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98 Forester
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Discussion Starter #1
Once again (and all too often) it's time to replace the front rotors on this `98 Forester.

I've only replaced rotors on one other vehicle that I recall (maybe two [?], but I'm only recalling one at the moment), and that was back in like 1990, on a Buick.

QUESTION 1: Is there a special tool of any sort (other than normal ratchet/sockets/etc.) that I will need, please? I recall having to have a specific Torx bit last time...a larger size than typically common - like a "40" or something, to loosen the calipers on the Buick.

QUESTION 2: Is anyone able/willing to supply a link where I might purchase some decent quality rotors please? We live in the mountains, and our brakes take a beating here, so I don't want the cheapest thing I can find - yet again...

Thanks in advance...
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
For replacement rotors, check out this website. Import Replacement Parts | Import Performance & OEM Parts I've purchased rotors from there in the past, and they have very good prices. They have a few brands of rotors for your car - Brembo, Meyle, and OP Parts. The Brembos are the most expensive, but they're probably the best quality. I've heard some bad things about Meyle from the Audi crowd; don't know anything about OP Parts.

BREMBO Front Brake Disc,SUB040587 - importrp

Muchas Gracias!
- and oh, do you have any experience with slotted and/or drilled rotors? Are they really much better? Most importantly - do they tend to last longer??

Thanks again,
glenn
 

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2010 Forester
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I agree with Arthrogrian19's assessment of the Brembo rotors -- I put a set on my wife's MB E320 and after 4 yrs, they still look great. Drilled rotors look nice but keep in mind that they heat up faster because of the loss of metal (but they cool off faster). They will also crack (between holes) under high stress so you're better off with just slotted rotors. Also, if you go that route ("sport" rotors), make sure that the vent vanes are directional (which requires different left and right rotors) -- I did see a company that re-designed the venting system so that the vents would work in either direction (same rotor for left and right). For pads, I like Porterfield's R4-S as they throw less dust and are rotor friendly. You may also want to replace the brake hoses with Goodridge's, and after you do that, bleed out the system.

Regards,
paul...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I agree with Arthrogrian19's assessment of the Brembo rotors -- I put a set on my wife's MB E320 and after 4 yrs, they still look great. Drilled rotors look nice but keep in mind that they heat up faster because of the loss of metal (but they cool off faster). They will also crack (between holes) under high stress so you're better off with just slotted rotors. Also, if you go that route ("sport" rotors), make sure that the vent vanes are directional (which requires different left and right rotors) -- I did see a company that re-designed the venting system so that the vents would work in either direction (same rotor for left and right). For pads, I like Porterfield's R4-S as they throw less dust and are rotor friendly. You may also want to replace the brake hoses with Goodridge's, and after you do that, bleed out the system.

Regards,
paul...
Great info again - thanks ...
 

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Muchas Gracias!
- and oh, do you have any experience with slotted and/or drilled rotors? Are they really much better? Most importantly - do they tend to last longer??

Thanks again,
glenn
For your application, Brembo blank rotors and good pads should be fine. If you want to get fancy, stainless lines will improve pedal firmness.
 

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Honestly the best rotors out there for a daily driver are the Centric premiums which you can order off tirerack.com. They're cheaper than the brembos and all non-swept surfaces are coated to prevent rust. No need for fancy or expensive rotors as theres going to be no difference between them in daily driving, especially slotted or drilled as they'll just reduce life (they have ZERO benefit on a daily driver).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Honestly the best rotors out there for a daily driver are the Centric premiums which you can order off tirerack.com. They're cheaper than the brembos and all non-swept surfaces are coated to prevent rust. No need for fancy or expensive rotors as theres going to be no difference between them in daily driving, especially slotted or drilled as they'll just reduce life (they have ZERO benefit on a daily driver).

Thanks ... so you're saying that even in "regular" mountainous driving (routine/daily, for us), there would be no gain in longevity/service-life, with slotted rotors?

Thanks again...
 

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Thanks ... so you're saying that even in "regular" mountainous driving (routine/daily, for us), there would be no gain in longevity/service-life, with slotted rotors?

Thanks again...
For a daily-driven vehicle, you probably wouldn't notice the difference. I'm upgrading to WRX 4 piston brakes, and I'm going to do Brembo blanks. Slotted rotors tend to eat pads faster, and drilled rotors tend to crack.
 

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Honestly the best rotors out there for a daily driver are the Centric premiums which you can order off tirerack.com.
Listen to the monkey. I went the Centric premium route when I upgraded to the 4/2 pot setup.
I don't remember needing special tools (but I have a fairly complete set of bits since I work on dirt bikes so maybe I just didn't pay attention)
You use a couple of 8mm bolts to pry the old rotors out if they are stuck. You thread them into the holes you can see in the picture (one is clearly visible, the other one is mostly hidden by one of the stud)

 

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Discussion Starter #12
Listen to the monkey. I went the Centric premium route when I upgraded to the 4/2 pot setup.
I don't remember needing special tools (but I have a fairly complete set of bits since I work on dirt bikes so maybe I just didn't pay attention)
You use a couple of 8mm bolts to pry the old rotors out if they are stuck. You thread them into the holes you can see in the picture (one is clearly visible, the other one is mostly hidden by one of the stud)


Excellent - thank you much ... I think the tool issue I was referring to was in reference to loosening/re-tightening the caliper...

And thanks again - the picture's worth a thousand words...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
For a daily-driven vehicle, you probably wouldn't notice the difference. I'm upgrading to WRX 4 piston brakes, and I'm going to do Brembo blanks. Slotted rotors tend to eat pads faster, and drilled rotors tend to crack.

Very good info! Thanks again much!
 

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Why are you replacing the rotors? It's the pads you want to upgrade for heavy mountain driving. As mentioned, rotors don't offer any improvements until you step up to two piece for the track.
 

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Other than two 8mm by at least 25 mm bolts, just a decent set of metric sockets, and a way to press in the caliper piston. (I use a c-clamp)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Why are you replacing the rotors? It's the pads you want to upgrade for heavy mountain driving. As mentioned, rotors don't offer any improvements until you step up to two piece for the track.
The rotors are warped (again, as usual) - thank you for this info, I will look into a good set of pads as well - thanks again...
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It's most likely the pads that are your problem not the rotors.

Thanks again, but these rotors are flaking-away around the edges from rust. We get a good bit of snow/ice and salt treatment on the roads here - and this past winter was exceptionally heavy/bad.
 

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Great info - thank you!
IF you're doing the rotors, I'd get some PB blaster or other penetrating liquid. You have to remove the caliper brackets to get the rotor off, and on the front, the caliper bracket to knuckle bolts can be a bit difficult to get off if theres any significant amount of rust.
 
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