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Registered
2018 FORESTer XT Touring
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

i would appreciate information as to where the black box is located on my 2018 Forester XT Touring.

Also can anyone recommend a lock for the OBD II connector.

I guard my privacy and this car leaves much to be desired in this respect.

Thanks.
 

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2015 Forester 2.5 Premium CVT
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1,268 Posts
Welcome, @recon66 !

Sorry - don't have answers. I did a little searching some time back and wondered whether there actually is a physical "box," or if it's just functionality integrated with something else in the vehicle.

I just did a quick search in the service manual for my wife's 2015 and see that reading the EDR data requires the Subaru Select Monitor tool to access the Airbag System Diagnostics menu.

Here's a screenshot:



Mike
 

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2003 Forester X 5 MT
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522 Posts
OBD lock

https://www.etsy.com/listing/563644245/obd-port-lock?gpla=1&gao=1&&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=shopping_us_a-electronics_and_accessories-car_parts_and_accessories-car_accessories&utm_custom1=97c2113b-3396-4af3-894e-8a980b85a39d&utm_content=go_304501835_22746077195_78727309835_pla-106552232915_c__563644245&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIiamXk6PW4AIVk0wNCh2NuwUQEAQYASABEgK1DfD_BwE

Not sure that this vehicle is much different than any others with respect to the OBDII port access

I suspect that the EDR function is contained within the Body Integrated Unit, not something that can easily be removed or is part of the Air Bag Control Module, also something that can't be removed from the vehicle and have it operate normally.
 

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Registered
2018 FORESTer XT Touring
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hello,

Thank you both for your information and advice. Since my main concern is privacy, that the question as to owns the data captured in a crash by the EDR. Right now, the laws are ambiguous, and based on the present trends in our country civil liberties seem to be taking a back seat. See the explanation of the uses of the EDR in the present user's manual. The data which may or may not be incriminating for the driver, can be seized and used by law enforcement and possibly by other third parties. I can invoke the 5th Amendment, but the EDR cannot.

In the meantime, I will opt to lock out the OBD II connector. It will help somewhat against theft and unauthorized tampering. But others could remove the car's CPU and download the data.

My 2004 Forester XT does not have a black box. And when I bought the 2018, the dealer never discussed this change with me.

Anyway, again, thanks.
 

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2003 Forester X 5 MT
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522 Posts
Here is some interesting info about EDRs

https://iptm.unf.edu/uploadedFiles/summit/handouts/Ruth%20R_2_EDR%20Update%202018.pdf

Looks like from 2013 and on all Subaru's have EDR, over 99% of current manufacturers vehicles have EDRs.

On Subaru's that have EDRs it is a function of the Airbag Controller.

US Senate Bill 1925 “Driver Privacy Act” was introduced 2014 with bi-partisan support, to require warrant or owner
consent prior to accessing EDR. Passed as part of highway funding bill, signed into law Dec. 4, 2015.



SEC. 2. LIMITATIONS ON DATA RETRIEVAL FROM VEHICLE EVENT DATA RECORDERS.

(a) Ownership Of Data.—Any data retained by an event data recorder (as defined in section 563.5 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations), regardless of when the motor vehicle in which it is installed was manufactured, is the property of the owner, or, in the case of a leased vehicle, the lessee of the motor vehicle in which the event data recorder is installed.

(b) Privacy.—Data recorded or transmitted by an event data recorder described in subsection (a) may not be accessed by a person other than an owner or a lessee of the motor vehicle in which the event data recorder is installed unless—

(1) a court or other judicial or administrative authority having jurisdiction—

(A) authorizes the retrieval of the data; and

(B) to the extent that there is retrieved data, the data is subject to the standards for admission into evidence required by that court or other administrative authority;

(2) an owner or a lessee of the motor vehicle provides written or electronic consent to the retrieval of the data for any purpose, including the purpose of diagnosing, servicing, or repairing the motor vehicle;

(3) the data is retrieved pursuant to an investigation or inspection authorized under section 1131(a) or 30166 of title 49, United States Code, and the personally identifiable information of an owner or a lessee of the vehicle and the vehicle identification number is not disclosed in connection with the retrieved data, except that the vehicle identification number may be disclosed to the certifying manufacturer;

(4) the data is retrieved for the purpose of determining the need for, or facilitating, emergency medical response in response to a motor vehicle crash; or

(5) the data is retrieved for traffic safety research, and the personally identifiable information of an owner or a lessee of the vehicle and the vehicle identification number is not disclosed in connection with the retrieved data.

https://www.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/senate-bill/1925/text
 

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18' 2.5 Premium 6MT
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156 Posts
I feel you on this, maybe you need a thermite charge for the EDR. But to make you feel better or worse, your cell phone can acquire at least as much data excepting throttle position via it's accelerometer, x-y-z sensor, microphone and gps. And your phone can host all manner of apps that siphon sensor data off without any legitimate reason, ahem facebook/uber/google.

We live in a world of surveillance unfortunately. At least we are not quite to the state that China is, where traffic cameras pro-actively monitor seatbelt usage, driver behavior (inside the car), driver identity and match that to your social capital score.

Write your congress person, as futile as that seems, our only hope is to at least keep up with the data privacy efforts of Europe.
 

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Casper reincarnated
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2,246 Posts
By the looks of Miker104's reply it wouldn't matter one iota if you locked the OBDII port or not, police get a court order and your lock is useless.

Locks - security grilles and the likes, only keep honest people out.
 
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