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2017 Forester 2.5 Premium CVT
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For the second time within a few months, I have a damaged tire on my 2017 Forester. The first time, I wrote it off as a fluke. A sharp pebble had pierced the threads like a dagger, leading to a flat. Although even then, I was not amused because come on, a pebble??? I had to replace the entire tire, which had maybe 2,000 miles on it, to the tune of $250 including labor at my dealership (Who charges labor for installing a newly purchased tire, by the way?)

The other day, again a damaged tire. This time a small cut causing a slow leak.

I'm done with these tires. Called the dealership this morning to ask whether they see issues with the OEM tires frequently, or whether I have extraordinarily bad luck. It was difficult to get a response that was an actual response out of the service advisor, because he kept replying with "brochure speak" and marketing gobble-di-****. In the end, he said it was just me and bad luck.

I don't buy it. I have driven a Jeep Cherokee through the most unforgiving terrain, such as 4WD tracks in Baja California and lava fields in Northern Mexico and never had a flat in 10 years.

On my brand-new Subaru driven only in town, I've had two flats within months. You can't tell me that's coincidence.

If they can't fix the tire this time around, either, I'm not going to replace it with the same tire but get rid of all four and buy something that holds up.

Does anyone know if I can get the same BF Goodrich AT truck tires that are on my Jeep for the Forester?
 

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Im sure you can find the size of tire for bf.

I gota say, the first 2 weeks of driving my wifes 2016 impreza, the wheel had a slice on the side wall, not deep enough, but enough to expose the mesh. Dealer didnt do anything about it, didnt cause a flat or anything. Im sure eventually itll bulge and will need to be replaced. I havent had that ever happen to any of my other tires. Though its not subarus problem, it woul dbe the manufacture of the tires.
 

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2017 Forester 2.5 Premium CVT
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, it IS Subaru's problem, because their choice of manufacturers does reflect on Subaru's overall quality and reputation. If Apple sold iPhones with parts that were prone to frequent failure, they'd be hurting their reputation and trust that consumers put into them. Apple couldn't simply point to the manufacturer providing those parts and say, "That's their problem, not ours." Hope that makes sense.
 

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2018 Crosstrek
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It could be just bad luck. It happens. Still, OEM tires are often less than we would like. Your fondness for driving unforgiving terrain [I'm envious] suggests something tougher than an ordinary passenger car tire. I'd look at an all terrain tire.
 

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Casper reincarnated
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General feeling here is that it's sure nice when you get to the point where you can get rid of the OEM Geos and move on to something good.
Not only here BB, it's across all Subaru Forums from what I've read.
People still the buy the vehicle brand without a thought for the tires though, until it's too late, or you pay for new ones yourself. :catfight:
 

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2015 Forester2.5i Premium CVT
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We've owned six brand new cars going back to 1980 -- two Toyotas, two Mazdas, a Datsun (pre-Nissan branding), and this Subaru. It was the consensus of the owners of all of them that the OEM tires sucked. It seems like everyone always thinks OEM tires are crap on every car on the market.

Personally, while I found I was able to improve on them when replacement time came (often substantially), none of them were really that bad. They all lasted three or four years, 30-40k miles. They were the tires the car was test-driven on, that the car was reviewed by the magazines on, tested by Consumer Reports on, and as long as they continued to provide the performance we accepted when we chose the car, I didn't see a basis for complaint. None have seemed any more or less susceptible to damage than their replacements, and that's driving in Philadelphia where the streets are broken and full of pointy things.

Our Foz's Geolandars are now 4 years old with 30k miles, and we have had no issues. One caught a nail and leaked, but was easily repaired by the dealer. They still have enough tread that we plan a 2000 mile road trip at the end of the month, after which I will start looking for a sale on Michelin Defenders, a tire I've had good luck with in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the replies! The damage was caused by a screw, and the tire guy also chalked it up to bad luck. He said he got ten more vehicles in for tire damage that day. He thought it's because of all the construction around town. The streets are littered with foreign objects, and each time it rains, Tucson's streets flood and stuff gets washed into the roadways. Incidentally, both my flats occurred during days of heavy rain.

