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J

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I'm a big proponent of studded snow tires. The following two-part article is the best I've ever come across in years of searching for articles on the subject. It dispels many of the negative myths surrounding studs. It also supports or repeats many of the findings and conclusions contained in articles published in Canada and Scandinavia, where for many years a lot of research, mainly by unbiased sources, has been done on studs.

http://www.pfmmag.com/JulyAugust2004/Julyauguststuddedtires.htm

http://www.pfmmag.com/Sept Oct 04/septoct2004studdedtires.htm

EDITED on Jan. 11 to repost the links, because the originally posted links did not work.
 

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jmacmaster-
Couldn't open your links, but running around Anchorage Alaska the last couple of weeks, I can guarantee you NOBODY without studs can stay with the FXT once we're on packed snow/ice...(thank you studded Haka 2s!)
-Quick
 

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Sydney Dinner Organiser
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the link have ... in them, looks like you copied the text of an abbrev of the link, rather than the full link.
 
J

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Quicksilver said:
jmacmaster-
Couldn't open your links
-Quick
Sorry about that. I've replaced the originally posted links and then checked them in my original post to see if they work. They do.
 

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Here is a link to a snowtire forum thread discussing studded vs unstudded. There are many linked articles:
http://snowtire.info/forum/viewtopic.php?t=41

Also, my Hakkapelitta 4s are doing great! They are scaring the clouds away here in Rochester, we’ve barely gotten any snow this season. (When we have had snow these tires have so much grip, they are amazing).
 

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Harbor Fright
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OH FO SHO said:
Here is a link to a snowtire forum thread discussing studded vs unstudded. There are many linked articles:
http://snowtire.info/forum/viewtopic.php?t=41

Also, my Hakkapelitta 4s are doing great! They are scaring the clouds away here in Rochester, we’ve barely gotten any snow this season. (When we have had snow these tires have so much grip, they are amazing).
My RSI's have better dry grip than the stock PsOS (and no squeal). Maybe they would make some fish a good reef...
 

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What is often overlooked is that studded tires roughen up smooth icy surfaces...
This quote from the first article cited above is pertinent to the article's credibility. I can tell you with no uncertainty whatsoever that studded tires also roughen up paved surfaces, including concrete. The mountain highways in Colorado are clear testament to this, and there are concrete ones with roughened versions of the grooves the article discusses. These were not made by heavy trucks squishing grooves into the concrete. Concrete doesn't work that way. The article's implications that studs don't hurt roadways much are thus somewhat questionable.

That said, I'm a big proponent of studs when conditions warrant. Because changing tires everytime the roads get bad is a too much of a pain, the decision has to be based on the predominant conditions. But because they let you drive "normally" in any conditions, they're a huge safety improvement. And studs on an AWD vehicle make it second only to a bulldozer for go- and stop-power. HPH
 

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Dr.Cloud-
They do, don't they though!
Here in Anchorage, we have a couple of thoroughfares (each with six lanes) that cross each other, and have about the same amount of traffic, with about the same amount of time since last repaving...that amounts to about 12 studded tire ruts that you cross...you get used to the rhythm if you go through at the same speed each day...when you make a turn, though, it's kind of like synchopated and can throw your steering off a little.
But it's not all studded tires fault...everybody falls into the same rut (or ride the uneven packed snow/ice) and adds to the wear.
Does everybody here have studded tires? No. Some do okay with good unstudded snow tires. You have to look out for them, because they don't turn as well, they definitely don't stop as well, and there's not an unstudded tired vehicle in town that can keep up with a studded tire vehicle. Clear difference.
-Quick
 
J

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DrCloud said:
I can tell you with no uncertainty whatsoever that studded tires also roughen up paved surfaces, including concrete. The mountain highways in Colorado are clear testament to this, and there are concrete ones with roughened versions of the grooves the article discusses. These were not made by heavy trucks squishing grooves into the concrete. Concrete doesn't work that way. The article's implications that studs don't hurt roadways much are thus somewhat questionable.
Of course studs roughen up, and wear down, paved surfaces. The question is: "How much, and is it as much as some people claim". Here are some quotes from the first article:

"There was a cost to be paid for this safety device, however, and this was the wear and rutting that studded tires produced on Finnish roads, and on the roads of other countries where significant numbers of drivers used studded tires."

