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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've found that Subaru Eyesight can be dangerous.

1) Pre-Collision Braking: I've had this off since this engaged for the first time. I'd like to have it on, but it's too sensitive in my experience. (There is a discussion on this here: https://www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/f281/eyesight-vs-tumbleweed-799405/#/topics/799405 )

2) Adaptive Cruise Control: In my experience, it's really rough when braking. I'm able to more smoothly adjust the speed myself. Also, it has seen a vehicle (and matched their speed), and ended up losing it when going around a curve (understandable), and then doesn't always see it again after the curve (unacceptable). So, if they slow down (for a turn), the Subaru will continue at it at full speed. I've stopped using this feature around traffic because it's dangerous and unpredictable.

3) Lane Keep Assist: This is my favorite feature. I'm not planning on turning it off. But, it's dangerous. There are situations that require you to leave the marked lane, and it tries to force you back in the lane, which can cause an accident. I don't mind the gentle adjustments, but if I'm clearly turning the wheel attempting to leave the lane, and it tries forcing me back, that's a huge safety concern. It has almost caused me to have an accident when passing a vehicle and also tried to push me towards a construction zone where they had cones to direct people to drive in the shoulder of the road.


In my opinion, this system is not ready. I'd like to see the current Subaru Eyesight get updated at each service visit (software, and hardware, as they are released).


What is your opinion of Subaru Eyesight? Do you think they should update each system, or just leave it as it is?
 

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"Dangerous" is an extreme over-exaggeration.

In regards to your points above:

1) You haven't provided any examples of how Eyesight is dangerous when employing pre-collision braking or provided any personal anecdotes of how it has created a dangerous situation, so I'm not sure why you find this feature to be dangerous.

2) Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) seems to work as described. The situation you've described is one where the driver should expect that Adaptive Cruise Control will not make the adjustment. In your example, the turning car has probably slowed significantly, creating a large speed differential between your car and the turning car. Due to this large speed differential, ACC/Eyesight will not recognize the turning car as a moving object, so it barrels ahead expecting the driver to make any necessary adjustments or until it needs to apply pre-collision breaking when it gets too close to the turning car. The ACC system provides visual and audio cues to the driver to indicate when it has "acquired" a vehicle within its range, so that the driver can make an informed decision about how to handle particular situations.

At the end of the day, the ACC system is not an automated driving system; it's a driver assist system. It will not be able to take in to account lazy/inattentive drivers who don't bother with monitoring the ACC info while driving, but it will help reduce the chances of a crash and/or reduce the severity of a crash.

3) You haven't provided any examples of how Lane Keep Assist (LKA) is dangerous. Instead, you've provided examples of user error; it sounds like you don't understand how to properly use LKA. When LKA is engaged, the driver has to utilize their turns signals to temporarily disengage LKA to allow for unmitigated lane departure. Start using your turn signals and you won't have any issues.

Overall, I find the Eyesight features to be useful and helpful. For me, these features certainly remove a great deal of mental stress/fatigue when on a lengthy road trip.

As far as updating, of course they should (and do) update the system.
 

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2014 Touring with Eyesigh CVT
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"Dangerous" is an extreme over-exaggeration.

At the end of the day, the ACC system is not an automated driving system; it's a driver assist system. It will not be able to take in to account lazy/inattentive drivers who don't bother with monitoring the ACC info while driving, but it will help reduce the chances of a crash and/or reduce the severity of a crash..
+1
:mob:

Laughing at oneself and with others is good for the Soul
 

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Prolly not the comment you seek, nonetheless:

Call me old fashioned, but I’m of the opinion that anything other than being fully-engaged in the act of driving is dangerous—and eyesight encourages inattentiveness.

All of these various driving assistants being offered by Subaru and all of the other car manufacturers enable the bad habit of not being fully engaged in the act of driving. People assume that their automobiles various asstive technologies will cover for them while they space out, and the result is that we have a huge amount of drivers on the road who are not adequately engaged in what they are doing, to the point of being an actual danger to themselves and others.

Maybe it is just the bay-area bubble I live in but so many drivers are inexcusably inattentive (if not outright incompetent). It seems like 1/3 are on their smartphones, and probably 2/3 refuse to use their turn signals or make any attempt to plan lane changes in advance, or merge correctly etc ... I feel like all of these driver assist technologies are just making the situation worse by encouraging people to space out.

If you are paying attention, and actively focused on what you are doing: none of this stuff is necessary and will probably just annoy the piss out of you. If you aren't ... well ... yeah IMO: it is dangerous.
 

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2019 Sport CVT
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You could argue that it would be a lot safer if everyone could still shoe their own horses and make their own soap... But the truth is people have gone from bad drivers to horrible drivers.

Personally I rather like having something keeping an eye on them to nudge them back into their lane and jamb on their brakes for them, instead of plowing into me. Having or not having these system won't make them put down their phones or make them a better driver. One day the steering wheel and pedals will be gone, and we're working on getting there. One jump in technology at a time.

I've had my '19 for a 3 weeks. My daily commute is about 90 miles of freeway driving and I'm loving the ACC. In my '12 I would probably zone out and let the back of my brain do the driving while I'm thinking about solving work problems. Now, I'm spending my thinking watching the car do it's thing. Personally it's made me more engaged in the driving. But that's me.

