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2019 Forester Limited
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376 Posts
Nope. The "OEM pressure" always refers to gauge pressure.

From the perspective of your tires, taking a properly inflated tire from LA to mile-high Denver where the atmospheric pressure pushing in on them is 2.5 PSI less, is no different than staying in LA and adding 2.5 PSI to your tires at the air pump. In either case, the tires are overinflated by 2.5 PSI.
 

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2011 Forester 2.5X Automatic
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109 Posts
A standard TPMS turns on the dash light when the tire pressure drops 25%(!) below the pressure the sensors are set at. So a typical 32 psi tire would have the light come on at a 24 psi.
I can pretty much assure you your neighbor probably hasn't a clue as to what the TPMS idiot light means nor will they take the time to pull out the book to find out. They'll just drive around that way with the light on. I've answered more than a few tire pressure questions and TPMS issues on other forums to know your average car owner knows squat about the vehicle they are driving and nothing of any warning indications. Ignorance is bliss ...'til it's not.
 

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2020 Forester Sport
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Nope. The "OEM pressure" always refers to gauge pressure.

From the perspective of your tires, taking a properly inflated tire from LA to mile-high Denver where the atmospheric pressure pushing in on them is 2.5 PSI less, is no different than staying in LA and adding 2.5 PSI to your tires at the air pump. In either case, the tires are overinflated by 2.5 PSI.
I see. I was thinking incorrectly that I needed to add air to make up for altitude. Since the TPMS shows the internal tire pressure, it would always read low at altitudes above sea level, unless there was a sensor for atmospheric pressure. I guess OEM specs are based on gauge readings because the external shape of the tires would change at altitude. So always using a gauge to set the tires to OEM PSI would keep tire shape the same regardless of altitude. Thanks for the info.
 

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2019 Touring
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197 Posts
Trust but verify - My Subaru at sea level reads pretty accurately. Within a pound. I have the same on my motorcycle and it too is accurate. It's interesting to watch the pressure as the tires heat up during use, but if it's set correctly it will give you good information.

My PITA complaint is when my tail gate will not open and I have to disconnect my battery for a minute. The my tire pressure number reverts to metric ! It's a pain to reset... You would think that if the speedometer is english, everything would be the same. Why not ???????
 

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2020 Forester Sport
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
Trust but verify - My Subaru at sea level reads pretty accurately. Within a pound. I have the same on my motorcycle and it too is accurate. It's interesting to watch the pressure as the tires heat up during use, but if it's set correctly it will give you good information.

My PITA complaint is when my tail gate will not open and I have to disconnect my battery for a minute. The my tire pressure number reverts to metric ! It's a pain to reset... You would think that if the speedometer is english, everything would be the same. Why not ???????
I haven't had that tail gate problem on my 2020. Is that a common problem? Hopefully they've resolved that issue.
 

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2019 Touring CVT
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258 Posts
R
Trust but verify - My Subaru at sea level reads pretty accurately. Within a pound. I have the same on my motorcycle and it too is accurate. It's interesting to watch the pressure as the tires heat up during use, but if it's set correctly it will give you good information.

My PITA complaint is when my tail gate will not open and I have to disconnect my battery for a minute. The my tire pressure number reverts to metric ! It's a pain to reset... You would think that if the speedometer is english, everything would be the same. Why not ???????
Rather than disconnecting the battery when the gate gives you 3 beeps and fails to open, press and hold the button above the license plate until the gate releases. This is a known solution.
 

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2019 Touring
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197 Posts
Pressing and holding the button above the license plate did not work. That was the way I initially tried to open it, then I tried the button inside, near the drivers door. that too, did not work.
 

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2019 Forester Limited
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376 Posts
Maybe your VIN is among those mentioned in a TSB as needing a replacement rear gate controller.
 

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2019 Forester - Touring CVT
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21 Posts
IMHO, this is simply more needless "technological" **** car makers ...including Subaru ...are foisting onto the "technological cognoscenti" ...
This is incorrect. As with most of these safety improvements, they are mandated by the Government, not the auto maker. TPMS became federal law for all passenger vehicles produced after September 2007. This was driven by the Firestone tire under-inflation & roll over issue that Ford had.

Auto Stop/Start is another example. If a vehicle is EPA certified with Auto Stop/Start, then the vehicle design must not allow the owner to permanently defeat Auto Start/Stop. It can only be temporarily disabled by the owner for the current drive cycle.
 

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2011 Forester 2.5X Automatic
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109 Posts
The Nanny State lives.

The reason the tires failed on the Ford Explorer (the old full-size version I believe it was) had to do with the ridiculously low inflation pressures Ford recommended on this vehicle ...the more to make, essentially, a truck-based SUV ride like a car than the truck it's based on. You could've put any tires on that Ford truck SUV and, with the low inflation pressures, have the tire fail catastrophically because so many owners don't take the personal responsibility to check tire pressures ...ever.

And the only reason for the Stop/Start systems was to boost the city EPA mileage ratings on gas piggy vehicles such as full size SUV's and the like. This has nothing to do with safety nor the Government mandating anything; the automakers came up with this stupid system for their own good all cached and marketed in the "green" trying to save the planet mentality. But because the makers certified the car with this ridiculous system it has to default to function all the time. In some vehicles ...like a Subaru as I understand it ...you the owner can't turn it off, ever.
 
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