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2010 Forester
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Discussion Starter #1
My MY10 lacks the height of my former SUVs interior (Grand Cherokee) and was too low to haul my tall frame road bike (seat and post removed).

After experimenting and tinkering I found that the rear seat backs can be removed as they are only fastened by two bolts per side and a hinge that slides apart easily. So, for the cycle season I have a 3-passenger Forester and can haul my bike full time if I choose to. My full carpet cover made of Home Depot cheap carpet helps as well. Can reassemble in less than 10 min if necessary.

Pic attached.
 

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2010 Forester
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619 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Why don't you just turn the bike on it's side?
That would be OK for an occasional short drive, but when on it's side it shifts around quite a bit, there is no room for a second bike (girlfriend's) and there is a need for luggage space for both of us several times per year. I tried it last weekend and it was really messy and took 20 min to get just the bikes and gear in there whthout having rubbing or rattling metal parts. Really like to keep them inside for security and weather reasons.

Bob
 

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2009 Forester XT 4EAT
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2,265 Posts
Call me crazy if you must, but why not use a hitch mounter bike hauler or a roof mounter bike carrier? Then you could carry up to four at a time and not have to worry about laying bikes down, removing seats, etc..
 

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2009 Forester XT Limited
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1,525 Posts
Bob, Glad to see that you got the issue resolved. :rock:
 

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2009 Forester 2.5x
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Cleverly done, I must say. Still, why not a bike carrier on the roof rack? Bikes are out of the way and plenty of room (and seating) inside.
Steve
09 2.5X AT
 

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2014 Forester 2.5i CVT
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Maybe you don't need to remove the seat

Have you tried doing it the other way around? With the fork mounted to the back of the rear seat (a Yakima Blockhead might work well here) and the rear tire of the bike in the pit for the spare tire, there should be plenty of room. Then you can leave the seat in all the time. Just remove the deck from the cargo area and move the tire out of its normal place. Bungie cording the tire to the side where the hooks for the "side cargo net" are should work. Or get AAA and leave the spare tire at home :icon_biggrin:
 

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2010 Forester
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Discussion Starter #13
Have you tried doing it the other way around? With the fork mounted to the back of the rear seat (a Yakima Blockhead might work well here) and the rear tire of the bike in the pit for the spare tire, there should be plenty of room. Then you can leave the seat in all the time. Just remove the deck from the cargo area and move the tire out of its normal place. Bungie cording the tire to the side where the hooks for the "side cargo net" are should work. Or get AAA and leave the spare tire at home :icon_biggrin:
This is a tall roadbike frame. The height of the compartment is tallest at the rear. The length with the seat up would not be adequate either. I'd really like to use a forkmount device like is shown a few posts above, but I cannot afford ANY extra height or I'll never fit it in. The fork is rough on my carpet cover, but it's only worth $20 and can be replaced each 2-3 yrs.
 

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This is very interesting. Thanks for sharing. I'm looking to do a similar deal where I keep my bike inside.
Pros to keeping inside:
1. better gas milage. But not really if bike is on the back tow hitch.
2. Theft prevention
3. less elemental damage (rain/sun/dust).
4. less foot print if left inside when compared to the bike being stored on the back. More important in cities.
Really not that big of a deal if bike is top side if in the woods, but could prevent you from getting into parking garages and such.

Hell, with your set up, there's room to lay down beside your bike and rest.

I have a Giant Mountain Bike. Medium. Roam 3 (2013) - Bikes | Giant Bicycles | United States

I would like to do your set up, but with a 2nd generation Forester.
2003-2005: 64.1 cubic feet with seats down (X model)
2006-2008: 57.7 cubic feet with seats down (X model)

Your 2010 has 68.3 cubic feet with seats down. I doubt I'll be able to pull it off. Worst case scenerio I get a smaller bike.

Does anyone know why the cubic feet changes with the 2nd generation?
_____

Live Free or Die.
 

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2010 Forester
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Discussion Starter #16
Dimensions and configuration are more important than cu ft. Sometimes the only way to figure it out is to try it. I had no idea that the seatbacks were so easy to take off. That helped a lot. Of course you could always take the seat bench section out as well. Would open up massive dimensions. And then you wouldn't have to haul people around, like a Lambo owner!!!
 

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Dimensions and configuration are more important than cu ft. Sometimes the only way to figure it out is to try it. I had no idea that the seatbacks were so easy to take off. That helped a lot. Of course you could always take the seat bench section out as well. Would open up massive dimensions. And then you wouldn't have to haul people around, like a Lambo owner!!!
Indeed! This would be significant gains.

Most likely would not be that hard of a thing to do. As long as you can put them back for resale value... just in case.

___

Live Free or Die
 
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