I didn't get the blind side detection as I thought I would learn to use it instead of turning my head for a better look and someday that would bite me on a car without it. But so far I'd sold on the EyeSight thing.
 

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If you are paying attention, and actively focused on what you are doing: none of this stuff is necessary and will probably just annoy the piss out of you. If you aren't ... well ... yeah IMO: it is dangerous.

In a perfect world, none of the collision avoidance features would be needed.

However, we don’t live in that world, nor are we likely to get there in our lifetimes.
 

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Rated in decreasing order of preference:

- Adaptive Cruise Control - I love it when out on the Interstates or the major through roads! I set it one notch below max interval. Yes, on rare occasions it will get fooled and over-react, especially when the car in front of me takes an exit. But no big deal.

- Pre-collision braking - It has only kicked in once when out on the road, and it's a tossup whether it or my foot hit the brakes first. It was indeed a very valid call. It has occasionally gotten fooled by overhanging wet branches in my long, wooded driveway. But again, no big deal.

- Lane Keep Assist (Auto-Nudge) - I have disabled it. It violates my New England ethic of never doing anything sudden on a snowy or icy road, and it can get fooled by tracks left by snow plows.

But Bottomley's Bottom Line - I'm the guy in charge!
 

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2019 3.6R & 98 Forester Atlanta, GA
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Good point about lane assist. I like it here in Georgia when it is nice out and not driving on the downtown connector. But having lived up north I know not to ever use it during the winter or other than totally dry roads conditions.
 

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You can't take the New England out of Richard.
 

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The only time I find that ACC is a little hazardous is when it's used on surface (non-highway) streets, which is not what it was designed for, anyway.

I routinely engage the cruise control/ACC when I'm driving on residential and business streets where the speed limit is typically 25-35 MPH. I know this is not the intended use, but I find this keeps me from inadvertently exceeding the speed limit. Normally, I use the brake (momentarily cancelling the ACC) as I approach an intersection, especially if traffic is stopped at the intersection or I'm going to turn.

If I don't turn off the ACC and turn through the intersection behind another car, my car will slow as Eyesight "sees" the car in front of me, but it will speed up again (trying to get back to whatever I've set it for, e.g. the posted speed limit) as the car in front of me turns out of my path and and I start my turn. This will be, of course, too fast to make the turn safely.

Eyesight and ACC aren't a version of Autopilot. Drivers need to use it appropriately and always be ready to assume full control, especially while driving in traffic.

All that said, I've found Eyesight to be very reliable, and I'm now spoiled for driving cars that don't have it.
 

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Yes, I have to readapt when driving a rental car with an incomplete implementation of what we have.
 

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I agree!
I just experienced the pre collision activation today and it actually almost caused me to hit the car.
I haven’t had any issues with the lane assist forcing be back into the he lane but I do agree some situations make you leave the lane for whatever reason.
One thing I don’t like is another braking system. I work in NYC and my car will break or slow me down if it thinks I’m going to hit someone. Another situations was someone merged close BEHIND me and again this brake was activated almost causing an accident.
It’s almost too safe if that is even possible. Sometimes too many bells and whistles isn’t what’s best.
Hopefully they can fix the glitches
 

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True, they really need to update and tweak it do it does better. The automatic braking is way to scary,has almost caused me to be rear ended a few times and the lane assist is freaky...even when you try to shut it off it still kinda has some feedback if you try changing lanes without using your blinker or if the lanes merge or there are old lines on the road
 

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2014 Touring with Eyesigh CVT
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I agree!

I just experienced the pre collision activation today and it actually almost caused me to hit the car.

I havenâ€t had any issues with the lane assist forcing be back into the he lane but I do agree some situations make you leave the lane for whatever reason.

One thing I donâ€t like is another braking system. I work in NYC and my car will break or slow me down if it thinks Iâ€m going to hit someone. Another situations was someone merged close BEHIND me and again this brake was activated almost causing an accident.

Itâ€s almost too safe if that is even possible. Sometimes too many bells and whistles isnâ€t whatâ€s best.

Hopefully they can fix the glitches
The ACC wasn't design for city traffic where stop and go traffic is the norm, take a few minutes to read the warnings in the Owner's Manual, what you just described is one of the warnings, it not autonomous vehicle and ACC is a driver assistance to help with fatigue on open roads or highway roads.

Laughing at oneself and with others is good for the Soul
 

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I always hated gadgets in cars. Until my wife bought her 2019 Forester Limited. Now, I want one!

EyeSight is the bomb. Crash avoidance likely saved my bacon on the first road trip we took it on. I was paying attention, saw the other guy suddenly change lanes, and probably would have stopped in time. But the automation was faster than I was. And if I had been distracted and not had EyeSight, it would have been a rear-ender on the interstate for sure. Neither my wife nor I have experienced any false activation of crash avoidance.

Adaptive cruise is also excellent. I compare it to being held by a Star Trek tractor beam when someone ahead slows down. But, ACC is not intended to be used in slow heavy traffic. Nor is old-fashion cruise control.

Lane assist? Also a wizard invention. If anyone thinks that the "nudge" is too strong, then maybe something is wrong. Also, I'd like to point out that proper use of turn signals defeats lane assist automatically. So if one is doing a lot of tricky maneuvers such the lane assist is bothersome, turn signal use is called for.
 
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