Still, I won't replace these tires with the same brand and model when the time comes. I already asked the tire dealer whether the tires I've had on my Cherokee are available for the Subie, and they are. He said they'd be a perfect complement for that kind of vehicle, so I think it'll be a no-brainer to go for those when the time comes.

In case anyone cares, they are BF Goodrich KO AT tires. I've been highly impressed with them.
 

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2014 2.5i Limited CVT
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I did not like the stock Geolander tires on my 14 Forester Limited. I found they were not great and were badly worn at under 20K miles. As another Desert Dweller (a few hours west of our poster), I drive on a lot of really hot streets for a few months of the year.. I did a few minor "off-road" excursions - more on unpaved roads than on dirt tracks... I found that the Geolander tires more easily lost grip in the wet from our occasional rain.

When I replaced the stock Yokohama, I went with a Nexen all season (N5000 Plus) and find they are a good replacement but still not something I've gone seriously off-road with. They do better on the wet, feel just as solid on the dry and seem to have some decent grip on minor dirt roads.

Next year, I'll probably be looking at the Continental Terrain Contact AT (direct size swap) or another in a close to optimal size.

I've been having less-than-great luck with our stock tire size (225/60/17)

I had bad luck with some BGF Radial T/A on my old Mazda 3 - a sporty tire on a sporty car and showed a lot of wear after only 15K miles.
 

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2003 EJ20K Forester
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I agree with the rest, on the vast majority of cars, OEM tires suck for anything other than grocery getting. I had the pleasure of driving a 300km trip on a northern gravel road (crushed shale) in a brand new F150. I popped 3 tires on that trip. Bought some real 10 ply tires, and no more issues. The Jeep is a rare bird because it can actually back up its marketing - it is a vehicle actually designed for off-road. The Forester is sold as a grocery getter.
 

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2014 Forester XT CVT w/ S & S#
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Replaced the Bridgestone duelers on the 2014 XT after about 25,000 miles when they were getting skittish and wet weather. Put on Michelin premier A/S.
Those tires went away when the car was totaled. The 17XT will probably get the same Michelins in the Spring after the Winter tires (WS 80s) come off.

Bad luck does happen, I flattened two tires on a Porsche (at the same time) that had less than 100 miles on them ... That was an expensive drive through a parking lot!
 

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2015 Forester 2.5i CVT
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It could be just bad luck. It happens. Still, OEM tires are often less than we would like. Your fondness for driving unforgiving terrain [I'm envious] suggests something tougher than an ordinary passenger car tire. I'd look at an all terrain tire.
X2, Jeep probably also comes with LT "truck tire" rated tires, Foresters are cars and come with lighter duty tires even if they are all season, MT rated etc., therefore they get flats easier. Back in my rock crawling days I bought a nice commercial grade tire plug kit and have carried and used it in both our Foresters. A good quality bicycle pump is always in my car too. This will get you out of lots of problems with flats but tires sometimes still need replaced when you get back to civilization and sometimes not.

General feeling here is that it's sure nice when you get to the point where you can get rid of the OEM Geos and move on to something good.
Yes, the Yokohamas and Bridgestones that came on our Foresters are just ok tires, rated at 50k miles. They grip ok, they wear out fast when driven hard, and are mid-range tires nothing more. Michelins that I replaced the first set with cost more, but they handle, ride and grip so much better. They cost more, but are worth it, also I never buy tires at the dealer, never as good a deal or warranty/repairs if you need it.
 

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2011 Forester 2.5X Automatic
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For the second time within a few months, I have a damaged tire on my 2017 Forester. The first time, I wrote it off as a fluke. A sharp pebble had pierced the threads like a dagger, leading to a flat. Although even then, I was not amused because come on, a pebble??? I had to replace the entire tire, which had maybe 2,000 miles on it, to the tune of $250 including labor at my dealership (Who charges labor for installing a newly purchased tire, by the way?)

The other day, again a damaged tire. This time a small cut causing a slow leak.