"However, as illustrated by the ruts on the accompanying photograph taken recently of a residential street in Toronto, Ontario, where studs have been banned for some 30 years, ruts are primarily caused by regular traffic, not by vehicles with studded tires. It only stands to reason after all that a 3,000-pound car that travels perhaps 7,000 miles per year on its studded winter tires is going to make much less of an 'impression' on the road surface than a 90,000-pound 18-wheeler that covers 50,000 to 100,000 miles per year. This is obvious from looking at any asphalt roadway with heavy truck traffic, where the four tracks from the dual truck wheels are readily visible. Unless a very high proportion of vehicles are using studded tires, as in Scandinavia, what road surface wear they do produce is not a significant factor in the formation of ruts on paved roads, particularly with the latest designs of studs. Due to the huge popularity of studded tires and the resulting road surface problems they had created by the late 1970s, the Scandinavian countries had to take a positive approach, since their drivers regard them as an essential winter safety device. They conducted considerable research into the design of both studs and pavement, and eventually common regulations were introduced into Norway, Sweden and Finland under the Nordic Agreement.
The results of this extensive research have been major reductions in road surface wear coupled with an increase in the friction of studded tires. Perhaps the single most important development was the reduction in the weight of studs, from about 3g in the 1960s to a regulated maximum of about 1.1g today. This alone reduced pavement wear to about one third of its initial value. At the same time, the replacement of bias ply tires with radial tires over this period also resulted in a reduction of approximately 50% in the pavement wear due to studded winter tires, due to the much greater stability of a radial tire in the contact patch area where the tread contacts the road surface. Consequently, over the past 40 years in Finland, there has been a reduction of about 80% in the rate of road wear due to studded winter tires. At the same time as these great strides were being made in stud design, progress was also made in developing more durable pavements through the selection of more wear resistant aggregates and asphalt mixes. An additional benefit due to improved vehicle design has come from the growing popularity of ABS brakes, since a wheel with a studded winter tire that is controlled by ABS will scrape the road surface far less than one that locks up fully under braking. The introduction of traction control on the drive axles has similar benefits."

The point being made above is two-fold: (1) Because of certain improvements in studs and vehicles, studs do not cause as much damage as they used to, and (2) regular traffic alone, and especially 18-wheelers, wears down and ruts roads, as shown by the ruts in Toronto, where studs have been banned for about 30 years. Anyone who's driven a freeway that hasn't been resurfaced for years, in a state that bans studs, knows this, because you can actually see and feel the ruts. DrCloud is correct in stating that heavy trucks do not squish grooves in concrete; however, they definitely wear ruts in the concrete

The article makes another point, in the following quote:

"It was found that reductions in the number of cars using studded tires from the current level of about 90% down to 50% or even 20% would result in an overall increase in societal costs to Finland (primarily due to increased accidents) of about US$50 to US$110 million respectively each year. The result of this study was so clear and in line with similar studies done in Sweden that the Finnish Road Administration, after years of opposition to studded tires, has changed its policy and now recommends their use."

In an effort to save road repair costs necessitated by the asserted road damage caused by studs, various states (and Canadian provinces) have banned studs. This from governments that constantly pass laws that are "for our own good" and that require us to do something or prohibit us from doing something. Examples in the highways and motor vehicles field are seat belt and motorcycle helmet laws. Yet, when those governments can save money by taking from us something that increases our safety, like studs, they don't hesitate to do so. Am I the only one that sees the irony and hypocrisy in this?
 

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First: really good articles !

FXT22 said:
My RSI's have better dry grip than the stock PsOS (and no squeal). Maybe they would make some fish a good reef...
Im really amazed by my RSI's grip. They adjust very well to (salty) slush, dry asphalt and ice/hard packed snow.

However, snow is what they do best.

You just have to be a bit careful untill they have 'adjusted' to the right 'temperature' when road conditions change.

The RSI's go more 'swampy' with higer temps. I just have to guess that above 15C they are soft as cheese 8)

For me and the climate I live in, the Nokian Hakkapelitan RSI and the forester are the ultimate match.

This is my first winter with studd-free tires so I dont know yet how well they do on wet steel-ice.. I find out in April :roll:
So far these are the best winter tires I ever driven.. :twisted:

Edit:
I read my post agin and realized I was going off topic..

so, even if myself are best off with non-studded tires, others are not.
I find it crazy to not alow studds when conditions require them!
 

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The new advance on tire studs technologies mean that they are less and less invasive on roads.

I use Maxigrip studs from MaxigripStore and they work perfectly fine for me.
 

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The new advance on tire studs technologies mean that they are less and less invasive on roads.

I use Maxigrip studs from MaxigripStore and they work perfectly fine for me.
Spam. But for anyone reading, don't even bother googling, they're not street legal, and they're not as good as the studs you get in studdable tires anyway.
 
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