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AU MY06 XS Luxury Auto
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If the prices of the Supercats were the same as the Bridgestones, which one would you choose, and why?

"For the price of 2 new Bridgestone tyres, I can get 4 new Supercat HT!"
Would you prefer for the same investment, you ended up with 4x Supercats or 4x Duelers (albeit two with "good thread")? I don't know if you'd get anything for your existing Duelers if you sold them.

For me, I'd just get whatever that complements the best two and rotate front set and back set every now and then till all four are replaced.

Bridgestone NZ lists the Supercat H/T for $295 each, and both Bridgestone Dueler H/P Sport (98V) and H/L 400 (98H) at $445 when I just checked.

So at retail, 4x Supercats are $1,180; 2x Duelers are $890. For around $300 more, I can't see why I would go with the Supercats, unless it was not based on the cost.

Supercat H/T
Bridgestone Dueler H/P Sport
BrandSupercatBridgestone
ProductDUELER
PatternSupercat H/TBridgestone Dueler HP Sport
Size225/55R18225/55R18
Load Index9898
Speed RatingVV
ApplicationHighway TerrainHighway Performance
Driving StyleHighway TerrainHighway Performance
DescriptionEngineered to deliver low road noise, stability and safe handling in wet and dry conditions.Fit the tyre giving luxury SUVs the driving characteristics of a high performance road car.
Online Price only$295$445
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Thanks @broadbean for your well considered reply, thanks for taking the time.

I'm doing a bit more research having looked at the reviews for the Supercat - not glowing. Will either stay with the duelers or try something else.
 

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2017 2.5i Premium CVT
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Not sure what the dealer did or did not do with regard to the TPMS. It's really a two step process. I have a tool to read each censor -- it tells me the sensor is functioning, the pressure, and the code for the sensor. Once I have the four codes and their placement, I use a different tool to transmit the information to the ECU. I follow this process when I change my winter to summer wheels and tires. In fact, I'll be doing it again very soon.

So what I'm wondering is, did the dealer merely confirm that the sensors were working without checking to see if the ECU had the correct codes and respective locations for the wheels?
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Not sure what the dealer did or did not do with regard to the TPMS. It's really a two step process. I have a tool to read each censor -- it tells me the sensor is functioning, the pressure, and the code for the sensor. Once I have the four codes and their placement, I use a different tool to transmit the information to the ECU. I follow this process when I change my winter to summer wheels and tires. In fact, I'll be doing it again very soon.

So what I'm wondering is, did the dealer merely confirm that the sensors were working without checking to see if the ECU had the correct codes and respective locations for the wheels?
You would think they would, wouldn't you? To say I'm disappointed in the dealer is an understatement. They said the system couldn't detect one sensor and stopped, wouldn't proceed to scan anything else; sounded silly to me. It was me, at a tyre place, that figured out the sensor was not in the spare wheel that was on the car but in the wheel in the boot.

They were quoting me for the replacement of all 4 sensors instead.

Crazy.

Hopefully, the saga should end today with a reset now that all 4 wheels are on the car.
 

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2011 Forester
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Hi all,

I've tried to hold off asking this question here but I've read all I can and still confused. I probably need 2 separate threads but...

I've had my Forester Premium (MY2019) for couple of weeks now, circa 40,000kms on the clock. I've had no end of trouble with the TPMS that the dealer can't seem to fix. The light came on and stays on, no reading in the dash for pressures at all. Initially was told by dealer that they thought one wheel sensor was missing but they couldn't confirm - silly I thought. Went to a tyre dealer and they simply checked the valves and pinpointed that the spare wheel was on the car (no sensor) and swapped the tyres round so all 4 wheels had the TPMS sensor in (visual check only). All tyres inflated but still, no dice. TMPS light still on. What to do?

Next issue is apparently the rolling circumference in the front and rear wheels is said to differ by >10mm by dealer, I've been advised that this is harmful to the AWD. There are 3 Bridgestone Duelers (2 with good tread and 1 that is lower) on the car and 1 chinese tyre (looks new), all same 225/55/r18. Bridgestones are 98v while the chinese tyre is 98H. Do I buy 2 new tyres, put them on the front and keep the older, fresher tread on the back (thus relegating the Chinese tyre to the spare) or do I have to buy 4 new tyres? Expensive.

Is tyre wear a factor in rolling circumference or simply tyre brand differences and quality? Does speed rating matter?

Sorry for the ramble and thanks for your help.
You need four matching tires. Different OE's have different Rev/mile. As they wear the rpm goes up. Basically you can handle about a 1% difference maybe in rpm.
 

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2011 Forester
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Best advice is All four tires identical. Same 'size' tires by different manufacturers or with significantly different tread patterns can have different rolling circumference and exhibit different handling behaviors. This is bad for AWD, and can be bad for handling and safety.

As for tire wear among identical tires, yes it can contribute to the difference over time. Front tires carry a heavier load and can wear down faster. Since I live in snow country, I account for this at the semi-annual summer/snow rotation, by putting the better pair on the front each time.
I agree. Tire mfg will measure and publish their engineering data. Different mfg will also have different cornering stiffness and traction parameters. Michelin demonstrates the oversteer/understeer in their schools when moving tires around. Like you stated, run the best tread on steer for summer only as less likely to have oversteer issue then and steers provide most of the braking and due to caster, more wear, so they will wear faster. And the drive forces will be higher for the steer too. Tires are actually slipping when accelerating and braking. You do not have to spin to increase the wear. In brake testing for trucks we see 11 % slip without sliding the tires.
 

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2011 Subaru Forester
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All I can say is wow--tires are expensive in New Zealand! Prices like that I would be looking at Chinese Black Lion, Winglings, and so on. Or maybe Korean Sailun. You could also probably save money by going for an H rated rather than V rated tire. So in your shoes, I would buy 4 matching less expensive ones if that helps. Good luck.
 

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2011 Subaru Forester
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Yup, the Sailun Turismo on sale for $130 NZ each 225 55 18 would be a good deal and highway tire. Even have a W speed rating. You get 4 tires for a bit more than one Dueler, if money is a consideration.
PS I realize you might be nowhere near these guys, but who knows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·

Yup, the Sailun Turismo on sale for $130 NZ each 225 55 18 would be a good deal and highway tire. Even have a W speed rating. You get 4 tires for a bit more than one Dueler, if money is a consideration.
PS I realize you might be nowhere near these guys, but who knows.
Amazing how you found that site all the way over the interwebz in Canada and I missed it here, lol!
 
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