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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I was wondering if anyone knows what the proper tire pressure should be on the Forester Sport 2019? The placard on the door jam says 35psi Front and 33psi Rear, but when I just checked them after getting the car from the dealership about 3 weeks ago, I see they are at 39psi +???? Is the door jam wrong or did the dealership overinflated my tires??

Falken ZIEX ZE001 A/S 225/55 R18 98H M+S

Thanks for any advice anyone can offer. :)

Blake
 

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Were they measured cold? Always measure and inflate while cold. i.e., not driven on.

If so, the dealership subjectively overinflated your tires.

I tend to run 2-3 psi above what it says on the door.
 

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It's a well known issue, Drake. Dealers almost always overfill the tires. One time after an oil change, mine were almost 15-lbs higher than they should have been!

You're safe using the placard. Some like to put in a little more than that, which is fine, too.

Mike

Edit: Just read Sneefy's note. I forgot to mention ambient outside temperature and whether the tires were "cold."
 

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It is my understanding that the cars are shipped with high air pressure (in case they start to go flat on journey). Part of dealer prep is supposed to be dropping pressure to recommended levels. That being said, my tires were at 39-41 when I picked it up at dealer. The salesman blamed the prep guy, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all for the advice and info. I will adjust them to the recommended PSI listed on the door placard this morning before I take it out for a drive.

Thanks again!
 

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Carmaker's recommendations are a little on the low side in order to give you a softer ride. Carmakes also get the tiremakes to make tires just a little softer than the ones you can buy for replacement. These tires will ride a little softer buy they also wear a little faster. If you replace the original tires with the same brand/size you will notice a little harder ride.
 

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Carmaker's recommendations are a little on the low side in order to give you a softer ride. Carmakes also get the tiremakes to make tires just a little softer than the ones you can buy for replacement. These tires will ride a little softer buy they also wear a little faster. If you replace the original tires with the same brand/size you will notice a little harder ride.
Source?

Laughing at oneself and with others is good for the Soul
 

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Source?

Laughing at oneself and with others is good for the Soul
That may have been the case before the Ford Explorer/Firestone debacle a few years back, but I don’t think manufacturers recommend low inflation pressures below whet the tire manufacturer recommends anymore... far too much legal liability nowadays to do that.

On trick shippers use to help secure vehicles for shipping is to reduce tire pressure, secure the vehicle to the shipping “station”, then re-add tire pressure to ensure the vehicle has no “play” on the platform. Dealers are instructed to verify the proper tire pressure during pre-sales preparation, but that step gets overlooked by lots of dealerships.

I’ve picked up new vehicles with as much as 8-12 lbs pressure over the stated recommended pressure in the manual/door placard. It happens quite frequently.

Another thing that often gets missed during the pre-delivery process is the rubber plug/grommet installation underneath the vehicle where the tie-down points are located, especially in areas where there’s little snow/road salt application.
 

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OEM tires are made to the car manufacturer's specifications and not to those of the tire company.

The same-name, same-size aftermarket tire is often of superior construction to the same-name, same-size OEM tire.

Remember the Ford Explorer/Firestone debacle, where Ford recommended tire pressures lower than Firestone's recommendation in order to compensate for a ride problem. The result: overheating due to low pressure, followed by tire failure.
 

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Dealer service departments and tire shops are notorious for over-inflating tires to the maximum psi on the sidewall. Guess they figure that most people seldom check their tire pressure and over-inflation postpones under-inflation for some time.
 

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Dealer service departments and tire shops are notorious for over-inflating tires to the maximum psi on the sidewall. Guess they figure that most people seldom check their tire pressure and over-inflation postpones under-inflation for some time.
I buy my tires at Costco, which includes free rotation, balancing, and nitrogen inflation for the life of the tire. We get it done as scheduled while we shop, no appointment necessary. Cheap Top Tier gas there, too.

They inflate according to the door-jamb label, and put their own sticker on the windshield with the miles-to-next-service and tire pressure written on it.

They also want you to stop by after 50 miles to have the lug nuts re-torqued. And buy a roast chicken while you're there, I guess.
 

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Noticed our '19s tires were also "high" when checked on info screen, so check with gauge, it was showing same, but it handles well and rides good still. I'll likely leave them alone, they'll wear anyway.

The tire's sidewall spec is usually, that PSI required of that tire to carry the weight it's rated for. Less, and the tire will safely carry less weight. The PSI listed on the door is enough to carry the vehicle and manufacturer's recommended load maximums.Tire construction also plays into it. A lightweight tire with thin sidewalls designed to run elevated speeds … like pursuit tires on police cars, will use / need higher PSI to meet the load requirements. A tire with stiffer sidewalls will need less PSI and will run hotter due to internal ply friction at the higher speeds.

A few extra PSI over top of door sticker specs is where I like mine, I like crisper handling. Ride isn't hurt too much, tread wears maybe more in center, but I like the feel.

I'm getting used to this Sport still, but as an example, I run Goodyear RS-As on my wife's Mustang and our Mercury GM and on two T-birds, they show 44 on sidewalls, I keep them at 40 anyway. They wear great, and feel great, and I do watch wear patterns.

During my career as a state LEO, I always ran the tires at the PSI on the sidewall, always. Served me well.
… And buy (?) a roast chicken while you're there, I guess.
On a vacation trip in the Merc a few years back, I stopped to get an oil change at Newton, Ks. at an oil change place. Came out and drove away, and turned back, they let my tires down to 32 psi and the car was squirrely …. had them put back to 42 psi. Guy thought I was a loon, but I was the one driving it. :laugh:.

I don't mind eating at a Costco, I like the sampling & I'll check with my T-wrench anyway.:thumbsup:
 

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Akeblay, like you, I noticed Freehold Subaru in NJ overinflated my tires at 45 psi (cold tire pressure) though the door jam says 35psi Front and 33psi Rear. I will not be going to Subaru Freehold for any vehicle work.
 

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Anyone notice the tire pressure displayed on dash is wrong?
On my '19 Forester tire readings displayed on the dash for each tire is always about 4-6 PSI lower than the actual tire pressure. I have two digital tire pressure gauges that read the same pressure value so I believe that over the displayed pressure on the dash.
 

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Glad to hear that Costco does it right. BTW, those roasted chickens are a loss leader to the tune of $34M per year!
Costco doesn't always do it right.

Bought tires at Costco last year. TPMS light came on during my short drive home. Checked the tire pressure when I got home and all four tires were severely underinflated, around 18 to 22 PSI in each. Fortunately I have an air compressor and was able to refill the tires but had to use normal air that contains "only" 78% nitrogen (the horror) .
Lessoned learned. Check your tire pressure after all tire services (new tires, balance, rotation or whatever). Over the years I have had a couple of incidents where my tires were severely overinflated by 10+ psi (not at Costco).

And no, I don't buy in to the nitrogen inflated tires thing, especially for the typical passenger car tire as IMHO the benefits, if any, are extremely minute. But, that's another subject for another day....... :smile2:
 

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You remind me of someone who either can't read, don't believe what they read or you are a democrat.lol

Google this and you'd get 100 sources saying it's true and just as many saying it's untrue. So take your pick and have a nice day.
So, what’s wrong with asking for supporting evidence of a claim? Do you believe everything you read on the Internet?

And, while we’re at it... what does political sarcasm have to do with the subject?
 
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