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2020 Forester Sport
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2020 Subaru Forester sport with eyesight 28k miles

I think this is related in this post. More of a battery to circuit to vehicle issue. I’ll be randomly stopped and if I have auto start stop on … once my car stops after a few times the fourth or so time it will not start back up. It will lock up wherever I’m at and force me to turn it off then cannot turn the car back on.
the work around I found is using a jump start on the battery to boot it back up and runs just like normal afterwards.
I took it in but the dealership service center said no issues and they couldn’t replicate the problem even though it’s happened to me a few times in random places. So much so I now can just pop the hood up a jump start myself like I’m drinking routine morning coffee. Taking it back in and hoping a 2 year old vehicle is covered under warranty. I attached the errors I get but I think those are just a consequence of the auto start not kicking back on. Battery and alternator tested fine. Any advice helps! Thanks!
Car Speedometer Steering part Automotive design Gauge
Speedometer Car Trip computer Odometer Motor vehicle
Car Speedometer Trip computer Motor vehicle Vehicle
Wheel Speedometer Motor vehicle Car Automotive tire
 

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2022 Forester Wilderness
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482 Posts
This is absolutely covered under your factory warranty, which is good for 3 years and/or 36k miles, whichever comes first. I consider this type of malfunction 100% unacceptable in a new-ish vehicle. I would take it to the dealer and tell them, "you figure this out, and in the meantime, I'm driving a loaner for free." I bet you they will be able to "replicate" the issue VERY quickly. I would not spend a second wracking my brain to try and understand what is going on here. That's what you paid the dealer for when you bought the vehicle, including its factory warranty.

Good luck!
 

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2022 Forester Sport
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320 Posts
This is absolutely covered under your factory warranty, which is good for 3 years and/or 36k miles, whichever comes first. I consider this type of malfunction 100% unacceptable in a new-ish vehicle. I would take it to the dealer and tell them, "you figure this out, and in the meantime, I'm driving a loaner for free." I bet you they will be able to "replicate" the issue VERY quickly. I would not spend a second wracking my brain to try and understand what is going on here. That's what you paid the dealer for when you bought the vehicle, including its factory warranty.

Good luck!
Except most dealers currently have no loaners in their fleet.
 

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2012 Forester X Auto
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3,132 Posts
The next time it happens, record the incident on your phone.
Bring it into the dealer. If they can't find a problem, record it again and bring it back.
When they haven't been able to correct the issue after three attempts, you are very likely eligible for the lemon law.
Good luck.
 

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2022 Forester Sport
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320 Posts
The next time it happens, record the incident on your phone.
Bring it into the dealer. If they can't find a problem, record it again and bring it back.
When they haven't been able to correct the issue after three attempts, you are very likely eligible for the lemon law.
Good luck.
Depends on the jurisdiction. In my state the vehicle has to have less than 18k miles to be eligible for lemon consideration.
 

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2012 Forester X Auto
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3,132 Posts
Maybe the OP is lucky enough to not live in your state.
In any case, the original warranty should be intact as @DesertTwang pointed out, and this should be an obvious defect when pointed out with proof.

If it were me, the next time it happened, I'd be ready and call Subaru roadside assistance to get the car towed.
The other obvious remedy is to ensure that the dysfunctional A.S.S. is disabled.
 

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2019 Touring (70K Miles as of March 2022)
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227 Posts
Sounds like your battery is shot. There is enough voltage to pass a test, but the cranking capacity/load capacity. New cars do funny things when the batteries have reached the end of their life cycle.

I would be shocked if swapping a new battery doesn’t solve your problem. Keep us updated on your solution.

fyi, you can fit a Group 24 (AGM is the preferred type) battery in lieu of the stock, smaller group 35. More amp hours and more cranking amp capacity— aka faster, smoother engine starts.
 

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2022 Forester Sport
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320 Posts
Sounds like your battery is shot. There is enough voltage to pass a test, but the cranking capacity/load capacity. New cars do funny things when the batteries have reached the end of their life cycle.

I would be shocked if swapping a new battery doesn’t solve your problem. Keep us updated on your solution.

fyi, you can fit a Group 24 (AGM is the preferred type) battery in lieu of the stock, smaller group 35. More amp hours and more cranking amp capacity— aka faster, smoother engine starts.
AGM is the preferred type for folks on internet forums. On Subaru's with AS/S, Subaru wants an EF battery. Depending on one's driving habits, Subaru's charging system may not adequately maintain an AGM.

At the dealership where my son works, they would not even touch the OP's issue if the EFB had been replaced with an AGM.
 

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2012 Forester X Auto
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Take the wisdom of Subaru with a grain of salt.
For many years (still?) a Subaru dealer would (will?) replace an EJ head gasket with the OEM type known to fail rather than the MLS type which does not.

Replacing a battery with the type that repeatedly fail (the EFB) because they are lighter (for emissions purposes) and cheaper (which allows for the dealer to overcharge (pardon the pun)) makes sense for the dealer, not the customer.

If you research battery problems with A.S.S. equipped vehicles, you will find that many people have problems with the stock batteries, and many of those stop having problems after replacement with a better quality AGM type.

As far as the dealer not dealing with the OP's problem - That is already happening as the geniuses at the dealership can't find the problem and just return the car as is.

It would seem to be unlikely for the battery test to be omitted, but who knows.
Maybe the shop was busy and the A.S.S. worked three times so they said all was well.

It sounds like not going to the dealer for an overpriced, inferior battery may not be in the OP's interest, if indeed the battery is the problem. It may or may not be.

In the OP's case, a battery load test check is pretty easy to do, and can be done for free at many auto parts stores.
Perhaps a second opinion is warranted.
 

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2018 LTD, 2023 Sport on order
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143 Posts
My 2018 had the OEM Panasonic battery start to turn the engine over weakly after its first winter of use.
After reading of similar disappointment from other Forester owners in cold climates, I did the logical thing.
Instead of complaining and getting another under- amped Panasonic, I got an EverStart 35 N (N for North) from Walmart.
No issues whatsoever with winter starting the last 3 years.

Every battery will eventually fail, and to think a service department would reject electrical service on a vehicle with a battey other than OEM is preposterous.
 

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2022 Forester Sport
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320 Posts
My 2018 had the OEM Panasonic battery start to turn the engine over weakly after its first winter of use.
After reading of similar disappointment from other Forester owners in cold climates, I did the logical thing.
Instead of complaining and getting another under- amped Panasonic, I got an EverStart 35 N (N for North) from Walmart.
No issues whatsoever with winter starting the last 3 years.

Every battery will eventually fail, and to think a service department would reject electrical service on a vehicle with a battey other than OEM is preposterous.
Does your '18 have AS/S? Battery type is not as important in non AS/S equipped Subaru's.

I don't think an OEM battery has been mentioned. The service department will be looking for an oem TYPE battery. If it has AS/S and it came with an EFB, they will be looking for an EFB.
 

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2019 Touring (70K Miles as of March 2022)
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227 Posts
If you’re in the warranty period, get a new battery for free and you’ll get another 2 years of service before you need to replace with a decent sized battery.

I’ve also noticed the Subaru has a smart alternator that disengages at under acceleration and ramps up current when you are coasting, like a hybrid. If you keep the lights or parking lights on, the car will maintain 14.3 volts, which may allow the battery to remain fully charged instead of constantly charging and discharging.

@DragonSubie7 I’ve noticed the car does not do a great job at keeping any battery fully charged unless you keep the lights in parking mode or manual on.
 

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How many amps does this battery have? How many amps are listed under the CCA label on the battery?
 
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