half bottle) once the coolant flush is done too. :cool:
 

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Subaru Coolant

I paid something like $14.95 for a gallon of Subaru brand coolant. I does seem expensive, but in view of the price of the car itself, it's cheap. I figure that it would be foolish for me to save $8 and face even a small risk using the common stuff.
 

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The convert formely known as Lexusfreak
2003 XS
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3,970 Posts
Fitz Ingarage said:
I paid something like $14.95 for a gallon of Subaru brand coolant. I does seem expensive, but in view of the price of the car itself, it's cheap. I figure that it would be foolish for me to save $8 and face even a small risk using the common stuff.
Agreed! :cool:
 

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2015 Forester XT Touring CVT
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well if subaru coolant is the same stuff as the nissan stuff which i am not sure of(i know they both have the same parent company). the nissan stuff is supposed to be the best stuff around. in my area i hear american muscle car guys bragging on how good the nissan stuff is
 

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The convert formely known as Lexusfreak
2003 XS
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3,970 Posts
sschmelcke said:
well if subaru coolant is the same stuff as the nissan stuff which i am not sure of(i know they both have the same parent company). the nissan stuff is supposed to be the best stuff around. in my area i hear american muscle car guys bragging on how good the nissan stuff is
They are not the same colour, & to be honest the Nissan stuff isn't anything to write home about......my old 2001 Maxima can atest to that lol. :)
 

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2017 Outback 3.6R Limited High Torque CVT
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We also suggest that you use the Subaru Coolant. Subaru says that we must use it here at the dealership in all service vehicles.

Coolant - $13.50
Conditioner - $1.39

Thanks,
Jackie
Annapolis Subaru
443-837-1422
 

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The convert formely known as Lexusfreak
2003 XS
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3,970 Posts
SubaruPartsGirl said:
We also suggest that you use the Subaru Coolant. Subaru says that we must use it here at the dealership in all service vehicles.

Coolant - $13.50
Conditioner - $1.39
Did both at my local Subi dealer today for my wife 03 FXS. :)
 

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The Modfather
2019 Impreza 5dr Sport - Manual
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There are few things I'd rather have the dealer do, and changing the coolant is one of them. It's messy and if done wrong, with all the head gasket issues, can be a big deal. If you do want to do it yourself, I'd suggest getting the OEM coolant. After Subaru released the CoolantTSB I think it will be less of an issue down the road if you ever have problems.

TSB here:

http://www.scoobymods.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5316
 

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2017 Outback 3.6R Limited High Torque CVT
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I would have to agree! I am not scared about doing much myself but coolant is one thing that I have never done before. I've watched alot of techs do it but it seems to me that there is a pretty good chance of screwing it up and getting air bubbles, spills, etc.

Jackie
 
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There's nothing magical about antifreezes. I flushed my system and changed the coolant in mine myself last summer. As I remember, my owner's manual said to use ethelene glycol, which is the traditional green-colored antifreeze that used to be used in most vehicles. The old (stock) coolant was green, indicating that it was an ethylene glycol antifreeze. So I used ethylene glycol antifreeze. This is one of the three main types of antifreeze used in vehicles today. The other two are Dexcool and what's generically called G-05. All Ford Motor Co. and Daimler-Chrysler vehicles have come stock for years now with G-05. A few manufacturers in Europe and Asia use a different, brand-specific, type. The opinion of most experts is that G-05 is the best, all things considered, and that more and more manufacturers are moving to it or are going to switch to it. The difference in the types of antifreezes is their chemical makeup. It is the opinion of most experts that any of the three types can be used in any vehicle, provided that if you change to a different type you must flush ALL of the other type of antifreeze out of the engine block and radiator. The experts generally claim that statements by some manufacturers and others that the material that such things as their seals and gaskets are made of requires their recommended type, are not true.

It is not recommended that you use the "universal", "mixes with and replaces any color", and "can be used in any vehicle" antifreezes now sold and being pushed by Prestone and many other antifreeze makers.

As far as I know, there's two basic ways to do your own coolant system flush and antifreeze change.

A backflush kit from an auto parts store is one way. You put a T-shaped tube in a heater hose. You cut the hose and insert two ends of the tube. Then you hook a garden hose to the third end in the tube, take off the radiator cap, and turn the hose on. The hose water flushes out the system, out through the top of the radiator. When you're done you put a cap on the end of the tube that you hooked the hose to and leave the tube in place for later flushes.

