Subaru Forester Owners Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
2021 Forester
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi we have a 2021 S Subaru Forester and plan on heading across the Nullarbor when the WA Premier Frees opens the prison gates. Thinking a bull bar could be a good investment? Looking for some recommendations? Brands? What to look for / consider etc (Alloy, Steel, Weight).. (Western Australia Suppliers)..

Also, has anyone had one fitted and it interfered with sensors, suspension or airbags?

Thank you in advance
 

·
Registered
2020 Forester 2.5i-S (Touring)
Joined
·
215 Posts

·
Registered
MY21 Forester Sport 2.5i
Joined
·
4 Posts
mate, I think you are overthinking it.
If you are driving from Ceduna to Balladonia (East to West), it is bitumen the entire way (even if you are coming West to East, it is the same highway), with road houses every 200-300km (sometimes closer).

Unless you are planning on driving at night (not recommended), then you won't need a bulbar (which will add approx 40-60kg to the front of your vehicle, affecting your steering and tyre wear, braking performance, resale value, etc etc), as well as costing you a lot of money (move than $2k supply and fitted).

I have driven in both directions a number of times, in different vehicles, from an old Landrover Defender 90, to a recent Toyota Prado. No bulbar required (and this included beach driving and heading north up some of the 4*4 tracks).

Drive to the conditions, and you will be fine.
 

·
Registered
2020 Forester 2.5i-S (Touring)
Joined
·
215 Posts
The cost of the bullbar is worth it, hit one roo and whilst insurance may pay for the damage, it's not nice being stuck in the middle of nowhere looking for help.

Me, I would prefer to play safe and protect the vehicle and my peace of mind.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,740 Posts
I would feel uncomfortable anywhere in the outback without some frontal protection; I've seen too many animal strikes and the results of those strikes to take the risk. Protection for the radiator at least because without that you're going nowhere. ;)
 

·
Registered
MY21 Forester Sport 2.5i
Joined
·
4 Posts
Slope Triangle Rectangle Font Parallel



Mate, you are looking to drive a highway, you are not in the outback, there are roadhouses every couple of hundred kms, and regular vehicle traffic.

The average weight of a Western Plains Grey Kangaroo is 42-76kg.

PPE (a bulbar) is the last and least effective method of safety control.

Drive during the day (when roos are not about, dromedaries may be, and pigs, goats, wedgetail eagles, etc, but they are a different issue), if you need to drive at night, lower your speed so that you can stop in time if you see something.

In the end, it is totally up to you what you do, but a Forester is a light weight vehicle, it is not a four wheel drive, in my opinion (and that is what it is), you do not need a bulbar.

Enjoy the drive over the Nullarbor, it is quite amazing.
 

·
Registered
2013/14 2.5i-L CVT
Joined
·
1,004 Posts
Hit a roo at 100-110 kph with a Forester and with or without a bull bar it'll be leaving the scene on a tow truck and you could be exiting in an ambulance. Foresters don't have ladder frames to bolt bars too so the attachment isn't anywhere near as robust. The other issue is they sit lower to the ground than 4x4s so what often happens is roos get flipped onto the bonnet and then hit the windscreen (if they come through then get out asap because they may survive the impact and go crazy when they come to). Hit a cow, donkey, or gawd forbid camel and it's curtains.

The other factor is what effect bull bars have on crumple zones. Afaik, none of the bull bars made in Australia have been tested by ANCAP or similar, so any safety claims should be taken with a road-train of salt.

I grew up north of Kalgoorlie, but all of my working life was on the east coast so I've driven back and forth across the Nullabor more times than I care to remember to visit family. Have never hit an animal in nearly 60 years of driving. Don't drive after dusk, watch both sides of the road for movement and if there is vegetation close by slow down and be extra alert. And take lots of Aerogard as the flies have been insane in recent years.
 

·
Registered
2010 Forester Diesel 6MT
Joined
·
924 Posts
Elimination: Not allowed to elimnate the native wildlife unfortunately no matter how much we sometimes want to! The feral wildlife however...
Substitution: Big fluffy stuffed kangaroos?
Engineering controls: Not sure how you'd engineer a roo. But engineering some intelligence into them would be a good start
Administrative controls: Get roos to behave around traffic and you'll be up for a Nobel prize quick smart. In the meantime train some 'lollipop roos' to control the others
PPE: W'll get the roos reflective fluoro vests :)

Has anyone else noticed how almost all the car safety today is based around the bottom of the (inverted) pyramid- PPE? Seat belts, airbags, ABS, TCS/VDC, Eyesight, sensors, etc and les & less is done further up the pyramid. And yet in other safety training I partake in, it's the opposite.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Kevin

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,740 Posts
When I cross the Nullarbor I'm going for Elimination - I'll carry a gun :D

By coincidence Back Roads on the ABC News Channel are repeating the 2 episodes of crossing the Nullabor - the first was yesterday and the second today at 2:30 PM.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top