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2010 FXT
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
OK guys, 2nd post on this site. Please be gentle.

I have an XT on order and wonder if an EGT gage would be beneficial. I use one on my Cummins and don't shut down the engine until I'm around 300F. If one would be useful, what temps should I shut down at and what temp is max for the engine? Also, can you suggest souces of supply for gage pods? I have them on the pillar on my truck and was thinking of the same place for the XT. Anyplace else better?
 

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2007 Forester Sports XT 4EAT
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I like having lots of gauges, so if you want an EGT gauge, go for it. IMO, like the turbo timer, it's really not necessary on our XT models. :wink:

Bobby...

My MODding Journal
 

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2016 Outback and WRX CVT
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2,551 Posts
^ Agreed.

But in reality, unless you routinely put your car in very demanding situations (i.e. tow, off-road, track/strip/AutoX, self-tune, etc.), such gauges are typically decorative, particularly if you don't mount them in direct sightline and/or if they do not incorporate some type of active warning alert (be it visual or audible).

On our Subarus, the typical place to mount the EGT probe would be at the exhaust manifold. In such a location, common idling temperatures are around 800 deg. F., and in normal driving, expect something ranging upwards of 1200-1350 deg. F. Run hard, temperatures should be well less than 1550 deg. F.

If she trips over the 1600 deg. F line, I'd well bet that something would be askew enough that you'd already be throwing CELs. But if it hasn't, then it might be good to pull over and turn her off.....

As for a gauge pod, I honestly am not sure that there's anything out there specifically for the SH-Foresters, yet - however, various generics available from popular aftermarket Vendors here and throughout the various Subaru communities should encompass anything that you can well desire. In addition to Vendors listed here, also try the Forum Vendors at NASIOC, IWSTI, and LegacyGT.com . :smile:
 

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2010 FXT
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies. Is there any suggested temp that the gage should drop to prior to shutting down? That's what I really use the EGT gage for in the truck - it helps in preventing the oil from cooking on the shaft fo the turbo.
 

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2004 Subaru FXT MT
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Thanks for the replies. Is there any suggested temp that the gage should drop to prior to shutting down? That's what I really use the EGT gage for in the truck - it helps in preventing the oil from cooking on the shaft fo the turbo.
With watercooled turbos, such as we have, this isn't really a concern. Typically, the oil is keep well below the coking temp. Under normal driving, I let the motor idle for 10 seconds when I stop.

If I've been really on it and am sure that I've gone full spool, I wait a minute to let it wind back down.

I know those are rough guidelines, but really that is all you need. Not much risk here...
 

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2010 FXT
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Discussion Starter #6
You would think that I would have realized the turbo was water cooled prior to posting.

This is (well it's going to be) the wifey's car. She was looking forward to have a nice boost/EGT gage pod like I do. I'll break it to her that she "doesn't need it" for a stock set up. :icon_wink:
 

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2008 FSXT M/T
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4,167 Posts
nothing wrong w/ just a boost guage! and considering that there are really no gauge pod options available, a nice steering wheel or subygirl pod will be nice.
 

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2016 Outback and WRX CVT
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You would think that I would have realized the turbo was water cooled prior to posting.

This is (well it's going to be) the wifey's car. She was looking forward to have a nice boost/EGT gage pod like I do. I'll break it to her that she "doesn't need it" for a stock set up. :icon_wink:
^ Hey, if my wife wanted an EGT/boost gauge, I'd be glad to spend a few (hundred) dollars! You're a lucky man!!! :smile: :wink:

To the best of my knowledge, there isn't (yet) a current solution, in the form of, say, a BullyDog-type OBD-II based multimeter, that'll read *both* boost and EGT.

