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2001 S Turbo
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just took the car into kwik-fat for a puncture repair.

They had a look and said because the puncture is so close the the tyre wall, it cannot be repaired.
Is this correct as they mentioned I could get a quote for a new tyre. haha

Should I try my local garage?

cheers
ubdai
 

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Mad Englishman.
MY06 Forester STi 6MT
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4,157 Posts
Just took the car into kwik-fat for a puncture repair.

They had a look and said because the puncture is so close the the tyre wall, it cannot be repaired.
Is this correct as they mentioned I could get a quote for a new tyre. haha

Should I try my local garage?

cheers
ubdai
you could try somewhere else for a second opinon but yeah that's right about the too close to the tyre wall thing. Matter of opinion on what's "too close" though.
 

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99 UK S-turbo
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Indeed, some places say too close at less than 1/2", some at less than an inch and some are happy to repair as long as its through the tread even if its really close.

Simon
 

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2016 & 2018 2.5i Premium CVT
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And you might need to replace all four, depending on how far down the surviving three might be. It's an AWD thing.
 

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2000 S-Turbo Manual
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118 Posts
Tyres must be repaired by someone qualified, and to British Standard BS AU 159f (at least in the UK!).

Basically a puncture in the central 75% of the tread should be repairable - outwith this it is not.
 
G

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And you might need to replace all four, depending on how far down the surviving three might be. It's an AWD thing.
Has anyone ever suffered the supposed & fabled diff damage from old an new tyres being mixed?
My brother was running his car round with a 4.1 rear diff in his car for 2 years, after complaining about jerking under acceleration the diff was checked and found that a 4.44 should have been fitted.
A 4.44 was then fitted and car drives faultlessly..
 

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99 UK S-turbo
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I very much doubt it, I ran 225/55's one end and 215/60's the other for 6 months with no issues, I ran my Ford 4x4 (18kgm centre diff) on wormn and news with no problem for 13 years.

Simon
 

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JDM Foz [sold]
2016 Mercedes E220 AMG Auto
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ahem!

http://www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/f75/tyres-swap-front-rear-60255/?highlight=tyres

4 months on my diff is still in one piece and making NO funny noises.

Some local garages might take the pucture rule to the letter where as kwik crap will take an interpretation of the rule and err on the safe side and try to sell you a new tyre. If I remember rightly (which is usually wrong these days) its 1 inch from the edge of the tyre. Or is it 1cm?
 

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2001 S Turbo
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

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2004 XT AT
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1,101 Posts
I very much doubt it, I ran 225/55's one end and 215/60's the other for 6 months with no issues, I ran my Ford 4x4 (18kgm centre diff) on wormn and news with no problem for 13 years.
Add me to the list of sceptics... the SoA figure of 1/4 inch circumference is about 0.3%. Suspect tyres are made to lower tolerence than that in the first place. Anyway, if Subarus were so easy to break by normal everyday neglect they surely wouldn't have such a reputation of toughness and longevity... wonder how many owners actually rotate their tyres??

Plus the SoA site shows recommended procedure of a man trying to measure a tyre's circumference by wrapping a steel tape measure round it, which is quite error prone (kinks etc) - likely giving rise to worse errors than the 0.3% he's trying to look for...

If anyone has seen an FHI document or other non-SoA source of the famous 1/4 inch guidance I'd be interested to see it.

-- Steve
 

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1997 S/TB
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I very much doubt it, I ran 225/55's one end and 215/60's the other for 6 months with no issues, I ran my Ford 4x4 (18kgm centre diff) on wormn and news with no problem for 13 years.

Simon
Isn't this true simply because the centre diff is a diff and thus allows different speeds f/r? Or is the question over the fact it's a viscous coupling rather than a true diff therefore constant different speeds would heat up and cause damage to the oil in the diff?
 

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99 UK S-turbo
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The alledged issue is wioth the centre VC.

It will heat up due to constant slip, whether it will heat enough to either
1/ Go into 'hump' where it locks solid which can cause mechanical damage (including permanent locking)
2/ Heat enough to cause a silicon fluid leak - note the allegation that the fluid is somehow damaged by heat is a total fallacy propogated by those who seek to explain a failure without understanding the system)

is very debatable!

Simon
 

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Its a conventional diff with a VC LSD element, its not like, for example, freelander I which had no centre diff, just a VC to transfer torque to the rear.

Simon
 
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