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2001 Forester
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One other thing to note is that the Canadian dollar is worth about 75 cents US, so the brake job cost is the equivalent of $750, not $1000. Still high, but not really that high if rotors were replaced and at $100 off, you were in for $675 US, which feels almost right. Dealer parts and service prices have gotten pretty pricey in recent years so you may want to find another general mechanic to do basic work like brakes.
Labour costs are higher in Canada, combined he has to pay PST and GST. Sooo given the higher labour costs, the exchange rate difference means very little.
 

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2019 Forester Touring
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The AWD, Traction Control and VDC all use selective braking to control wheel spin. Those will all contribute to brake wear. A lot of winter or off road driving would most likely result in higher brake wear than someone in a temperate climate.
 

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2015 SJ 2.0XTP HTLCVT
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I got ~similar mileage out of my '15 Forester XT OEM pads & discs. I live in the OPs general area (but on the other side of the border), so weather conditions are similar, city/urban driving conditions are probably similar but I may drive/stop a bit more aggressively (not a street racer, but I don't baby it). My brakes started feeling a bit wonky around 20000mi/37039km so I asked my dealer to look at them when I had it in for another issue with random ABS & other dash warning lights (turned out to be the brake switch recall problem, but it was back before the dealer would admit to knowing anything about what was causing the trouble and they implied I must have been doing something wrong or the "alleged" problem was being caused by some modification I had done to the car (the Whiteline sway bar was cited as evidance), even though the brake switch had already been updated by Subaru at least once by that time and was identified as the cause/solution here and other places on the internets [I ended up replacing the switch myself, twice, before the recall was announced and the latest version was introduced]).

They told me then that the front pads were worn unevenly, the discs were scored, everything needed to be replaced IMMEDIATELY and it wouldn't be covered under warranty because it was my fault for not bringing the car in to to have the brakes routinely serviced twice a year, supposedly because Foresters driven on roads where salt is used need to have their caliper guide pins lubricated that often (try to find that one listed in the official recommended service interval list).

So, I replaced the brake switch myself and had the guide pins on all four calipers lubed by my mechanic (I would have done it myself in better weather). He said the uneven pad wear wasn't that bad and would probably equalize once they were freed up, and they did. They lasted another ~10K before I replaced them with Centric ceramic pads and (plain) rotors at ~30000mi/55559km. I now plan on lubing the caliper guide pins myself around once a year when I take the winter Hakkas off in the spring.

Which brings up another issue, the cold morning startup performance (or lack thereof) of ceramic pads in cold climates such as ours. If It's less than 20 °F/ -6.7° outside, your heart will be in your throat for the first couple of stops, but they're OK once even slightly warmed up. I was aware of this potential drawback as I've had other ceramics in the past and in all fairness to Centric, they do acknowledge this characteristic in their product selection charts, it just seems these are worse than anything I've had before. I mention this because the experience gave me a new appreciation as to just how good Subaru OEM brake pads really are. There is no perfect pad compound that excels at everything as far as I know but Subaru OEM pads appear to be an ideal compromise for real world conditions; low dust, good cold weather first stop(s) performance, decent wear in ideal driving conditions and adequate fade resistance for all but would-be racers and people who refuse to engine brake when going down mountains. People like us who do a lot of city/urban driving won't see the mileage others tout, but I understand why the trade-off is necessary and there are definitely worse combinations out there (I've had some real brake eaters in the past).

Also, sometimes my Forester sits for almost a week without being driven and the brake rotors develop an obvious coat of light rust if it's rainy of humid out. Every time one of these pad life discussions comes up, I can't help but wonder whether this condition causes accelerated pad wear while the rotors are being polished up again. People who drive their car every day with bright shiny rotors might never see the kind of accelerated wear this condition may cause, if any. Who knows...

FWIW, I usually turn off traction control when driving in moderately icy/snowy conditions so it won't be pulsing the brakes more frequently, theoretically decreasing pad life.

My '15 Forester has been the LEAST reliable car I have ever owned in terms of the number of recalls and warranty issues so far (thankfully I bought a Subaru extended warranty), but I love enough other things about it to MAYBE buy another one, IF they ever start making the Forester XT again.
 

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So what are we really looking at on parts? In the U.S.:

Front Pads $30
Front Rotor pair: $75
Rear Pads $30
Rear Rotors: $75

So about $200 in parts for a U.S. Vehicle and $300 at the most for Canada?

2 Hours maybe to do the work? $400-500 seems possible.
 

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@TheMiz

🇦🇺 Is your vehicle an Automatic?
If so, driving with two feet is not a good idea. Driving with one foot is better, as I’ll explain.

