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2016 Forester XT AT
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Discussion Starter #1
These carry about 100 tons of logs. Last new ones were built in the early 90's but many 30-40 year old ones still around. They just keep getting re-built. Note the offset cabs from regular highway trucks, giving a sense of the size of these "fat" trucks.

First two taken near Holberg/Winter Harbour, BC:






This one between Port Alberni and Bamfield, BC:

 

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2004 fxt A/T
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I was thinking the same thing. Why can't we leave trees >100 y/o alone?:icon_frown:


BIG trucks though.
Where else would you advise getting 2x12 boards from? Unless you are willing to go to steel studs, wood is still the cheapest and lightest option. Young growth wood is good for making pulp and that is about it.
 

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2004 Forester 4EAT
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I don't disagree, but it still makes me sad. (and microlams are stronger than 2x12's:)
 

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I don't disagree, but it still makes me sad. (and microlams are stronger than 2x12's:)
Agreed, engineered lumber is great for beams over 16'. However, they are cost prohibitive for anything shorter. The spruce goose was made of laminated veneers, that is a huge testimony to its strength. I agree more old growth forests should be preserved, the tough part is our grandfathers and great grandfathers cleared a lot of them. The remaining lots are generally way out or very small private leases. A prime example is the section of I-40 at the NC/TN line, complete ridges and valleys were cleared and floated down the pigeon river.
 

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i think logging is good. cut the older trees and plant new trees..
new trees give out more oxygen than the older ones!! :D
I come from a logging family though. So i am biased
 

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2000 Forester L NA auto
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I'm just pleased to see that at least here in North America there is a strong conservation movement where logging is concerned. New trees are planted as old growth is removed. The need for trees is a fact of life so its great to see new forest emerge from cut areas. Now if we could just convince the maniacs mowing down the rain forests of the Amazon to do the same we would be getting somewhere.
 

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Nice pics Will, you need one of the Forester parked beside it for reference :biggrin:

I remember running into those guys on the way to Bamfield, It's a good thing they don't run on the interior roads!
 

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2016 Forester XT AT
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks to all who have made comments. Most were not quite what I expected as I thought these would appeal to the gear heads here rather than take the bit of a green turn. But then again this is a Subaru forum!

Here in BC, 14.26% (13.5 million hectares) of our land base is protected in parks and several parks are pushing the 1,000,000 ha mark. (source: About BC Parks - BC Parks - Province of British Columbia ) We also have areas within working forest that are set aside for old growth managemnt areas, widlife and other values. Some put the total area in BC under some level of protection or conservation at close to 50%. So I would say we have lots of area, including old growth forests, that are conserved for the enjoyment of future generations. The irony of this whole debate is that the largest clearcuts are the urban areas that will not see another forest for a very long time.

Of course this is a controversial topic here in BC but we do the best we can. At least its a renewable resource when managed right.

Part of what I do in forestry is audit forest practices to ensure they are in conformance with voluntary environmental standards, such as ISO 14001, Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) sustainable forestry standard. I also audit the SFI and PEFC chain of custody's of forest companies. So I am very confident that our forest resources in Canada (I have audited in BC, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and Newfoundland) are well managed at this time. Much better than when I started in the industry 30 years ago. More on forest certification in Canada is here: Canadian Sustainable Forestry Certification Coalition - Coalition canadienne pour la certification de la foresterie durable


Nice pics Will, you need one of the Forester parked beside it for reference :biggrin:

I remember running into those guys on the way to Bamfield, It's a good thing they don't run on the interior roads!
Thanks Mike,

Yes, a comparison shot is in order, but I won't be back in the area till November.

The last one, with the Western red cedar load, is very near Bamfield, heading to Sarita sort.


And one more, when Fat Trucks go bad they look like this (this was from a Safety Alert, left front wheel broke going into a sharp right corner, went over a bank, rolled down the +80% slope, ended up in a stream 45m downslope. Minor injuries to the driver as he was wearing a seatbelt. Fortunately the truck was empty):

 

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2009 Forester X 4 A/T
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The FAT trucks are some serious HD beasts. We have a good deal of hardwood logging in W.PA but no on road trucks that big. Most of the trees harvested around here end up cut into veneer "peeler" blanks, for the bigger stuff and mine props, pallets and wood chips for the rest.

One of the few preserved virgin old growth forests in PA- 'Hearts Content' with towering 300 ft tall spruce and hemlock has seen all but a few of its largest trees either die or be felled by wind in the past 20 years.Even with preservation- some trees only live so long.
Most of the state was covered with coniferous giants 400 years ago. The current mix of hardwoods covering most of Penn's Woods today is third, fourth, and fifth growth- proof that an active logging industry doesn't need to deforest - a lesson the greedy bastards in the Amazon must soon learn!!
 

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2016 Forester XT AT
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Discussion Starter #12
Yup, lots of second and in some cases third growth logging on the west coast of Canada. And Fat Trucks are used for that too.
 

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2009 Forester 2.5x
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Love them or hate them, those trucks are awesome beasts. Logging being one of the most dangerous occupations, I have to wonder if driving the logging truck might be the most dangerous job in logging?? Think of the tonnage involved if one of those babies rolls over....

Steve
09 2.5 X AT(I hauled some firewood last winter:biggrin:)

p.s. Now could someone further North send us some pics of the trucks that haul Athabascan tar sand? I've heard that those are behemoths...
 
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