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2019 Forester Base
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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone noticed how eyesight disengages when you're on a major interstate, and one, or several tractor trailers drive next to you, in moderate to heavy rain, or worse yet, with wet snow / below freezing temperatures?
Let alone, eyesight dies, stability control, cruise control, and other handy items just completely disengage when you need them most.

Plus, on bright sunny days, if you accelerate 5+ MPH to pass someone, the cruise control automatically hits the brakes, after the pass is made, apparently trying to piss off the driver you just passed.
 

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2015 Forester Premium CVT
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394 Posts
Time to take it to the dealer.

EyeSight stops working in heavy rain or direct sunlight. Below freezing, EyeSight will stop working only if the windshield still has frost on it but others won't disengage.
No experience with interstate or with tractor-trailers.

That being said, it has happened to me twice that out of nowhere, everything that you mentioned stops working, dash lights up. I just pull over the vehicle, turn it off, wait for 10 seconds and restart. All is reset. Both the time it happened, it was going below 10mph. Last time it happened, I plugged in OBD reader but Torque Pro pulled no codes. So it was baffling.
 

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2011 Subaru Forester
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Maybe the thinking is the worse the conditions the more important it is that the driver be fully alert, and making responsible decisions. There are certain circumstances when we should all probably pull over and not be driving.
 

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2019 Forester
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128 Posts
I have instances where EyeSight goes off because top of windshield has fogged up.
As far as speed control slowing you down - that is what is supposed to happen - you set it at a speed and it attempts to maintain that speed - if you press on gas to go faster when you stop pressing it will slow you down to speed that is set. I suggest you go further past trucks before you slow down or set speed control for faster for a while after pass
 

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2012 Forester X Auto
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It may not make sense, but some of it sounds like a [email protected] - Some of what you are saying, like "with snow or freezing temps.."
Using cruise control is a bad idea in traction compromised environments, including rain, so you should beat the car to the punch and turn it off yourself.
In snow or mud, it's also a good idea to turn off traction control, because the system needs reference wheels to correct one that's spinning.
In mud and snow everything is spinning and the system becomes a liability rather than an asset.
Adaptive cruise uses eyesight, so that's not a mystery when the latter fails. Why it fails.. Apparently there is a list of events that are intended to disable it.
Stability control shouldn't be affected, so get the car checked out, along with eyesight, if your failure scenario is different.
It's under warranty, right?
If you can replicate the problem, record it if possible, as "system glitches" most often generate NTF replies from a service department.
The cruise issue description is just the way it works, as the car is trying to keep you at a set speed.
Since you know what it will do, disable it briefly when passing and turn it back on when you have adequate distance ahead of the vehicle you passed.

 

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2019 Forester Base
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Discussion Starter #8
I guess you're right, even though it looks like the stability control light, stability control still works, but the dash lights up like a christmas tree when a tractor trailer goes by in the rain. It makes you take your eyes off the road, when you probably shouldn't.
It seems like sonar buttons would work better in bad weather. Since bad weather is the reason to get a Subaru, it makes one wonder...

Plus, it doesn't reset as quickly as indicated below.
529018
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Maybe the thinking is the worse the conditions the more important it is that the driver be fully alert, and making responsible decisions. There are certain circumstances when we should all probably pull over and not be driving.
Rain is not one of those conditions.
 

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2019 Forester Sport CVT
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433 Posts
I always use NeverWet for glass and my Eyesight works great in very heavy desert monsoon rains. I never use wipers at any speed above walking pace. The only time Eyesight kicks off is if I'm sitting at a light, wipers off and it is misting so as to cover the windscreen in tiny droplets. Once I move forward the drops blow off and Eyesight resumes.
 