With the two foot method it’s easy to “rest” a foot on the brake.
Then it is possible to accidentally touch the brakes without knowing its happening.

That can cause premature brake wear.

Driving an auto with one foot avoids that completely.
I was taught to drive an auto with one foot in the days when you could still put your spare foot over the tunnel.
Not easy to do now!
 

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2011 Forester 2.5X Automatic
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Brakes are considered normal wear items.

Some folks can go through brakes fairly quickly depending on how they drive ...others can have them last a long time. There's no way any vehicle manufacturer is going to warranty brakes ...or clutches or windshield wipers ...stuff that just wears out dependent on how it is used.

What vehicles have you owned where normal wear items are covered under warranty? I've never owned a new vehicle with a standard factory warranty covering normal wear items.

You don't have to be a "speed racer" to use up brakes and rotors; you just have to be a "two-foot" driver. I'm talking people who drive with one foot on the gas and one foot resting lightly on the brake pedal. If you're a two foot driver then that's right there why you could've ended up with a short term pad/rotor life.

When you discussed this "brake service" what did they tell you this service entails? Did you ask? It would be nice to know. The vehicle has 4-wheel disc brakes. The only thing I can think needing service might be greasing the caliper pins the calipers slide on when they move when brakes are applied. Could this be a brake fluid change? I believe it's recommended the brake fluid be changed or flushed every other year or so ...but I'm thinking that's not going to effect pad and rotor wear.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
I am not a two foot driver. The dealer said the damaged rotors caused the excess break wear. I am not a techy but I follow all the required services under warranty. I have only had this vehicle 28 months. The dealer said I should have had the breaks serviced, but never suggested that when I bought the vehicle or at any service interval and they even admitted that Subaru doesn't require it. I baby my vehicles, am not an agressive driver and use my breaks sparingly, so this is a quality issue covered or not. As I keep repeating in this thread.

As I have mentioned, between my wife and I we have had over 30 new vehicles (I only buy new) and have never had to spend a penny (other than scheduled maintenance) while under warranty. Getting a brake service under 24 months is just nuts anyway. Subaru has cheaped out on wear items because they never have to take responsibility for them. Is the only thing I can see, since they refuse any responsibility.
 

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2011 Subaru Forester
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Its ok. I won't be surprised if you show up on another forum in 3 or 4 years and letting the world know how that brand has abandoned all quality. If you want to do an investigation and tell us how Subaru has changed their rotor specs so that they require replacement faster, I for one would be interested. But this kind of insistence that things must be so because those are your expectations, is really a bit much. I have not read another thread similar to yours. The issue is not widespread.
FYI just like an Italian tune-up is good for your engine every now and then, so is giving your brakes a good workout. Don't be afraid to mash em every now and then. You might find this an interesting read.
 

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2011 Subaru Forester
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As one master tech said in his contribution to the above thread link
''
I can pull the front wheels off and take one look and have a pretty good idea of the driver. Young men will have hot spots sometimes even heat cracks in the rotors typical of braking hard most of the time and the brake pads become brittle. I can tell the older drivers as they brake early, slow and easy and the brake rotor will almost have a mirror reflection. The young man needs brakes and rotors and time to grow up(he won't listen and everyone knows it). The older driver(only older people truly take it easy on their cars) is an easy fix, I take the car out get up to 45–50mph and do a hard stop( no tire squeal on ABS but very close) then another mile or so before another(I prefer a total of 3 with at least a mile or more in between, this creates a LOT of heat and don't want to warp the rotors). Personally, I no charge to deglaze, older drivers return where they are treated well and anyway lots of other drivers who aren't going to have glazed rotors.

I don't tell people with glazed rotors to do hard stops, it's not how they drive and don't want them to warp their rotors. Plus they brought me the car to have me fix it not to tell them how.''

I suspect this guy would have resolved your problem for free, whereas the service advisor at Subaru may have been looking to maximize his/her sales.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Thanks for all the input. Hopefully this is just my nightmare and from here on will be smooth sailing. What happened may not be right, but no one else seems to have run the same thing, so maybe a one off. Still can't help being disappointed in Subaru's sluff off. Here's to hoping!
 

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2018 Subaru Forester XT CVT
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Ii want to thank everyone for their feedback. That my situation is not normal and it appears that on top of that the dealership soaked me. Lesson learned.

As a first time owner of a 2018 Forester Touring XT, I just want to say every one of my interactions with SubaruUSA customer service has been exemplary. No waiting times to speak with anyone, I got a kind, articulate, helpful person on the phone every time, who solved my warranty issue very quickly and to my complete satisfaction. I would give them an A+ and I couldn't be happier with my car...
 

