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1999 Forester auto
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118 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Things I learned and tools needed to get it done:

14mm hex socket to remove block plugs for piston pins
24mm deep socket to remove oil filter cooler
14mm 12 point socket to remove head bolts
12mm 12 point socket to remove block bolts.
#3 Phillips impact driver to remove piston pin plates in the bellhousing area
22mm 6 point socket to remove crank pulley bolt

The crank pulley and nose may be lightly corroded and prying against the oil pump gently with a pry bar after you spray it with penetrating oil will work.

Removing the A/C isn't necessary (99 Forester,) removing the exhaust is, it will hang up on the motor mounts. The motor has to slide forward about 4 inches if you don't remove the two lower studs, which is ok, I suspect it will line up more easily going back in. The transmission torque strut being removed does allow more room when separating the block and trans. The list in the older Chiltons on removing the motor is mostly accurate and detailed.

Removing the serpentine accessories and intake helps access the bellhousing bolts, you can use a nylon sling wrapped under the heads rather than chains. Don't wrap the transmission lines or headers. If you leave the oil pan on, you will need more lift to get it out over the radiator support, about 9-10 inches. Expect the front of the car to rise up and require more lift, too. Therefore be careful about using a comealong from a beam overhead to get the motor out - it takes up a lot of your vertical space. The motor is about 28 inches high, the front lifts 6-10 inches, etc.

Engine disassembly link: Tearing down an EJXX block with pictures. Head Removal, splitting block - Subaru Impreza GC8 & RS Forum & Community: RS25.com

Tips and Tricks: Tricks of the "trade" (group effort) - NASIOC
This one is good info about tapping the bushings to remove them from the case, it's a precision fit for the main bearings and the bushings are apparently not on the market to replace those scored up from getting removed with vice grips.

From my aged perspective, living in the Midwest means supplies of used motors and parts are limited. That includes the major chains, my auto parts store doesn't carry reman cranks, and reman motors are double those on ebay. If you have the ability and facility, doing your own rebuild will likely result in you saving another 40 to 60% compared to the economy rebuilds available - you save your labor costs, which helps. With used motors and reman ones on the web at nearly the same price, don't dismiss it out of hand. While the removal and repair isn't an easy job, in comparison to others, it's no worse, and you can actually pick up and carry the separate parts easily. You can't do that with cast iron blocks, cranks, heads, etc.
 

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Registered
1999 Forester auto
Joined
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118 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Torx bolts in the EJ25 cam cradle

Removing the SOHC cam cradles - the Torx bolts can be difficult to loosen.

Spray with a penetrating oil and let soak. The ones outside the valve cover get a lot more spray from road salt and are usually the worst.

With a drift punch and 16 oz hammer, place the punch on the top of the Torx and give it half a dozen sharp raps. You aren't trying to drive a nail, but hard enough to drive the bolt against the threads in the head and loosen the typical corrosion that steel bolts in an aluminum hole develop. It's also why the bolts are plated, to reduce it, but it still happens.

Do this before attempting to remove. The longer it soaks, the better. What penetrating oil you choose is up to you, but don't get deceived that if it comes out of a spray can that it must be ok. HINT: Penetrating oil isn't marketed to dry out distributor caps or lubricate lock cylinders. The guys who make that stuff now sell something else marked "Penetrating Oil" clearly marked on the new product's label.

Just the same as the 14mm hex plugs, try various Torx drivers to get the best fit. The correct driver will be tight right off - don't use sloppy loose ones because the splines will be too short and cause the wings in the bolt head to fold over. Since many Torx bits are swaged, the splines might be a larger diameter closer to the base. If so, dressing the bit shorter might give a better fit.

When you do insert the bit to turn out the fastener, get directly over the bolt, have the head securely fastened down so it can't move, and apply firm pressure not only downward but at the end of the longest breaker bar you have. Leverage is your advantage, but it only works if the bit has a secure fit.

Once all that is done the fastener should turn out fairly easy. Then you find out whether the cam journals are in good enough shape to actually use. There's more to a cam than the lobes.

Can you use an impact gun of some sort, maybe. If it's too high capacity, it could just as easily strip the splines in a second, and the whole point of an impact is no different than hammering on the bolt - to loosen it's grip and help it turn. If you rap the bolts with a drift punch, you have literally used an impact. You won't strip the Torx hammering it. If you do, you get to surf "How to drill out and remove a broken bolt" on the web. It involves using a much smaller bit, drilling a hole in the fastener, not breaking it, then inserting an "easy out" which expands in the hole to grab the shank. If you are lucky, the extra swelling of the easy out isn't a problem. If it breaks off, you are now in line to pay a machine shop to get around to it when your turn comes up. It's often first come first served.
 
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