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SG9 Forester XT Stick Shift
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Discussion Starter #1
My current camber setup are 0.9 front and 1.5 rear. My car understeer pretty bad especially today in 2-4" of fresh snow. Would camber setting affect snow handling a lot? Or this is only affect street performance?

I have to do a lot of Scandinavian flick to do the back end to rotate. This is my first season with true winter tire on my Forester. I am running 215/65R16 Gislaved Norfrost 5 which are pretty well known as a good winter tire for Saab and Volvo.
 

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2006 XT
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My current camber setup are 0.9 front and 1.5 rear. My car understeer pretty bad especially today in 2-4" of fresh snow. Would camber setting affect snow handling a lot? Or this is only affect street performance?

I have to do a lot of Scandinavian flick to do the back end to rotate. This is my first season with true winter tire on my Forester. I am running 215/65R16 Gislaved Norfrost 5 which are pretty well known as a good winter tire for Saab and Volvo.
The generic comment would be that understeer is a result of to much speed, cut the speed to reduce. Yes then you play with springs, dampers, sways, pressures, tire compounds... to resolve. I don't know your setup so I can't comment. Since my ride is stiff as they come I'm an example of the worst snow/ice/rain setup. When I track/solo in the wet I disconnect the bars, set the dampers to soft and pray:huh:

Why the current, imho, wierd settings? Not much snow here it Texas so I can't really comment. But dry/wet/snow... the Foz is an understeering pig. If you set your own, try -5 up front and see if there is a difference. I dd -2/-1 and if I want the fast times, on track only, I'll set it to -5/-2. Of course with camber plates and crash bolts:icon_razz:

Keep it out of the ditch.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The car handles fine at normal speed but it not fun. I wanted the car to oversteer instead of understeer. The current set up are done before I got the rear camber bolt. I am running Swift spring and STI RSB with 215/65R16 Gislaved Nordfrost 5 winter tire. This tire seems to understeer quite a bit more than my all season/summer setup. Maybe the 65 aspect ratio have greater effect on it. My STI rear bar are not adjustable and it might be a bit too stiff for winter set up.

I am planning to get the alignment done again in the near future. I going to shoot for -1.6 front and -0.8 rear. I have not found any info for winter set up alignment set up. Just curious if people found a different set up for better snow performance. Might have to patron some ice racing board to find out if they are using different set up than normal autocross set up.
 

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-1.5 front and -1.0 rear does the trick for me (same suspension setup as yours) in terms of oversteer capabilities. However, I'd say that for most daily driving -1.5 front camber is too much. And definitely too much in winter, as the speeds are less, traction is less, so you can't load the front end enough, and thus get less rather than more traction with more chamber (at "city" speeds and corners). My next alignment will have less difference between front and rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well if that its true that more camber means less snow traction then I would be oversteering all the time since my front camber are a lot less than rear camber. That is not the case right now. My car understeer pretty bad on snow.
 

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Well if that its true that more camber means less snow traction then I would be oversteering all the time since my front camber are a lot less than rear camber. That is not the case right now. My car understeer pretty bad on snow.
You want more camber in the front than back. Too much camber will cause you to have less traction/braking in a straight line however. I'd go with -1.5 to 2 front and around -1 rear. I wouldn't run anymore than -1 in the rear though.
 

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Biggest effect on whether you understeer/oversteer will be the tyre pressures you are running on the front compared to the back. Experiment a little. Softer pressures on the rear will increase oversteer and vice versa.
 

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Stiffening up the rear (stiffer springs, heavier sway bar) will create less understeer. Watch out for making the car oversteer though. Most drivers will find an oversteer quite hard to handle. A reasonable extent of understeer is also a safety feature: If you go into the turns too fast, the car will hit with the crash zones first.
 

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Stiffening up the rear (stiffer springs, heavier sway bar) will create less understeer. Watch out for making the car oversteer though. Most drivers will find an oversteer quite hard to handle. A reasonable extent of understeer is also a safety feature: If you go into the turns too fast, the car will hit with the crash zones first.
I'd rather oversteer than understeer. Understeer usually means you hit the curb with the wheels, destroying the suspension and often tweaking the car enough that its never quite the same. Also, hitting a curb or rail sideways can cause the car to flip. I'd rather oversteer and be able to pull out of it, at least then you actually make it around the corner, even if you end up backward on the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I been playing with tire pressure quite a bit. I am running about 2 PSI lower right now. I might have to lower it even more in the back.
 
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