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2018 Forester
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As for excessive brake wear I see lots of drivers nowadays who seem to want to make their stop in the last 50 ft. which,IMO, is hard on brakes.
One little pet peeve of mine is why so many people describe devices used to stop vehicles as "breaks"?? I guess they must have slept through the spelling classes.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Guilty as charged. That is what I get for typing on a phone with word fill and not proof reading. Another lesson learned. 👍😖
 

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The wife got a lesson on proofreading a few yrs ago. Texting our granddaughter named Vicky she typed"Hey, Vick" and the phone made it "Hey, *****". Luckily she caught it before sending.
 

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2014 Forester Touring 2.5 CVT
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Looking for others feedback. I bought a 2018 Forester Touring model because I retired and planned to keep my next vehicle indefinitely, so I went for what I thought was a quality product from a quality manufacturer. Love the vehicle despite it's tech items being way behind the competition, until I hit 40,000 km (25,000 miles) and I had to have a complete brake and rotor job done with 8 months left on warranty. Is this normal?????

Background: on the last service I took it in and asked them to check the brakes as there seemed to be a little noise and pulsing on quick stops (note: I baby my vehicles). They check it out and said I needed brakes and rotors done at $980. I said, wait this is still way under warranty and this should not be happening now. They shrugged and said that this is not covered by warranty. I said, give me a break. They then asked if I had had the brakes serviced. I said I have brought the vehicle in for every recommended an scheduled service that has been required and asked if this was a regular service item. The guy checks and says that I haven't had a brake service done. I asked if that is recommended and required by Subaru. He says it would have helped, but it is not required or recommended officially by Subaru. I said I have had over 15 new vehicles in my life and have never had to pay for anything during the warranty period other than regular maintenance and that this is ridiculous! Out of pity they give me a whole hundred dollars off.

Next I complained to Subaru and am told that it is too bad that this is not a warranty issue. I insist on talking to a supervisor or someone higher up and am told that their Service Manager does not talk to customers! Am I missing something or doesn't the title Service Manager mean that they are there to service their customers? In other words, to put it nicely "Stuff it"!

I have a buddy that has a 2019 Forester and apparently brake service is recommended for that model year. Are you kidding me! This seems like a bandaid for a quality issue.

Is this the way Subaru stands behind its products? At this point Subaru's quality and reputation are just the way things used to be. Am I the only one?

Thanks
Lesson is, don't take your Subaru to a dealership with wear issues. Try to find an honest local mechanic or do it yourself. Save the dealership for warranty issues or higher tech issues.
 

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2014 Forester Touring 2.5 CVT
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Looking for others feedback. I bought a 2018 Forester Touring model because I retired and planned to keep my next vehicle indefinitely, so I went for what I thought was a quality product from a quality manufacturer. Love the vehicle despite it's tech items being way behind the competition, until I hit 40,000 km (25,000 miles) and I had to have a complete brake and rotor job done with 8 months left on warranty. Is this normal?????

Background: on the last service I took it in and asked them to check the brakes as there seemed to be a little noise and pulsing on quick stops (note: I baby my vehicles). They check it out and said I needed brakes and rotors done at $980. I said, wait this is still way under warranty and this should not be happening now. They shrugged and said that this is not covered by warranty. I said, give me a break. They then asked if I had had the brakes serviced. I said I have brought the vehicle in for every recommended an scheduled service that has been required and asked if this was a regular service item. The guy checks and says that I haven't had a brake service done. I asked if that is recommended and required by Subaru. He says it would have helped, but it is not required or recommended officially by Subaru. I said I have had over 15 new vehicles in my life and have never had to pay for anything during the warranty period other than regular maintenance and that this is ridiculous! Out of pity they give me a whole hundred dollars off.

Next I complained to Subaru and am told that it is too bad that this is not a warranty issue. I insist on talking to a supervisor or someone higher up and am told that their Service Manager does not talk to customers! Am I missing something or doesn't the title Service Manager mean that they are there to service their customers? In other words, to put it nicely "Stuff it"!

I have a buddy that has a 2019 Forester and apparently brake service is recommended for that model year. Are you kidding me! This seems like a bandaid for a quality issue.

Is this the way Subaru stands behind its products? At this point Subaru's quality and reputation are just the way things used to be. Am I the only one?

Thanks
Oh, try re-torquing the lug nuts. Too tight and you'll get that pulsation through the brake edal. Dealership may not be so interested in simple fixes.
 
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