I know that for my BL Legacy, there's no factory EGT sensor outside of the pre-emissions-start-up-airpump equipped models ('05-'06 only, IIRC) having an EGT in the catted factory up-pipe ("UP", as we like to call it) - but that this sensor is not a true thermometer in that it simply resolves whether if the temperature is above X degrees (C., the SI measure, due to Subaru's ECU programming), which was determined to be sufficiently hot enough to damage that cat., which could then self-destruct and send pieces flying off into the turbo, which sits just downstream. Thus, it was a "cripple" DTC, which would shut the car down into failsafe mode to save the turbo - but by that point, one can imagine how hot the temperatures would have had to be at the cylinder banks, and as we Chinese like to say, it becomes a case of "worrying about one's mustache, when about to lose one's head!"

Thus, without a true EGT in the OBD-II parameters, no such type device (i.e. GReddy Informeter, Blitz R-VIT, MSD DashHawk, as well as various Open-Source or proprietary-based OBD II -to- carputer [i.e. OBDII Gauge v2 Alpha - Centrafuse Carputer, CarPC & UMPC Forums , ECUTeK's virtual dashboard for their DeltaDash datalogger, Garmin ecoRoute ESP module gets priced, detailed further -- Engadget , Magden Automotive - Products : Details , DashDAQ from Drew Technologies , ECUDatascan - OBD-II and aftermarket ECU scanners and displays - ECUDatascan. Now with included lap timer. , etc.] or even something as simplistic and old-school as the ScanGauge II) can display this information - so you're left to go with either something that can support an additional analog input for a sensor (probe) that you place yourself, or, alternatively, a dedicated gauge/sensor combo.

I'm a nut for gauges - my Legacy has a primary set of three AutoMeter NEXUS gauges (via their own traditional sensors, not OBD-II, and yes, the EGT is among one of these, and again, yes, among the reasons why I went with these gauges is their ability to give proper visual warning at user-set levels), an AEM UEGO wideband AFR, an AutoMeter voltmeter, and a GReddy Informeter (there's that OBD-II! :biggrin:).
 

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2010 FXT
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Discussion Starter #9
^ ...among the reasons why I went with these gauges is their ability to give proper visual warning at user-set levels...
I subscribe to the same trane of thought. It's better to know you have a problem before you really have a problem.

As for not requiring gauges unless you're driving it hard... Let's just say that during the test drive, the salesman asked her to "slow down" and that was with a X model.

Thanks for the replies.
 

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2016 Outback and WRX CVT
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As for not requiring gauges unless you're driving it hard... Let's just say that during the test drive, the salesman asked her to "slow down" and that was with a X model.
:biggrin:

I, too, favor harder test-drives, if nothing else but to feel-out what the car's traits might be under emergency situations.

I truly wonder if you guys might not be better off spending $300 or so for one of the less-pricey of those modern OBD-II based multimeters, then, as it'll allow greater functionality.

Certainly, EGT would be nice, particularly if y'all are demanding drivers....hard call.

Although an OBD-II based device would literally mean that there's no setup time at all (even a hardwire to source power, if-necessary, would be tremendously easy, given that the cabin fuse-box is located at the driver's knee), an EGT is a straightforward installation on our Subarus, too:

EGT tap - ClubWRX Forum - Subaru Impreza WRX and STi Community and Forums

As you can see, it's pretty easy to access the manifolds, thanks to our Boxer configuration, and there's even a nice casting nipple there to serve as a guide. :rock:
 

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2016 Outback and WRX CVT
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^ Exactly, I completely agree - required, no, not at all. Especially when datalogging as well as a temporary "tuning" installation of a wideband O2, etc., can easily and correctly get the job done.

There's really no need for the clutter, and in many cases, either not having the gauges or simply using one of the OBD-II based devices can well be sufficient.

A good idea to have gauges?

Certainly, that can be argued in favor, and there's much to support the "pro" column of the debate - but at the same time, we should all remember that even with a full compliment of "vital" gauges, factors such as having proper sensor placement, good wiring/plumbing to avoid sensor failure (as well as, for that matter, sensor/sender malfunctions, outright), and good visualization of the gauges (including not only the ability to warn the driver of parameters which are approaching or exceeding "danger zones," along with proper knowledge of what the gauges, both singularly as well as in-tandem, are "telling you" about your car's health) are all just as important as having the gauges, themselves.
 
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