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I think @MoneyJohn said it in the first reply...
If the car is acting up and doing "seemingly inappropriate" behaviors, bring it in and get it checked out, and hopefully you at least get an explanation.
On the other hand, the quote from your manual says that Eyesight will be disabled "in poor weather conditions"...
In rain and especially when a semi-truck sprays your car like a fire hose, if you can't see briefly, the chances for a computer being able to "see" via an optical camera are probably even less. Unlike you, the computer doesn't know why it is suddenly blind, so rather than do something inappropriate it turns off. It may be that you need your expectations reset, because the driver assist systems don't always do what you want when you want in the way you want them.
 

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2015 Forester2.5i Premium CVT
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When my wife is in the passenger seat, she warns me if she sees a potential hazard. I appreciate this, and sometimes it’s useful. Once or twice over the years, she’s seen something I didn’t, and we may have avoided a problem.

But I don’t rely on her, because sometimes she falls asleep.
————

Don’t use Eyesight to control the car. If you need to pass on the highway — or execute any other maneuver — control the car yourself. Eyesight is an assistant. You are the driver.
 

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eyesight disengages when you're on a major interstate, and one, or several tractor trailers drive next to you,
And throw up a lot of spray/mist affecting Eyesight vision?

on bright sunny days, if you accelerate 5+ MPH to pass someone, the cruise control automatically hits the brakes, after the pass is made
Which is what it is designed to do and why there are cancel and resume buttons. Eyesight is a driving aid, not a chauffeur. You have to drive the car and make decisions about whether using it is appropriate for the conditions/circumstances.
 

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2018 2.5i Premium CVT
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There have been two situations when Eyesight gave out on me, and I fully understand why that would happen to an optically based system.

- Driving directly into the setting sun.

- Driving in deep fog.

Both involve external factors and have nothing to do with the car itself.
 

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2018 2.0 FXT-Touring CVT
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I always use NeverWet for glass and my Eyesight works great in very heavy desert monsoon rains. I never use wipers at any speed above walking pace. The only time Eyesight kicks off is if I'm sitting at a light, wipers off and it is misting so as to cover the windscreen in tiny droplets. Once I move forward the drops blow off and Eyesight resumes.
That's great for you, but what about snow/ice/sleet? We get plenty of that up here. Mix in fog and poor road lighting...
 

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That's great for you, but what about snow/ice/sleet? We get plenty of that up here. Mix in fog and poor road lighting...
Snow/ice/sleet? I don't know. - On other vehicles I carefully clean my windshield with a brass scraper before driving.

The OP mentioned heavy rain and spray from semi trucks. Neither of which affect my vision with NeverWet the way it did before I started treating my windscreen with RainX decades ago.

Fog? Fog is fog. What do you expect? Infrared?

Poor road lighting? Well, I prefer no street lighting as I see the road better without the distraction of streetlights. The LED Forester lighting is pretty darn good.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Competing vehicles use sonar with adaptive cruise control & forward collision braking. This enables both systems to work, even in the rain, wet snow and direct sunlight.
That helps the driver to keep their eyes on the road, rather than address beeping noises and three warning indicators on the instrument panel as tractor trailers pass close by.

Where I live, roads are well treated, and snow doesn't accumulate on the roadways unless it's snowing hard. The roads are usually covered in salt & beet juice (yes, really), or sometimes brine, which makes them wet when it snows, but that's about it. Many other States are not like this.
 

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I'm not sure how to respond to you. I can't tell if you are serious or snarky.

I'll check out that product.
I'm serious as a heart attack. Being able to see through the windshield is critical to driving safety. That's why I keep bringing up my experience with NeverWet for glass, which is a huge improvement on the RainX I used for decades. Improvement because it lasts a very long time.

I see fools with dark tinted windows and untreated windows driving poorly, I.E.: slow & uncertain, when it is raining.

With few exceptions I see through the windscreen in heavy rain as well as no rain. Does heavy rain and truck spray affect distance visibility? Sure, as that water obscures forward vision ahead of the car.

If it is going to be a rainy day, I add a layer of NeverWet to the windscreen in the garage. Less than 2 minutes of effort to increase driving safety.
 
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