As I see it, there's a problem with the backflush kit method. You use water from your garden hose. After flushing is completed, water from the hose is left in the engine part of the cooling system. Its best to use distilled water in your cooling system, because unlike water from the hose, it has no minerals in it that can cause problems. Yes, the problems are usually slight, and you CAN use hose water, but distilled water is better. When you fill the radiator so that half of what's in the whole system (engine and radiator combined) is antifreeze, you can use distilled water if you still need to add water, but you still have the water from the hose in the engine part of the system. For this reason, I don't backflush.

I use the second popular method. I drain the radiator, fill it with distilled water, run the engine until the temp gauge has gone up enough to open the thermostat and mix the distilled water that I added with what's in the system, turn the engine off, and wait 10-20 minutes. Then I do that again. Drain the radiator, top off with distilled water, run the engine till its hot and everything's mixed up, turn it off, and wait 10-20 minutes. Since in a typical vehicle, about half of the liquid in the whole system is in the radiator, each time you do this you drain about half of what's in the system. If you do this 5 times, after the 5th drain only about 3.125% of what was in the system (water plus antifreeze) when you started is left. This is negligible, and the system is flushed. You will see that after five cycles the liquid draining out of the radiator is clear, indicating that the flush is complete and there's little or none of the water or antifreeze that was in the system when you started left in the system. Then you can put in 50% antifreeze and, if necessary, top off with distilled water. Be sure to turn your heater on hot each time you do a cycle, so that the coolant goes through the heater hoses.

To determine how much antifreeze you need to reach a 50-50 mixture, simply consult the Owner's Manual for the engine coolant system capacity and put half of that amount of antifreeze in the radiator.
 

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BLUE WASABI, (#2 Info Provider)
2008 SG Model D
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Lexusfreak said:
I am thinking about using Redline Water wetter (half bottle) once the coolant flush is done too. :cool:
NOTE: DO NOT use "redline water wetter" in cold climates (this means Canada)...it is made for hot climates and for race purposes.

I will find the exact info on what happens to the engine block when used in cold climates.
 

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The convert formely known as Lexusfreak
2003 XS
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sirwilliam said:
NOTE: DO NOT use "redline water wetter" in cold climates (this means Canada)...it is made for hot climates and for race purposes.

I will find the exact info on what happens to the engine block when used in cold climates.
Haven't purchased anything yet sirwilliam......glad I didn't......awaiting your feedback & details. :???: :think: Not even a half bottle huh? :shock:

Thanks for your comments jmac :) I took the car to the Subi dealer for the coolant flush.....I assume they did the complete system flush.

one more question to the American owners.......Can I purchase single quart bottles of Subaru coolant at the U.S. dealers parts departments instead of the 1 gallon jugs for future 'top ups'? :confused: The dealers in Toronto only carry the 1 gallon jugs which is too much for what I will need. Please advise & many thanks again to all! :D
 

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'09 STI
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Fitz Ingarage said:
I paid something like $14.95 for a gallon of Subaru brand coolant. I does seem expensive, but in view of the price of the car itself, it's cheap. I figure that it would be foolish for me to save $8 and face even a small risk using the common stuff.
+1. This is a few bucks difference once every two or three years.:confused:
 

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I do the 2nd method that jmacmaster described. I cannot imagine leaving this up to the bozos at the dealership! I am certain that I will do a better job than them, as there is no way that they will take the time to fully drain all the old stuff out of there, they cannot afford it.
 

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2018 2.5i Premium CVT
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I recall hearing a while ago that it wasn't good to immediately refill a hot engine with cold water. Risk of deforming, cracking, etc. Like immersing a hot piece of glassware in cold water.

Anybody have real insight into this?

When I've changed coolant this way in the past I've spaced it out over pretty much the entire day to let the engine cool down between fillings.
 

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Lexusfreak said:
They are not the same colour, & to be honest the Nissan stuff isn't anything to write home about......my old 2001 Maxima can atest to that lol. :)

i also had a maxima although it was a 97 i had no problems ever with coolant/radiator. thats just what i was told by someone that it is a very good coolant
 
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I got one one thing to say
if you want to buy the cheap antifreeze buy a cheep car...
 

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The convert formely known as Lexusfreak
2003 XS
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MountainBiker said:
I do the 2nd method that jmacmaster described. I cannot imagine leaving this up to the bozos at the dealership! I am certain that I will do a better job than them, as there is no way that they will take the time to fully drain all the old stuff out of there, they cannot afford it.
Our dealership did just fine with ours. ;)
 
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