I'm done with these tires. Called the dealership this morning to ask whether they see issues with the OEM tires frequently, or whether I have extraordinarily bad luck. It was difficult to get a response that was an actual response out of the service advisor, because he kept replying with "brochure speak" and marketing gobble-di-****. In the end, he said it was just me and bad luck.

I don't buy it. I have driven a Jeep Cherokee through the most unforgiving terrain, such as 4WD tracks in Baja California and lava fields in Northern Mexico and never had a flat in 10 years.

On my brand-new Subaru driven only in town, I've had two flats within months. You can't tell me that's coincidence.

If they can't fix the tire this time around, either, I'm not going to replace it with the same tire but get rid of all four and buy something that holds up.

Does anyone know if I can get the same BF Goodrich AT truck tires that are on my Jeep for the Forester?
Hate to say it but you said it first; it's just bad luck. I never get a flat ...whether with my '98 GMC pickup or my '11 Foz. My wife gets them all the time. She has the Accord with OEM Dunlaps; I have the Forester with a new set of OEM Geolandar's. I've had *zero* issues with the Geo's and like them for my driving needs.

Here's what you need to do; get away from the dealership in handling your tire issues. Some of the national chain tire stores will, if you go into the shop and pay the cost, set you up with a road hazard warranty on your current set of tires. Go in and have them rotate and balance the tires, expect to pay for the service (but they may waive it if you buy the warranties) and ask about any road hazard warranty they offer. Providing your tires are in good condition they may offer you the warranty.These programs are a great way to mitigate the cost of replacing the tire if it gets a puncture in the sidewall region ...which includes the tread about 3/4 to an inch from the edge of the tire. No shop will repair a sidewall puncture; the tire is condemned and you have to buy a new tire. The warranty allows for a pro rata discount on the cost of a new tire based on the remaining tread on the old tire. In addition you will get free flat repairs ...which is a patch job requiring the un-mounting, re-mounting and balancing of the tire in addtion to the patch ...a procedure that probably runs about $75-100 or so. Periodic rotation and balancing is also included. In short it's a good deal. If you do a new set of AT-style tires score them at a local national chain tire shop and *get the road hazard warranty*. Who charges labor to repair a tire or mount a new tire? Every shop out there will charge you labor to repair your tire or mount and balance a new tire ...labor includes unmounting, mounting and balancing. You really think you get that free? Don't mean to pop your bubble but mounting and balancing is not included in the price of a tire.
 

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2015 Forester 2.5 Touring
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I have had the same experience with the OEM Bridgestones. Prior to buying my Forester I can't remember when the last time I had to repair a tire and I have owned three cars for several years. Then I bought my forester, 3 tire repairs in 6 months picking up objects like screws and in one case a 7 inch aluminum rod. It doesn't help that Tucson has some of the worst roads in the Country. In any case even though I had plenty of tread left on the OEMs I had had enough. I went to Discount Tire and bought a set of Yokohama YK 740 GTX. The YK 740 is exclusive to Discount. Went in for the Michelin Premiers, but after talking to the manager, was convinced that the YK 740s were a better fit for the roads and conditions here in Tucson. Haven't owned Yokos in a long time, but so far I have been impressed with them. Oh and one other thing, I don't have confidence in the Dealer in Tucson. I bought my Forester as certified with 12000 miles on it. I was assured that their inspection process was very rigorous. After taking possession of the car, I had several issues with it like one of the rear hatch struts was very loose and made a loud noise when I opened or closed the hatch. There were several other issues I had to fix myself that should have been caught during their inspection. I have only been back once for an oil change for $110.00, but have since found an indy that I trust to perform my regular maintenance.
 

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Sahuarita, AZ 2018 Forester Limited
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It doesn't help that Tucson has some of the worst roads in the Country... but have since found an indy that I trust to perform my regular maintenance.
Tucson and Pima County.

Who is your independent mechanic?
 

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2017 Touring CVT
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Desert Twang--your point about rainstorms leaving tire-puncturing crap on Tuscon streets reminded me of something my son, who attends UA, said about the local streets. There are no stormwater drains because it's the desert, so the nasty sharp things stay in the streets and don't get carried away.
 
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